Row by Row Garden Show https://hosstools.com/wheel-hoe-blog/ Greg and Travis from Hoss Tools talk all things vegetable gardening. Fri, 25 Sep 2020 18:40:26 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.1 Join Greg and Travis from Hoss Tools for the Row by Row Garden Show. Their weekly vegetable gardening show focuses on content for people who like to grow their own food. Greg and Travis discuss current gardening trends, best varieties to plant, tips and tricks for improving your harvest, and much more! Greg and Travis clean episodic Greg and Travis tkey@hosstools.com tkey@hosstools.com (Greg and Travis) Row by Row Garden Show Row by Row Garden Show https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/wp-content/uploads/powerpress/podcast-logo-369.jpg https://hosstools.com/wheel-hoe-blog/ TV-G Norman Park, GA Weekly Row By Row Episode 115: Making a Profit Selling Produce From Your Home Garden! https://hosstools.com/making-a-profit-selling-produce-from-your-home-garden/ Mon, 14 Sep 2020 17:11:33 +0000 https://hosstools.com/?p=137014 Our Experience with Selling Produce Market farming, or selling your produce to others, can come in many different forms, whether that is a roadside stand, a U-pick agritourism model, or your traditional farmers market. The way we have found success with selling produce is a weekly bag model. Travis and his wife have been successfully market farming for over five years now, and they want to share what they have found to be the best way to do it. What their model looks like is posting on Facebook that they have a vegetable bag for sale for $25. The post will include a list of what they have harvested and tell them that they will get a mix of five products—not letting people choose cuts down on the time it takes to pack the bags. For each product, let's say okra, you will get enough in the bag to feed a family of four.  Once people have claimed their bag, which there is no subscription, this is an every week model. They then either Venmo or Paypal to pay for their vegetable bag. Having this cashless transaction also cuts down on time. People can choose to either pick up or have it delivered, and they will receive their vegetables at the first of the week.  This model works well for a family that does market farming on the side. Selling an average of 20 bags a week at $25 a bag isn't too shabby. It all comes down to making sure people know about your bag and making that bag appealing to them. That's is where marketing comes into play.  How-To Market your Produce Marketing your vegetables is essential when becoming a market farmer. If people do not know about your products or don't understand why it can benefit them, then there is no need for you to waste your time and labor. One significant component of marketing for Travis is Facebook. Creating a Facebook business page will allow everyone who follows it to see the post, which does not happen with Facebook groups. You also have to learn when you should post about your vegetable bags. For Travis, this was on Sundays; this day is when people start thinking about what they will do for dinner for the week. If these working moms see a way to get fresh food delivered to them, they will buy into it, no matter the price. When choosing what vegetables to grow and sell, it is also important to remember to grow staple items. Staple items include summer squash, cucumbers, okra, things people are familiar with, and know-how to cook. You also want to have vegetables that store well to be as fresh as possible when getting to the final consumer. Choosing vegetables that store well will help you market the products and keep customers returning. Show and Tell Segment After trying different methods, we have figured out the best indicator when deciding when our Canary Melon is ready to be harvested, and it's not the curly-q. Our Halo Canary Melon turns a bright yellow, and to assure that they are ripe when you pick them, you want to make sure they have turned that pretty yellow color. When mature, these Canary Melons have a canteloupe texture and are sweet but not as sweet as a watermelon. These melons are powdery mildew resistant making them easier to grow in the heat of the summer.  Hoss Tools is excited to announce we have new seed bags that will be used for shipping. These bags are lined with foil and have a ziplock at the top, making it the best option when storing and shipping seeds. We will also be able to offer larger quantities in our seeds with these bags. Some more exciting news, we have new dwarf sunflower varieties in stock! Including, Mardi Gras Dwarf Sunflower, Sunspot Dwarf Sunflower, and Sungold Dwarf Sunflower. Viewer Question Segment As always, we love the questions our viewers bring to us. After last week's video on market farming, we had a few more questions. One viewer asked if we think non-vegetable items would do well with a market farm. Our answer was simple, YES! If you can put the planning into it and figure a way to get it to the customers, Our Experience with Selling Produce Market farming, or selling your produce to others, can come in many different forms, whether that is a roadside stand, a U-pick agritourism model, or your traditional farmers market. Our Experience with Selling Produce<br /> Market farming, or selling your produce to others, can come in many different forms, whether that is a roadside stand, a U-pick agritourism model, or your traditional farmers market. The way we have found success with selling produce is a weekly bag model. Travis and his wife have been successfully market farming for over five years now, and they want to share what they have found to be the best way to do it.<br /> <br /> What their model looks like is posting on Facebook that they have a vegetable bag for sale for $25. The post will include a list of what they have harvested and tell them that they will get a mix of five products—not letting people choose cuts down on the time it takes to pack the bags. For each product, let's say okra, you will get enough in the bag to feed a family of four. <br /> <br /> Once people have claimed their bag, which there is no subscription, this is an every week model. They then either Venmo or Paypal to pay for their vegetable bag. Having this cashless transaction also cuts down on time. People can choose to either pick up or have it delivered, and they will receive their vegetables at the first of the week. <br /> <br /> This model works well for a family that does market farming on the side. Selling an average of 20 bags a week at $25 a bag isn't too shabby. It all comes down to making sure people know about your bag and making that bag appealing to them. That's is where marketing comes into play. <br /> How-To Market your Produce<br /> Marketing your vegetables is essential when becoming a market farmer. If people do not know about your products or don't understand why it can benefit them, then there is no need for you to waste your time and labor. One significant component of marketing for Travis is Facebook. Creating a Facebook business page will allow everyone who follows it to see the post, which does not happen with Facebook groups.<br /> <br /> You also have to learn when you should post about your vegetable bags. For Travis, this was on Sundays; this day is when people start thinking about what they will do for dinner for the week. If these working moms see a way to get fresh food delivered to them, they will buy into it, no matter the price.<br /> <br /> When choosing what vegetables to grow and sell, it is also important to remember to grow staple items. Staple items include summer squash, cucumbers, okra, things people are familiar with, and know-how to cook. You also want to have vegetables that store well to be as fresh as possible when getting to the final consumer. Choosing vegetables that store well will help you market the products and keep customers returning.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> After trying different methods, we have figured out the best indicator when deciding when our Canary Melon is ready to be harvested, and it's not the curly-q. Our Halo Canary Melon turns a bright yellow, and to assure that they are ripe when you pick them, you want to make sure they have turned that pretty yellow color. When mature, these Canary Melons have a canteloupe texture and are sweet but not as sweet as a watermelon. These melons are powdery mildew resistant making them easier to grow in the heat of the summer. <br /> <br /> Hoss Tools is excited to announce we have new seed bags that will be used for shipping. These bags are lined with foil and have a ziplock at the top, making it the best option when storing and shipping seeds. We will also be able to offer larger quantities in our seeds with these bags.<br /> <br /> Some more exciting news, we have new dwarf sunflower varieties in stock! Including, Mardi Gras Dwarf Sunflower, Sunspot Dwarf Sunflower, and Sungold Dwarf Sunflower.<br /> Viewer Question Segment<br /> As always, we love the questions our viewers bring to us. After last week's video on market farming, we had a few more questions. One viewer asked if we think non-vegetable items would do well with... Greg and Travis 45:57 Row By Row Episode 114: How To Start a Successful Market Farm From Your Home Garden https://hosstools.com/how-to-start-a-successful-market-farm-from-your-home-garden/ Mon, 14 Sep 2020 13:48:25 +0000 https://hosstools.com/?p=136616 Things to Consider Before Diving into a Market Farm Growing food for your family and friends is one thing but turning it into a profitable business is another. A market farm can be a very successful business if the right components come together, but if not, it may not be worth your time or money. Travis of Hoss Tools has run a market farm business for six years and wants to share a few of his tips for making sure this business is for you. Before you dive into this market farm headfirst, there are some things you need to consider. First, make sure that you have already mastered gardening just for your family. If you cannot garden successfully for your family alone, you don't need to worry about feeding others.  Another thing you want to have a good grasp of before you begin is knowing your customer. For Travis, that is catering towards the middle-class, working mom types. Because Travis delivers a vegetable bag to people's homes, his reliable customers want fresh food but don't have time to grow it themselves. Understanding your customer is also understanding what vegetables are popular among your community. It would help if you grew the things that are going to sell, which can differ for each region. Down here in South Georgia, some of the easiest and profitable vegetables include:  Kale Okra Summer Squash Cucumbers Peppers Eggplant Also, remember to be cautious of only growing things that you are good at growing. If you aren't good at growing Kale, don't waste your time and money.  Ways to Make Your Market Farm Profitable When market farming, you need to remember the grocery store is not your competition. You can not base your prices on what the grocery store does. Understand why your produce is superior and sell that to your customers; they will then justify the expense. Figuring out how you would like to structure selling your vegetables will help a lot too. Do you want to sell retail or wholesale, or a mix of both? It is always a good idea, whatever you can't sell directly to customers, to ask butcher shops or local country stores if they would like some of your produce. It is important to remember to have a plan from the beginning, start small, and be okay with change. Marketing your products online is a great way to make your business more profitable. Showing future customers recipes and cooking demonstrations with the vegetables you are selling that week is a great way to advertise. Facebook and Instagram are great places to do this. To get your name out there, you need to utilize social media. Show and Tell Segment There are many crops in South Georgia that we can't enjoy that the northerners can, but there are also many things we get to grow that they cannot. One of those items includes Muscadines. Muscadines come off in August, which is a perfect time with it being a break between our summer and fall gardens. Muscadines are a staple homestead item and an ideal garden snack, and you can find them all over South Georiga. As mentioned above, it is a quiet time around the garden as we are finished with our spring garden and waiting until it is time to plant for the Fall. Right now, our cover crops are getting pretty tall, and it's about time to work them back into the garden. This year we tried many combinations of warm-season cover crops, known as cover crop cocktails. When mixing cover crops, you need to look at the growth rate and how tall each one gets and plant those similar together. Not doing this will have one plant overpowering the other, leaving one with no sun to keep growing, therefore, missing the benefits that crop could bring to the garden. If you aren't following Hoss Tools on Instagram or Facebook, make sure you check it out. We are currently doing a question of the day series only on those platforms to help answer some of the most frequently asked gardener questions. Also, don't forget to submit your recipes for the Row By Row Cookbook. Things to Consider Before Diving into a Market Farm Growing food for your family and friends is one thing but turning it into a profitable business is another. A market farm can be a very successful business if the right components come together, Things to Consider Before Diving into a Market Farm<br /> Growing food for your family and friends is one thing but turning it into a profitable business is another. A market farm can be a very successful business if the right components come together, but if not, it may not be worth your time or money. Travis of Hoss Tools has run a market farm business for six years and wants to share a few of his tips for making sure this business is for you.<br /> <br /> Before you dive into this market farm headfirst, there are some things you need to consider. First, make sure that you have already mastered gardening just for your family. If you cannot garden successfully for your family alone, you don't need to worry about feeding others. <br /> <br /> Another thing you want to have a good grasp of before you begin is knowing your customer. For Travis, that is catering towards the middle-class, working mom types. Because Travis delivers a vegetable bag to people's homes, his reliable customers want fresh food but don't have time to grow it themselves.<br /> <br /> Understanding your customer is also understanding what vegetables are popular among your community. It would help if you grew the things that are going to sell, which can differ for each region. Down here in South Georgia, some of the easiest and profitable vegetables include:<br /> <br />  Kale<br /> Okra<br /> Summer Squash<br /> Cucumbers<br /> Peppers<br /> Eggplant<br /> <br /> Also, remember to be cautious of only growing things that you are good at growing. If you aren't good at growing Kale, don't waste your time and money. <br /> Ways to Make Your Market Farm Profitable<br /> When market farming, you need to remember the grocery store is not your competition. You can not base your prices on what the grocery store does. Understand why your produce is superior and sell that to your customers; they will then justify the expense.<br /> <br /> Figuring out how you would like to structure selling your vegetables will help a lot too. Do you want to sell retail or wholesale, or a mix of both? It is always a good idea, whatever you can't sell directly to customers, to ask butcher shops or local country stores if they would like some of your produce. It is important to remember to have a plan from the beginning, start small, and be okay with change.<br /> <br /> Marketing your products online is a great way to make your business more profitable. Showing future customers recipes and cooking demonstrations with the vegetables you are selling that week is a great way to advertise. Facebook and Instagram are great places to do this. To get your name out there, you need to utilize social media.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> There are many crops in South Georgia that we can't enjoy that the northerners can, but there are also many things we get to grow that they cannot. One of those items includes Muscadines. Muscadines come off in August, which is a perfect time with it being a break between our summer and fall gardens. Muscadines are a staple homestead item and an ideal garden snack, and you can find them all over South Georiga.<br /> <br /> As mentioned above, it is a quiet time around the garden as we are finished with our spring garden and waiting until it is time to plant for the Fall. Right now, our cover crops are getting pretty tall, and it's about time to work them back into the garden. This year we tried many combinations of warm-season cover crops, known as cover crop cocktails. When mixing cover crops, you need to look at the growth rate and how tall each one gets and plant those similar together. Not doing this will have one plant overpowering the other, leaving one with no sun to keep growing, therefore, missing the benefits that crop could bring to the garden.<br /> <br /> If you aren't following Hoss Tools on Instagram or Facebook, make sure you check it out. We are currently doing a question of the day series only on th... Greg and Travis 52:56 Row By Row Episode 113:The BEST Crops to Replant in the Fall for the Home Gardener https://hosstools.com/the-best-crops-to-replant-in-the-fall-for-the-home-gardener/ Wed, 09 Sep 2020 17:55:04 +0000 https://hosstools.com/?p=136282 List of Crops to Replant in the Fall Many of us home gardeners enjoy our spring garden but become unsure as the summer months heat up, and it is time to replant for the fall garden. So what are the best crops I can carry over to my fall garden? The men of Hoss Tools came up with a list of vegetables that your Fall garden is going to love!! Christmas Lima Pole Bean Rattlesnake Pole Bean Halo Canary Melon Ambrosia Sweet Corn Texas Creme 40 Pea Gold Star Squash Olympian Cucumber Pascola Zucchini There are a few other crops we believe can thrive in a Fall garden, such as Okra, Peppers, and Eggplant. With the right irrigation and spraying program, these crops can beat the Fall heat! Things to Remember if you are Going to Replant in the Fall As mentioned, you have to stay on top of your Fall garden to make sure you can get a plentiful harvest. That begins with picking an excellent disease-resistant variety like the ones listed above. You also need to pay attention to the maturity dates and know if the crop is a one time harvest, like corn, or multiple harvests such as our cucumbers. You would not want to plant your cucumbers with only enough time before the first frost for one harvest because it would not be worth your time and resources. If you have that short window before frost, you need to plant something that would only have one harvest. For different crops, different varieties may mature faster than others. For example, the Pepo species of summer squash is much quicker to develop than the Machado varieties.  There are some vegetable plants you can let go dormant to come alive again in the Fall. They might start to look a little raggedy, but they will come alive again and give you harvest if you continue to spray and take care of them. Some of those crops include our lima and pole beans, peppers, and eggplants.  However, a crop like Okra is better to succession plant throughout the spring and Fall to get the best harvest. Doing the succession planting with our Silver Queen Okra like that will give you Okra till the first frost date.  Show and Tell Segment Growing new things you have never tried before is one of the highlights of gardening. Travis has never tasted, let alone grown a Canary Melon until now, and it was a hit! Our Halo Canary Melon is a winter melon meaning that it can store a lot longer than most of your Muskmelons. Of course, with growing anything new, the guys had to do a taste test. The results came back good, with the texture of a watermelon and the refreshing taste of cucumber, I believe we will see more of this Canary Melon. Speaking of Cucumbers, they are still kicking! As long as you have a disease-resistant variety like our Olympus, you can grow Cucumbers well into August. To avoid the bitter taste that comes with the heat stress, make sure they are on drip tape or getting adequate water! Our Sweet Potatoes are coming along and different from the Cucumbers; it is time to back off on our Sweet Potato plants' watering. Once they get on up, this drought-resistant crop does better with a lack of water. Another crop that loves the hot, dry weather of South Georgia in August is Sunflowers. Our Sunflowers are not only a pretty sight to see in the garden, but they are doing their job as a cover crop as they help cleanse the soil. Viewer Question Segment Our viewers are always challenging us to dig deeper and help answer some of their tough gardening questions. This week our first question asked us, did we think there will be a food shortage, and should we be saving all of our heirloom seeds? From the looks of the thousands of acres of commercial produce farms near us and the way they are still steadily out there every day, we don't see a food shortage in our near future. Saving heirloom seeds can be a neat thing to do if your variety is hard to get your hands on, but if it is one you can find easily, it might not be worth your time to save those seeds. List of Crops to Replant in the Fall Many of us home gardeners enjoy our spring garden but become unsure as the summer months heat up, and it is time to replant for the fall garden. So what are the best crops I can carry over to my fall garden? List of Crops to Replant in the Fall<br /> Many of us home gardeners enjoy our spring garden but become unsure as the summer months heat up, and it is time to replant for the fall garden. So what are the best crops I can carry over to my fall garden? The men of Hoss Tools came up with a list of vegetables that your Fall garden is going to love!!<br /> <br /> Christmas Lima Pole Bean<br /> Rattlesnake Pole Bean<br /> Halo Canary Melon<br /> Ambrosia Sweet Corn<br /> Texas Creme 40 Pea<br /> Gold Star Squash<br /> Olympian Cucumber<br /> Pascola Zucchini<br /> <br /> There are a few other crops we believe can thrive in a Fall garden, such as Okra, Peppers, and Eggplant. With the right irrigation and spraying program, these crops can beat the Fall heat!<br /> Things to Remember if you are Going to Replant in the Fall<br /> As mentioned, you have to stay on top of your Fall garden to make sure you can get a plentiful harvest. That begins with picking an excellent disease-resistant variety like the ones listed above. You also need to pay attention to the maturity dates and know if the crop is a one time harvest, like corn, or multiple harvests such as our cucumbers. You would not want to plant your cucumbers with only enough time before the first frost for one harvest because it would not be worth your time and resources. If you have that short window before frost, you need to plant something that would only have one harvest.<br /> <br /> For different crops, different varieties may mature faster than others. For example, the Pepo species of summer squash is much quicker to develop than the Machado varieties. <br /> <br /> There are some vegetable plants you can let go dormant to come alive again in the Fall. They might start to look a little raggedy, but they will come alive again and give you harvest if you continue to spray and take care of them. Some of those crops include our lima and pole beans, peppers, and eggplants. <br /> <br /> However, a crop like Okra is better to succession plant throughout the spring and Fall to get the best harvest. Doing the succession planting with our Silver Queen Okra like that will give you Okra till the first frost date. <br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> Growing new things you have never tried before is one of the highlights of gardening. Travis has never tasted, let alone grown a Canary Melon until now, and it was a hit! Our Halo Canary Melon is a winter melon meaning that it can store a lot longer than most of your Muskmelons. Of course, with growing anything new, the guys had to do a taste test. The results came back good, with the texture of a watermelon and the refreshing taste of cucumber, I believe we will see more of this Canary Melon.<br /> <br /> Speaking of Cucumbers, they are still kicking! As long as you have a disease-resistant variety like our Olympus, you can grow Cucumbers well into August. To avoid the bitter taste that comes with the heat stress, make sure they are on drip tape or getting adequate water!<br /> <br /> Our Sweet Potatoes are coming along and different from the Cucumbers; it is time to back off on our Sweet Potato plants' watering. Once they get on up, this drought-resistant crop does better with a lack of water.<br /> <br /> Another crop that loves the hot, dry weather of South Georgia in August is Sunflowers. Our Sunflowers are not only a pretty sight to see in the garden, but they are doing their job as a cover crop as they help cleanse the soil.<br /> Viewer Question Segment<br /> Our viewers are always challenging us to dig deeper and help answer some of their tough gardening questions. This week our first question asked us, did we think there will be a food shortage, and should we be saving all of our heirloom seeds? From the looks of the thousands of acres of commercial produce farms near us and the way they are still steadily out there every day, we don't see a food shortage in our near future. Greg and Travis 40:04 Row By Row Episode 112: Getting Ready for our Cool-Season Home Garden! https://hosstools.com/getting-ready-for-our-cool-season-home-garden/ Fri, 21 Aug 2020 19:27:58 +0000 https://hosstools.com/?p=133402 What Crops can I Plant in the Cool-Season? The Fall garden seems to become more popular as each year passes, but the question that lingers with most gardeners is what cool-season vegetables can I plant? At Hoss Tools, we enjoy planting a Fall garden more than our Spring garden, as we think there is more variability with what you can plant in the Fall. Some of our favorite cool-season crops consist of Broccoli, Cabbage, Collards, Lettuce, and Cauliflower. Kale is a great Fall plant many gardeners don't think of but is one of our favorites to cook in a soup. The best variety to make into a soup is the Lacinato Kale. Kohlrabi is also a favorite crop of ours that intimidates the beginner gardener but is very easy to grow. The Purple Elite is our new variety of carrots that we are excited to begin planting soon! Carrots also tend themselves well to the Fall. Another delicious snack for the Fall garden is Brussel Sprouts, picking them straight out of the garden and putting them in some olive oil is a Hoss favorite. We can't forget about Onions because down here in South Georgia, Onions are a must as a cool-season crop. The following list is a few more crops that will work well with adding variability to the Fall garden. BeetsGreensLeeksEnglish PeasRadishesRutabagasSpinachTurnipsSwiss Chard Preparing for a Cool-Season Garden Now that we have what we want to plant, when are we suppose to start planting the vegetables? Planting is very dependent on where you live and the frost date. Once you figure out which zone you are in, that will help tremendously. With our Fall garden, everything except Radish, Carrots, Greens, and Spinach starts as transplants. So the difficulty comes when knowing when to plant them, here is what we have found to be the most accurate dates. If you are in part A of your zone, you will be towards the beginning of those days, and if you are in part B, you will be towards the later dates. First Frost Date: Zone 4: Early-Mid OctoberZone 5: Mid-Late OctoberZone 6: Early-Mid NovemberZone 7: Mid-Late NovemberZone 8: Early-Late DecemberZone 9: Mid-Late DecemberZone 10: No Freeze When to Start Transplants: Zone 5: Mid JulyZone 6: Late JulyZone 7: Mid AugustZone 8: Late AugustZone 9: Mid SeptemberZone 10: Late September In-Ground Transplanting: Zone 5: Mid AugustZone 6: Late AugustZone 7: Mid SeptemberZone 8: Late SeptemberZone 9: Mid OctoberZone 10: Late October Show and Tell Segment The guys are back again with some tasty snacks from the garden. Today they are trying the many types of figs Travis and Greg have in their yards. They both agreed that the best one in flavor was Black Malta. The LSU purple and gold don't fall far behind. Travis brought in his South Anna Butternut it was HUGE! Greg then showed his winter squash, a Cherokee Tan pumpkin. The Cherokee Tan is a great pumpkin pie, and we will be carrying the seeds next year! Another thing we're excited to carry next year is seedless watermelons! But, while we wait for our new seeds, we have to enjoy what we are gardening now. Our Fall garden is getting ready as we prepare for our onions. Greg and Travis both enjoy Fall gardening and hope every gardener takes advantage of this season to grow their own food. Viewer Question Segment On the topic of knowing when to plant certain crops, a viewer asked the question of is it too late to plant corn? Travis and Greg reassured him that it is not, early august on into September is ideal for planting time for corn in his zone. Corn only takes anywhere from 70-100 days to mature, so the time is still there. You may want to feed it with more fertilizer as the disease pressure may be more persistent with this hot weather. Now the next question raises a little more thought, were some heirlooms once hybrids themselves? Yes, that is true. A seed can be stabilized after many years, so if a hybrid was created from two heirlooms, What Crops can I Plant in the Cool-Season? The Fall garden seems to become more popular as each year passes, but the question that lingers with most gardeners is what cool-season vegetables can I plant? At Hoss Tools, What Crops can I Plant in the Cool-Season?<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> The Fall garden seems to become more popular as each year passes, but the question that lingers with most gardeners is what cool-season vegetables can I plant? At Hoss Tools, we enjoy planting a Fall garden more than our Spring garden, as we think there is more variability with what you can plant in the Fall.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Some of our favorite cool-season crops consist of Broccoli, Cabbage, Collards, Lettuce, and Cauliflower. Kale is a great Fall plant many gardeners don't think of but is one of our favorites to cook in a soup. The best variety to make into a soup is the Lacinato Kale. Kohlrabi is also a favorite crop of ours that intimidates the beginner gardener but is very easy to grow.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> The Purple Elite is our new variety of carrots that we are excited to begin planting soon! Carrots also tend themselves well to the Fall. Another delicious snack for the Fall garden is Brussel Sprouts, picking them straight out of the garden and putting them in some olive oil is a Hoss favorite. We can't forget about Onions because down here in South Georgia, Onions are a must as a cool-season crop.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> The following list is a few more crops that will work well with adding variability to the Fall garden.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> BeetsGreensLeeksEnglish PeasRadishesRutabagasSpinachTurnipsSwiss Chard<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Preparing for a Cool-Season Garden<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Now that we have what we want to plant, when are we suppose to start planting the vegetables? Planting is very dependent on where you live and the frost date. Once you figure out which zone you are in, that will help tremendously.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> With our Fall garden, everything except Radish, Carrots, Greens, and Spinach starts as transplants. So the difficulty comes when knowing when to plant them, here is what we have found to be the most accurate dates. If you are in part A of your zone, you will be towards the beginning of those days, and if you are in part B, you will be towards the later dates.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> First Frost Date:<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Zone 4: Early-Mid OctoberZone 5: Mid-Late OctoberZone 6: Early-Mid NovemberZone 7: Mid-Late NovemberZone 8: Early-Late DecemberZone 9: Mid-Late DecemberZone 10: No Freeze<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> When to Start Transplants:<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Zone 5: Mid JulyZone 6: Late JulyZone 7: Mid AugustZone 8: Late AugustZone 9: Mid SeptemberZone 10: Late September<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> In-Ground Transplanting: <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Zone 5: Mid AugustZone 6: Late AugustZone 7: Mid SeptemberZone 8: Late SeptemberZone 9: Mid OctoberZone 10: Late October<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> The guys are back again with some tasty snacks from the garden. Today they are trying the many types of figs Travis and Greg have in their yards. They both agreed that the best one in flavor was Black Malta. The LSU purple and gold don't fall far behind.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Travis brought in his South Anna Butternut it was HUGE! Greg then showed his winter squash, a Cherokee Tan pumpkin. The Cherokee Tan is a great pumpkin pie, and we will be carrying the seeds next year!<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Another thing we're excited to carry next year is seedless watermelons! But, while we wait for our new seeds, we have to enjoy what we are gardening now. Our Fall garden is getting ready as we prepare for our onions. Greg and Travis both enjoy Fall gardening and hope every gardener takes advantage of this season to grow their own food.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Viewer Question Segment<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> On the topic of knowing when to plant certain crops, a viewer asked the question of is it too late to plant corn? Travis and Greg reassured him that it is not, Greg and Travis 47:57 Row By Row Episode 111: Crops That Even Long Time Gardeners Struggle Growing! https://hosstools.com/crops-that-even-long-time-gardeners-struggle-growing/ Wed, 19 Aug 2020 20:29:12 +0000 https://hosstools.com/?p=132604 Crops We Don't Struggle Growing Like any long-time gardeners, we have our crops we consider ourselves experts at and those we struggle growing. There are many factors in determining what you are good at growing—things like your location, soil conditions, and the variety of seed. But sometimes, even in the perfect setting, you just can't seem to get a grasp on how to make a good crop. The following crops are some of the few things we at Hoss Tools consider ourselves pretty dang good at growing! For Travis, on that list is Carrots, Lettuce, Beets, Rutabagas, and Collards. For Greg, that consists of Tomatoes, Watermelons, Winter Squash, Corn, and Onions. In South Georgia, we are thankful to have weather conditions that allow us to grow this wide array of crops. Tips to Help you Not Struggle Growing these Crops! Over the years, we have learned a few tips and tricks as we became experts in those vegetables. Carrots, we have learned that growing them in a double row on drip tape seems to work best. Rutabagas also do great on drip tape because you can inject fertilizer directly to them. For lettuce, there are a few things you can do to make sure you have a crop on into April, such as using drip tape, stacking them in tight, and succession planting. Beets do best if you transplant them because that will give you a more consistent size. The last tip Travis had was with collards as they are easy to grow with the right variety you can grow for nine months out of the year. One type we recommend is the Top Bunch. Greg's tips were also simple ones, including feeding your tomatoes and corn hard with fertilizer in the beginning. With corn, you also want adequate watering, and knowing your timing, when you see that leaf has just a little bit of burn, you are doing it right! Watermelons and winter squash, make sure you plant them where they have never grown before, so they have the correct soil they need. Both of those crops are prone to get many soil-borne diseases. Lastly, with onions, you want to understand their lifecycle, so you know when to stop fertilizing them as they start to bulb. Crops We Do Struggle Growing Now that we have talked about what we are good at growing let's talk about the things we struggle growing. Opposite of Travis, Greg struggles growing carrots as his soil has a high weed seed bank, which leads to many problems. Another difficult one is Fordhook Lima Beans, these set of beans are super yummy but just something Greg can't figure out. English Peas are definitely worth the while when it comes to flavor, but you have to understand the timing, or like Greg, you won't be too good at growing it. Now, peppers struggle in Greg's garden because the insect pressure is high, and he admitted that he doesn't pay enough attention to fertilizing them because he and Mrs.Hoss don't eat that many. Brussel Sprouts have an extended date to maturity, and because of this, both Travis and Greg lose interest and end up not doing too well with this crop. You also need cold weather to trigger sprout growth, and that is something we don't get much of in South Georgia. Some other things Travis struggles growing because it's not cold enough is Shallots. English Peas need in-between weather also to do well and again we don't get much of anything but hot here!! When it comes to field peas, we do a good job growing them as a cover crop, but when we raise them to eat, they get eaten up, and we can't seem to put enough fertilizer on them. The last thing Travis admitted struggling with was herbs. Herbs are something he wants to get into but just don't know enough about them yet. Growing herbs is one of his goals for this next year! Show and Tell Segment If you weren't already hungry, hearing about all the delicious things Hoss Tools has coming out of the garden will surely make your mouth water! For example some homemade pasta sauce, with the use of our vegetable garden tomatoes, onions, peppers, Crops We Don't Struggle Growing Like any long-time gardeners, we have our crops we consider ourselves experts at and those we struggle growing. There are many factors in determining what you are good at growing—things like your location, Crops We Don't Struggle Growing <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Like any long-time gardeners, we have our crops we consider ourselves experts at and those we struggle growing. There are many factors in determining what you are good at growing—things like your location, soil conditions, and the variety of seed. But sometimes, even in the perfect setting, you just can't seem to get a grasp on how to make a good crop.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> The following crops are some of the few things we at Hoss Tools consider ourselves pretty dang good at growing! For Travis, on that list is Carrots, Lettuce, Beets, Rutabagas, and Collards. For Greg, that consists of Tomatoes, Watermelons, Winter Squash, Corn, and Onions. In South Georgia, we are thankful to have weather conditions that allow us to grow this wide array of crops.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Tips to Help you Not Struggle Growing these Crops! <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Over the years, we have learned a few tips and tricks as we became experts in those vegetables. Carrots, we have learned that growing them in a double row on drip tape seems to work best. Rutabagas also do great on drip tape because you can inject fertilizer directly to them. For lettuce, there are a few things you can do to make sure you have a crop on into April, such as using drip tape, stacking them in tight, and succession planting. <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Beets do best if you transplant them because that will give you a more consistent size. The last tip Travis had was with collards as they are easy to grow with the right variety you can grow for nine months out of the year. One type we recommend is the Top Bunch.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Greg's tips were also simple ones, including feeding your tomatoes and corn hard with fertilizer in the beginning. With corn, you also want adequate watering, and knowing your timing, when you see that leaf has just a little bit of burn, you are doing it right! Watermelons and winter squash, make sure you plant them where they have never grown before, so they have the correct soil they need. Both of those crops are prone to get many soil-borne diseases. Lastly, with onions, you want to understand their lifecycle, so you know when to stop fertilizing them as they start to bulb.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Crops We Do Struggle Growing<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Now that we have talked about what we are good at growing let's talk about the things we struggle growing. Opposite of Travis, Greg struggles growing carrots as his soil has a high weed seed bank, which leads to many problems. Another difficult one is Fordhook Lima Beans, these set of beans are super yummy but just something Greg can't figure out.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> English Peas are definitely worth the while when it comes to flavor, but you have to understand the timing, or like Greg, you won't be too good at growing it. Now, peppers struggle in Greg's garden because the insect pressure is high, and he admitted that he doesn't pay enough attention to fertilizing them because he and Mrs.Hoss don't eat that many.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Brussel Sprouts have an extended date to maturity, and because of this, both Travis and Greg lose interest and end up not doing too well with this crop. You also need cold weather to trigger sprout growth, and that is something we don't get much of in South Georgia.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Some other things Travis struggles growing because it's not cold enough is Shallots. English Peas need in-between weather also to do well and again we don't get much of anything but hot here!! When it comes to field peas, we do a good job growing them as a cover crop, but when we raise them to eat, they get eaten up, and we can't seem to put enough fertilizer on them.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> The last thing Travis admitted struggling with was herbs. Herbs are something he wants to get into but just don't know enough about them yet. Growing herbs is one of his goals for this next ... Greg and Travis 39:50 Row By Row Episode 110: Taste Testing Our FAVORITE Tomato Varieties This Year https://hosstools.com/taste-testing-our-favorite-tomato-varieties-this-year/ Wed, 12 Aug 2020 20:55:10 +0000 https://hosstools.com/?p=130969 Tomato Taste Test This year we decided to grow over eight different tomato varieties, and they are finally slowing down on production. Hoss Tools is always looking for ways to improve and making sure we are offering the best seeds to our customers. After this extensive trial, we learned many different things about our tomatoes with one of those being none of our varieties are losers. We compared everything from heirlooms, Open-pollinated, and paste tomatoes. With a blindfold around his eyes, Mr.Hoss himself taste-tested every tomato. Based just on taste, he gave our Black Krim tomato the best score. The Black Krim is an heirloom tomato, and though it is not a dependable plant because of its lack of resistant characteristics, it is still one of the best-tasting tomatoes. Red Snapper, Summer Pick, and Homestead follow closely behind Black Krim when it comes to taste. Where they lack bold flavors, they make up for it with their beneficial characteristics. The Red Snapper is an all-time favorite for Travis, but one Greg has never grown before. The Red Snapper makes a meaty tomato with a significant disease-resistant package and is one vigorous plant. The Summer Pick Tomato is another seed that makes one big tomato. This variety is known for its high productivity as it made the second-largest harvest out of all the tomatoes. Our Homestead Tomato is our most vigorous plant and can withstand many things and taste pretty dang good. Ranking Our Tomato Varieties Though in Greg's eyes, those were the four best tasting tomatoes, we still have many varieties that give you excellent flavor and useful characteristics. One of those being the Chef's Choice Orange Tomato, this is an orange tomato that is rather large and is perfect for those BLT's. Bella Rosa is a remarkable all-around plant. On a scale based just on taste, Greg gave it a 3.9 out of 5, but where it doesn't compare to the others is its productivity. The Bella Rosa is our most productive tomato, with its plant staying at a manageable height. For our gardeners that enjoy growing tomatoes in a container, this one is for you!! The Brickyard tomato is one of our new varieties, but one we will grow again. This plant produced a large size tomato following behind the Red Snapper. Show and Tell Segment This South Georgia heat may be getting too hot to garden, but our crops are still producing. This week there is plenty to snack on between our okra, tomatoes, and figs. One of the things we trialed in the garden this year was the Jambalaya Okra right next to the Heavy Hitter. The Jambalaya is one of our tried and true varieties, but we are always wanting to compare it to other types making sure we can offer the best seeds to our customers. The Jambalaya is one of our most expensive seeds, but it proved itself once again. This Heavy Hitter is an open-pollinated variety many of our customers enjoy growing. Still, compared to the Jambalaya, it just didn't hold a light when it came to productivity, the size of the pod, or how fast it germinated. Also, don't forget Hoss Tools is looking for customer testimonial videos to use, and we would love to hear from you about how you enjoy our products or videos! Another thing you can do to help us out is to submit recipes to see if they make the cut for the Hoss Tools recipe book, which is in the making. You can send those recipes to our e-mail or mail them in! Question and Answer Segment As always, we are here to answer your questions, and today we were asked some good ones. The first question one of our viewers asked was about something we just started doing this year. Succession planting sweet corn, he asked if it was too late to do one more crop? Though we are waiting until late August for another crop, the guys at Hoss Tools believe you can plant sweet corn throughout the summer as long as you have adequate irrigation and fertilizer. Back to tomatoes, we had someone ask about leaf curl and what cou... Tomato Taste Test This year we decided to grow over eight different tomato varieties, and they are finally slowing down on production. Hoss Tools is always looking for ways to improve and making sure we are offering the best seeds to our customers. Tomato Taste Test<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> This year we decided to grow over eight different tomato varieties, and they are finally slowing down on production. Hoss Tools is always looking for ways to improve and making sure we are offering the best seeds to our customers. After this extensive trial, we learned many different things about our tomatoes with one of those being none of our varieties are losers. We compared everything from heirlooms, Open-pollinated, and paste tomatoes.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> With a blindfold around his eyes, Mr.Hoss himself taste-tested every tomato. Based just on taste, he gave our Black Krim tomato the best score. The Black Krim is an heirloom tomato, and though it is not a dependable plant because of its lack of resistant characteristics, it is still one of the best-tasting tomatoes.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Red Snapper, Summer Pick, and Homestead follow closely behind Black Krim when it comes to taste. Where they lack bold flavors, they make up for it with their beneficial characteristics. The Red Snapper is an all-time favorite for Travis, but one Greg has never grown before. The Red Snapper makes a meaty tomato with a significant disease-resistant package and is one vigorous plant.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> The Summer Pick Tomato is another seed that makes one big tomato. This variety is known for its high productivity as it made the second-largest harvest out of all the tomatoes. Our Homestead Tomato is our most vigorous plant and can withstand many things and taste pretty dang good.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Ranking Our Tomato Varieties <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Though in Greg's eyes, those were the four best tasting tomatoes, we still have many varieties that give you excellent flavor and useful characteristics. One of those being the Chef's Choice Orange Tomato, this is an orange tomato that is rather large and is perfect for those BLT's.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Bella Rosa is a remarkable all-around plant. On a scale based just on taste, Greg gave it a 3.9 out of 5, but where it doesn't compare to the others is its productivity. The Bella Rosa is our most productive tomato, with its plant staying at a manageable height. For our gardeners that enjoy growing tomatoes in a container, this one is for you!!<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> The Brickyard tomato is one of our new varieties, but one we will grow again. This plant produced a large size tomato following behind the Red Snapper.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Show and Tell Segment <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> This South Georgia heat may be getting too hot to garden, but our crops are still producing. This week there is plenty to snack on between our okra, tomatoes, and figs. One of the things we trialed in the garden this year was the Jambalaya Okra right next to the Heavy Hitter.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> The Jambalaya is one of our tried and true varieties, but we are always wanting to compare it to other types making sure we can offer the best seeds to our customers. The Jambalaya is one of our most expensive seeds, but it proved itself once again. This Heavy Hitter is an open-pollinated variety many of our customers enjoy growing. Still, compared to the Jambalaya, it just didn't hold a light when it came to productivity, the size of the pod, or how fast it germinated.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Also, don't forget Hoss Tools is looking for customer testimonial videos to use, and we would love to hear from you about how you enjoy our products or videos! Another thing you can do to help us out is to submit recipes to see if they make the cut for the Hoss Tools recipe book, which is in the making. You can send those recipes to our e-mail or mail them in!<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Question and Answer Segment <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> As always, we are here to answer your questions, and today we were asked some good ones. The first question one of our viewers asked was about something we just started doing this year. Greg and Travis 46:34 Row By Row Episode 109: Benefits of Warm-Season Cover Crops in The Vegetable Garden https://hosstools.com/benefits-of-warm-season-cover-crops-in-the-vegetable-gardeen/ Thu, 30 Jul 2020 16:19:51 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=127387 The Benefits of Cover Crops Being in Zone 8, we must plant warm-season cover crops to ensure that we will have a successful vegetable garden. Zone 8 contains South West Georgia, which is where Hoss Tools is located. With our warmer temperatures throughout the year, we can push our soils to the limits. Pushing our land creates a greater need for adding that nutrients and pH back to the ground, and warm-season cover crops are perfect for that job. As many gardeners know, it is essential to rotate your crops in one plot. For example, if one season you plant peppers, you don't want to follow it up the next season with peppers because they will not do as well. The soil will be missing the specific nutrients those peppers need. With planting cover crops, they will add those nutrients back into the ground in between plantings. Cover crops make crop rotation less critical. A rule of thumb we at Hoss Tools like to go by is making sure we put as least amount of input into our cover crops. Cover crops are meant to be an easy crop planted between you Summer and Fall vegetable gardens that will give you a higher output with less input. You don't want to add a lot to something that is supposed to be benefiting you. Such as, we don't fertilize our cover crops or put them on drip irrigation. We save those things for our cash crops!! Our Favorite Warm-Season Cover Crops There are four warm-season cover crops we believe will take your soil to the next level. Each cover-crop focuses on adding something different to your land and can be combined to make sure they meet your garden's specific needs. Sorghum Sudangrass- This cover crop is a monocot that is easy to mow and improves soil drainage. It also provides nematode suppression and adds excellent green manure.Brown Top Millet- This is our other monocot cover crop that matures in 60-70 days. This Brown Top Millet is excellent for sandy soils and is heat and drought tolerant.Sunn Hemp- A perfect nitrogen-fixer!! This specific cover crop is great for following heavy-feeding crops like corn, and it also suppresses nematodes.Buckwheat- Buckwheat is the fastest maturing out of the following as it grows in 30-50 days. Bees love this crop, and it helps break pests and disease cycles!Iron Clay Peas- These peas are easy to incorporate, and they attract beneficial insects to the garden. Maturing in 80-90 days, it also is a nitrogen-fixer and suppresses weeds. Show and Tell Segment It has been a season of excitement around Hoss Tools, and on this week's Row by Row show, we announced another reason to continue watching, we are creating a cookbook!! This recipe book will contain our customer's recipes and a mix of our own. Each submission will center around something that we can grow in the vegetable garden! It wouldn't be a Hoss Tools announcement though if we weren't snacking on something yummy! This week it was the Sangria Watermelon, Greg picked these earlier this week, and this variety might be one of his new favorites. One recipe we want to add to the Hoss Cook Book will be our famous BLT! This week our Chef's Choice Orange Tomato is at the perfect ripeness, and we cut some big juicy slices to make the BEST BLT! This tomato variety offers many other colors, and we look forward to adding them to the site soon since these were such a winner! Question and Answer Segment As always, we want to answer some of our viewer's questions. We understand that gardening can be intimidating, and even if you've been doing it for years, there will be things where you need help. This week one of our questions asked about curing winter squash. Greg explained that not all winter squash has to be cured and stored. The ones that do, though, you want to place out of the sun in a cool, dry area, just as you would potatoes and onions. We then had two viewers ask for some seed recommendations. Joy Rocks wanted to know if we had a speckled butter bean, The Benefits of Cover Crops Being in Zone 8, we must plant warm-season cover crops to ensure that we will have a successful vegetable garden. Zone 8 contains South West Georgia, which is where Hoss Tools is located. The Benefits of Cover Crops <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Being in Zone 8, we must plant warm-season cover crops to ensure that we will have a successful vegetable garden. Zone 8 contains South West Georgia, which is where Hoss Tools is located. With our warmer temperatures throughout the year, we can push our soils to the limits. Pushing our land creates a greater need for adding that nutrients and pH back to the ground, and warm-season cover crops are perfect for that job. <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> As many gardeners know, it is essential to rotate your crops in one plot. For example, if one season you plant peppers, you don't want to follow it up the next season with peppers because they will not do as well. The soil will be missing the specific nutrients those peppers need. With planting cover crops, they will add those nutrients back into the ground in between plantings. Cover crops make crop rotation less critical. <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> A rule of thumb we at Hoss Tools like to go by is making sure we put as least amount of input into our cover crops. Cover crops are meant to be an easy crop planted between you Summer and Fall vegetable gardens that will give you a higher output with less input. You don't want to add a lot to something that is supposed to be benefiting you. Such as, we don't fertilize our cover crops or put them on drip irrigation. We save those things for our cash crops!!<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Our Favorite Warm-Season Cover Crops<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> There are four warm-season cover crops we believe will take your soil to the next level. Each cover-crop focuses on adding something different to your land and can be combined to make sure they meet your garden's specific needs.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Sorghum Sudangrass- This cover crop is a monocot that is easy to mow and improves soil drainage. It also provides nematode suppression and adds excellent green manure.Brown Top Millet- This is our other monocot cover crop that matures in 60-70 days. This Brown Top Millet is excellent for sandy soils and is heat and drought tolerant.Sunn Hemp- A perfect nitrogen-fixer!! This specific cover crop is great for following heavy-feeding crops like corn, and it also suppresses nematodes.Buckwheat- Buckwheat is the fastest maturing out of the following as it grows in 30-50 days. Bees love this crop, and it helps break pests and disease cycles!Iron Clay Peas- These peas are easy to incorporate, and they attract beneficial insects to the garden. Maturing in 80-90 days, it also is a nitrogen-fixer and suppresses weeds.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> It has been a season of excitement around Hoss Tools, and on this week's Row by Row show, we announced another reason to continue watching, we are creating a cookbook!! This recipe book will contain our customer's recipes and a mix of our own. Each submission will center around something that we can grow in the vegetable garden! It wouldn't be a Hoss Tools announcement though if we weren't snacking on something yummy! This week it was the Sangria Watermelon, Greg picked these earlier this week, and this variety might be one of his new favorites.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> One recipe we want to add to the Hoss Cook Book will be our famous BLT! This week our Chef's Choice Orange Tomato is at the perfect ripeness, and we cut some big juicy slices to make the BEST BLT! This tomato variety offers many other colors, and we look forward to adding them to the site soon since these were such a winner!<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Question and Answer Segment<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> As always, we want to answer some of our viewer's questions. We understand that gardening can be intimidating, and even if you've been doing it for years, there will be things where you need help. This week one of our questions asked about curing winter squash. Greg explained that not all winter squash has to be c... Greg and Travis 46:40 Row by Row Episode 108: Tips for Growing Tomatoes and Other Popular Vegetables https://hosstools.com/tips-for-growing-tomatoes-and-other-popular-vegetables/ Thu, 16 Jul 2020 20:28:07 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=124984 Answering All Things Tomatoes Whether you are a first-time gardener or have been doing this for years, you're always going to have questions. Tomatoes are a popular vegetable in the garden, and this week Travis and Greg wanted to take some time to answer some of those viewer questions about tomatoes and other popular crops to help you better grow your own food. Our first question was simple, How does it taste? One of our viewers wondered what the flavor was like on our Red Snapper Tomato. Travis and Greg both agreed it was delicious even before it is all the way ripe. Another benefit of the Red Snapper is its size, growing as big as the palm of your hand. Tomatoes are great for our backyard gardeners who are working with a small area. Compared to corn that needs many plants to achieve the cross-pollination, tomatoes and peppers do great for our small-scale customers. Doing just a few plants of these will still give you a plentiful harvest.  Taking care of tomatoes can be very simple if they are trellised, there are many different options with trellising and one we like is this netting called the Hortonova Trellis. This trellis is excellent for smaller crops such as tomatoes and cucumbers but probably won't do the best holding up things such as a Butternut Squash; you might want to leave those to the cow panels. When growing cherry tomatoes, one common question is should you prune or leave them alone, and our tip is to leave them alone! Cherry Tomatoes down here in the South face a lot of heat and disease pressure anyway towards the end, so we just let them run their course! Other Vegetable Garden Tips There is a lot that goes into growing a successful vegetable garden besides throwing some seeds in the ground. Cover crops are one of those things that help take your garden to the next level. Cover crops are things you plant in between Summer and Fall gardens to treat your soil. Every soil has different needs, but one cover crop you can't go wrong with is Buck Wheat. Backyard gardeners, you are doing your soil a disadvantage if you aren't planting this in your offseason. For our gardeners that plant in raised beds, you may think cover cropping isn't for you, but it is still possible! Plant your cover crop as usual, and when it is time to get it up, go in there with a weed eater and take it down. You can then tarp it or go in with a digging fork to mix it in with your soil. This little trick will help your garden even in raised beds.  Another way to take your garden to the next level is fertilizing; for example, one of our viewers wanted to know how they should feed their corn. For Sweet Corn, going in with Micro Boost and 20-20-20 will help, then right before it tassels give it a little Fish and Guano, and you should have one of your best corn harvests yet!  Now, how do you apply that fertilizer? There are two main methods, soil drench, and a foliar feed. Foliar feeding is applying the fertilizer to the leaf and plant directly, which is great for short-term and cosmetic problems. Soil drenching is where you apply the fertilizer to the soil around the plant; this method is great for the long term health of the crop and is our favorite method.  Show and Tell Segment At Hoss Tools, we believe in getting the most out of our gardens by succession planting. That means seeing which plants we can push to the limits as we get into these hot summer months. During our show and tell segment this week, we discussed some of the things we have been succession planting, such as Slick Pik Yellow Squash! This variety is a hybrid that produces early, often, and with high yields—making this squash great for your trying Summer months.  The Algonquin Squash is a very rare winter squash. The guys at Hoss Tools have been growing. Because there isn't much information out there on it, they were very excited to finally be able to harvest it and give it a taste test. Mr.Greg let everyone know that it passed the test with flying colors, Answering All Things Tomatoes Whether you are a first-time gardener or have been doing this for years, you're always going to have questions. Tomatoes are a popular vegetable in the garden, and this week Travis and Greg wanted to take some time to answ... Answering All Things Tomatoes<br /> Whether you are a first-time gardener or have been doing this for years, you're always going to have questions. Tomatoes are a popular vegetable in the garden, and this week Travis and Greg wanted to take some time to answer some of those viewer questions about tomatoes and other popular crops to help you better grow your own food.<br /> <br /> Our first question was simple, How does it taste? One of our viewers wondered what the flavor was like on our Red Snapper Tomato. Travis and Greg both agreed it was delicious even before it is all the way ripe. Another benefit of the Red Snapper is its size, growing as big as the palm of your hand.<br /> <br /> Tomatoes are great for our backyard gardeners who are working with a small area. Compared to corn that needs many plants to achieve the cross-pollination, tomatoes and peppers do great for our small-scale customers. Doing just a few plants of these will still give you a plentiful harvest. <br /> <br /> Taking care of tomatoes can be very simple if they are trellised, there are many different options with trellising and one we like is this netting called the Hortonova Trellis. This trellis is excellent for smaller crops such as tomatoes and cucumbers but probably won't do the best holding up things such as a Butternut Squash; you might want to leave those to the cow panels. When growing cherry tomatoes, one common question is should you prune or leave them alone, and our tip is to leave them alone! Cherry Tomatoes down here in the South face a lot of heat and disease pressure anyway towards the end, so we just let them run their course!<br /> Other Vegetable Garden Tips<br /> There is a lot that goes into growing a successful vegetable garden besides throwing some seeds in the ground. Cover crops are one of those things that help take your garden to the next level. Cover crops are things you plant in between Summer and Fall gardens to treat your soil. Every soil has different needs, but one cover crop you can't go wrong with is Buck Wheat. Backyard gardeners, you are doing your soil a disadvantage if you aren't planting this in your offseason.<br /> <br /> For our gardeners that plant in raised beds, you may think cover cropping isn't for you, but it is still possible! Plant your cover crop as usual, and when it is time to get it up, go in there with a weed eater and take it down. You can then tarp it or go in with a digging fork to mix it in with your soil. This little trick will help your garden even in raised beds. <br /> <br /> Another way to take your garden to the next level is fertilizing; for example, one of our viewers wanted to know how they should feed their corn. For Sweet Corn, going in with Micro Boost and 20-20-20 will help, then right before it tassels give it a little Fish and Guano, and you should have one of your best corn harvests yet! <br /> <br /> Now, how do you apply that fertilizer? There are two main methods, soil drench, and a foliar feed. Foliar feeding is applying the fertilizer to the leaf and plant directly, which is great for short-term and cosmetic problems. Soil drenching is where you apply the fertilizer to the soil around the plant; this method is great for the long term health of the crop and is our favorite method. <br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> At Hoss Tools, we believe in getting the most out of our gardens by succession planting. That means seeing which plants we can push to the limits as we get into these hot summer months. During our show and tell segment this week, we discussed some of the things we have been succession planting, such as Slick Pik Yellow Squash! This variety is a hybrid that produces early, often, and with high yields—making this squash great for your trying Summer months. <br /> <br /> The Algonquin Squash is a very rare winter squash. The guys at Hoss Tools have been growing. Because there isn't much information out there on it, they were very excited to finally be able to har... Greg and Travis 43:37 Row by Row Episode 107: What Hoss Tools Considers Vegetable Garden Winners https://hosstools.com/what-hoss-tools-considers-vegetable-garden-winners/ Wed, 08 Jul 2020 20:24:35 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=120865 Travis's Vegetable Garden Winners Since Hoss Tools has been in the seed selling business, and even way before, we have seen many seeds that we consider vegetable garden winners and many seeds we do not. Over the years, we have had opportunities to try all kinds of vegetable garden seeds, and as this year's summer garden is coming to an end, we sit down and talk about what has blown us away this year. We based these top 6 on how well they produced and how we benefited by having them in our garden, whether that was by looks or by just tasting good!! 1. Gold Star Squash 2. Avalon Triple Sweet Corn 3. Red Snapper Tomato 4. Marigold Sparky Mix Flowers 5. South Anna Butternut Squash 6. Max Pack Cucumber Greg's Vegetable Garden Winners For Greg's chosen winners, he decided by basing it on, would he grow it again? For all of the following, the answer is YES! Two of his top 6 are seeds that Hoss Tools doesn't offer yet as we like to trial everything ourselves before selling them to our customers. The Algonquin Squash and The Gold-lite Sunflower passed the test. 1.Calendula Prince Mix 2. Guinea Onion 3. Black Krim Tomato 4. Algonquin Squash 5. Marketmore Cucumber 6. Gold-lite Sun Flower Show and Tell Segment It is a great time to live in South Georgia as our weather has been perfect to finish out our Summer season. These cool afternoons and mornings make for some enjoyable harvest time. One thing many of us have been busy harvesting is corn, Greg brought in some of his Hickory King White Corn which is field corn he enjoys eating. Though many don't think of field corn as a snack, it can be quite tasty, another benefit of field corn is that it isn't as prone to get worms.  After checking out Greg's snack Travis brought out his Max Pack Pickles. This recipe was different from his last batch of fermented cucumbers because he used spheres and flavored it with hard spice and garlic cloves. He also only left them in the crock for six days, these few changes led to the pickles being a lot crunchier! Viewer Questions On this week's show, we had some excellent questions from our viewers. Our first question centered around what would be the best crops to grow in raised beds? This viewer explicitly needed for a fall garden, and a few of our suggestions include Beets, Broccoli, Cabbage, Collards, Kale, Onions, Radishes, and especially Elephant Garlic. These Fall crops will do great in raised beds because of the lack of space they take up, compared to vining plants such as Pumpkins.  One plant that has a lot of vines are Sweet Potatoes, and our viewer Jeremy wondered, was he suppose to let the vines run wild or try and contain them in a row? Speaking from experience, our guys let Jeremey know that he does not need to hassle with trying to keep them in a row but instead trim on the edges, keeping them contained to their plot. The next question asked, do you need to fertilize cover crops? Our answer was simple, NO! As Greg put it, you want to get the most gain out of a cover crop. Therefore, you don't want to worry about fertilizing it. Just give it some water and let it go!  Many of our other crops do need fertilizer, and one of our best sellers is Micro Boost, but how do you apply it to individual veggies in a small backyard garden? For a foliage spray, we suggest 2 ounces per gallon. You can mix that up and use a simple sprayer or cup. We want our growers to understand you don't need a watering system to fertilize!  With some of our summer crops having such short harvest windows, it can be tricky making sure you get everything picked the day it's supposed to and at the correct time. Our gardeners wanted to know Travis and Greg's opinion on what can be harvested mid-day? One of our rules of thumb is if you can get it in the shade soon, then it doesn't matter what time of day. Travis even suggests for things like beets and carrots you wash off outside, Travis's Vegetable Garden Winners Since Hoss Tools has been in the seed selling business, and even way before, we have seen many seeds that we consider vegetable garden winners and many seeds we do not. Over the years, Travis's Vegetable Garden Winners<br /> Since Hoss Tools has been in the seed selling business, and even way before, we have seen many seeds that we consider vegetable garden winners and many seeds we do not. Over the years, we have had opportunities to try all kinds of vegetable garden seeds, and as this year's summer garden is coming to an end, we sit down and talk about what has blown us away this year. We based these top 6 on how well they produced and how we benefited by having them in our garden, whether that was by looks or by just tasting good!!<br /> <br /> 1. Gold Star Squash<br /> <br /> 2. Avalon Triple Sweet Corn<br /> <br /> 3. Red Snapper Tomato<br /> <br /> 4. Marigold Sparky Mix Flowers<br /> <br /> 5. South Anna Butternut Squash<br /> <br /> 6. Max Pack Cucumber<br /> Greg's Vegetable Garden Winners<br /> For Greg's chosen winners, he decided by basing it on, would he grow it again? For all of the following, the answer is YES! Two of his top 6 are seeds that Hoss Tools doesn't offer yet as we like to trial everything ourselves before selling them to our customers. The Algonquin Squash and The Gold-lite Sunflower passed the test.<br /> <br /> 1.Calendula Prince Mix<br /> <br /> 2. Guinea Onion<br /> <br /> 3. Black Krim Tomato<br /> <br /> 4. Algonquin Squash<br /> <br /> 5. Marketmore Cucumber<br /> <br /> 6. Gold-lite Sun Flower<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> It is a great time to live in South Georgia as our weather has been perfect to finish out our Summer season. These cool afternoons and mornings make for some enjoyable harvest time. One thing many of us have been busy harvesting is corn, Greg brought in some of his Hickory King White Corn which is field corn he enjoys eating. Though many don't think of field corn as a snack, it can be quite tasty, another benefit of field corn is that it isn't as prone to get worms. <br /> <br /> After checking out Greg's snack Travis brought out his Max Pack Pickles. This recipe was different from his last batch of fermented cucumbers because he used spheres and flavored it with hard spice and garlic cloves. He also only left them in the crock for six days, these few changes led to the pickles being a lot crunchier!<br /> Viewer Questions<br /> On this week's show, we had some excellent questions from our viewers. Our first question centered around what would be the best crops to grow in raised beds? This viewer explicitly needed for a fall garden, and a few of our suggestions include Beets, Broccoli, Cabbage, Collards, Kale, Onions, Radishes, and especially Elephant Garlic. These Fall crops will do great in raised beds because of the lack of space they take up, compared to vining plants such as Pumpkins. <br /> <br /> One plant that has a lot of vines are Sweet Potatoes, and our viewer Jeremy wondered, was he suppose to let the vines run wild or try and contain them in a row? Speaking from experience, our guys let Jeremey know that he does not need to hassle with trying to keep them in a row but instead trim on the edges, keeping them contained to their plot.<br /> <br /> The next question asked, do you need to fertilize cover crops? Our answer was simple, NO! As Greg put it, you want to get the most gain out of a cover crop. Therefore, you don't want to worry about fertilizing it. Just give it some water and let it go! <br /> <br /> Many of our other crops do need fertilizer, and one of our best sellers is Micro Boost, but how do you apply it to individual veggies in a small backyard garden? For a foliage spray, we suggest 2 ounces per gallon. You can mix that up and use a simple sprayer or cup. We want our growers to understand you don't need a watering system to fertilize! <br /> <br /> With some of our summer crops having such short harvest windows, it can be tricky making sure you get everything picked the day it's supposed to and at the correct time. Our gardeners wanted to know Travis and Greg's opinion on what can... Greg and Travis 54:54 Row By Row Episode 106: Growing the BEST Sweet Potato Plant in your Backyard! https://hosstools.com/growing-the-best-sweet-potato-plant-in-your-backyard/ Wed, 17 Jun 2020 19:07:10 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=119804 Simple Tips to Grow a Sweet Potato Plant Many people will say that a sweet potato is the easiest plant to grow but won't include the steps to make it the successful maintenance-free crop it's meant to be. Here at Hoss Tools, we want to help you grow your own food, so this is what we do to make sure we have a successful sweet potato harvest. With any crop, it starts from the beginning. At Hoss Tools, we order sweet potato slips, which are different from a draw. A draw grows from the vine where a slip gets picked from the sprout of a sweet potato plant.  We have to make sure our soil is ready to have plants in it by digging our rows, and we suggest planting sweet potato rows three feet apart and 12 inches between each seed. You want to plant these slips in soil that has been tilled well and has good drainage. The pH is always essential, and we have seen that they do best in soils with a pH level of 5.8-6.  For fertilizing your sweet potatoes pre-plant or post, it is vital that you keep it low in nitrogen and high in phosphorous and potassium. Keeping the nitrogen down will help you grow fewer vines and instead focus on the roots. Travis likes to put complete organic hen manure on his sweet potatoes about a week before he plants and then thirty days after when he is hilling the potatoes.  Our Favorite Sweet Potato Varieties  We have grown many varieties of sweet potatoes, including the Centennial, the Covington, the Bearugaurd, and the Georgia Jet. We have seen many benefits in all of them, including the Georgia Jet, being the tastiest sweet potato with a short growing season, the Bearugaurd having excellent nematode resistance, and the Covington being the prettiest plant.  Picking a variety that works for you depends solely on what you are looking for and how your growing season is. For someone up north looking for a quick potato that Georgia Jet might be best, whereas someone just looking for a pretty plant would choose the Covington.  Show and Tell Segment Sweet corn is ready to harvest, so Travis brought in some for Greg to try, and if you don't like watching them eat on the show, you might want to skip the first half. With just some butter and salt, this sweet corn was delicious!! Greg didn't want to praise it too much until Travis gets some of his though, but Greg's is about ten days behind Travis's. We all love some friendly garden competition. If you watched any of our social media videos this past week, you might have heard Travis talk about his Tomato disaster that occurred from all the rain. Travis's tomatoes fell slap over on to the next row when his T-posts started to move around in the wet soil. It's not a bad problem to have such a big harvest that your posts can't hold up. Thankfully Travis was able to save the row with not many tomatoes lost. Hoss Tools has some exciting things coming in the next few weeks, including a product that is frequently asked for, T-shirts!! Be on the lookout for a Row by Row Garden Show T-shirt on the website soon and maybe even some more designs. As the guys wrapped up their first segment, they ask our viewers for some help! Hoss Tools wants to use real customer testimonials to compile a video to use as promotion, help them out by checking out the link in the latest Row By Row show! Viewer Questions Tim Jones started us off with a mind-boggling question of how do seeds know up from down?? Travis had to think back to his botany class days but then taught us that it has to do a lot with gravity and sunlight. When the seed is in the ground, it tells by the gravitational pull, and once they get blooms on them, they will grow towards the sun. After that we had a viewer ask us why we aren't growing Dahlias, Greg then informed us that he has a current trial going on with Dahlias trying to learn more about them as they are hard to grow down here in the southern heat. Along with that question, we had another viewer ask about flowers. Simple Tips to Grow a Sweet Potato Plant Many people will say that a sweet potato is the easiest plant to grow but won't include the steps to make it the successful maintenance-free crop it's meant to be. Here at Hoss Tools, Simple Tips to Grow a Sweet Potato Plant<br /> Many people will say that a sweet potato is the easiest plant to grow but won't include the steps to make it the successful maintenance-free crop it's meant to be. Here at Hoss Tools, we want to help you grow your own food, so this is what we do to make sure we have a successful sweet potato harvest. With any crop, it starts from the beginning. At Hoss Tools, we order sweet potato slips, which are different from a draw. A draw grows from the vine where a slip gets picked from the sprout of a sweet potato plant. <br /> <br /> We have to make sure our soil is ready to have plants in it by digging our rows, and we suggest planting sweet potato rows three feet apart and 12 inches between each seed. You want to plant these slips in soil that has been tilled well and has good drainage. The pH is always essential, and we have seen that they do best in soils with a pH level of 5.8-6. <br /> <br /> For fertilizing your sweet potatoes pre-plant or post, it is vital that you keep it low in nitrogen and high in phosphorous and potassium. Keeping the nitrogen down will help you grow fewer vines and instead focus on the roots. Travis likes to put complete organic hen manure on his sweet potatoes about a week before he plants and then thirty days after when he is hilling the potatoes. <br /> Our Favorite Sweet Potato Varieties <br /> We have grown many varieties of sweet potatoes, including the Centennial, the Covington, the Bearugaurd, and the Georgia Jet. We have seen many benefits in all of them, including the Georgia Jet, being the tastiest sweet potato with a short growing season, the Bearugaurd having excellent nematode resistance, and the Covington being the prettiest plant. <br /> <br /> Picking a variety that works for you depends solely on what you are looking for and how your growing season is. For someone up north looking for a quick potato that Georgia Jet might be best, whereas someone just looking for a pretty plant would choose the Covington. <br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> Sweet corn is ready to harvest, so Travis brought in some for Greg to try, and if you don't like watching them eat on the show, you might want to skip the first half. With just some butter and salt, this sweet corn was delicious!! Greg didn't want to praise it too much until Travis gets some of his though, but Greg's is about ten days behind Travis's. We all love some friendly garden competition.<br /> <br /> If you watched any of our social media videos this past week, you might have heard Travis talk about his Tomato disaster that occurred from all the rain. Travis's tomatoes fell slap over on to the next row when his T-posts started to move around in the wet soil. It's not a bad problem to have such a big harvest that your posts can't hold up. Thankfully Travis was able to save the row with not many tomatoes lost.<br /> <br /> Hoss Tools has some exciting things coming in the next few weeks, including a product that is frequently asked for, T-shirts!! Be on the lookout for a Row by Row Garden Show T-shirt on the website soon and maybe even some more designs. As the guys wrapped up their first segment, they ask our viewers for some help! Hoss Tools wants to use real customer testimonials to compile a video to use as promotion, help them out by checking out the link in the latest Row By Row show!<br /> Viewer Questions<br /> Tim Jones started us off with a mind-boggling question of how do seeds know up from down?? Travis had to think back to his botany class days but then taught us that it has to do a lot with gravity and sunlight. When the seed is in the ground, it tells by the gravitational pull, and once they get blooms on them, they will grow towards the sun. After that we had a viewer ask us why we aren't growing Dahlias, Greg then informed us that he has a current trial going on with Dahlias trying to learn more about them as they are hard to grow down here in the southern heat. Greg and Travis 48:45 Row by Row Episode 105: Our Favorite Flowers in the Vegetable Garden https://hosstools.com/our-favorite-flowers-in-the-vegetable-garden/ Mon, 08 Jun 2020 20:00:32 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=116769 Attracting Pollinators with our Flowers in the Garden As we are all starting to wind down the spring garden and begin preparing for the fall, most of us don't consider planting flowers in the vegetable garden. Besides their outward appearance, flowers can bring many benefits to the garden. With the weather right now, Greg suggested that though you can still plant Okra and Sweet Potatoes and get a good harvest, that's about it. The time has come to begin planting our cover crops and preparing our soil for the future.  One of the apparent benefits of Flowers is there ability to attract pollinators. If you already have a hive planting fresh flowers for them will feed them well. If you don't have a colony, this flower garden will draw in the natural ones. Flowers also bring in beneficial insects such as butterflies. These beneficial insects will then help keep down your pest pressure and keep away the harmful insects. Remember, not all bugs are bad.  Flowers of any kind can lift anybody's spirits when needed. If you are having a bad day or you and your woman are fighting, all you have to do is take a walk around the garden or cut you a lovely bouquet, and that will put a smile on anyone's face.  Favorite Varieties of Flowers for the Vegetable Garden Growing flowers in the vegetable garden are something we never leave out. One of our tried and true flower varieties is our ProCut Sunflowers. These are perfect for the bouquets and anything you want to take inside because they are pollen-less. Pollen-less means that even when you shake them around, no yellow specks will fall, making them great for indoors. Also though they are pollen-less, that doesn't stop the bees from swarming all around. If you want a sunflower that isn't as expensive and doesn't have to be planted as meticulous, some of the varieties we suggest are Chocolate Cherry, Autumn Beauty, Teddy Bear, and Santa Fe Sunset. These few sunflowers are gorgeous and can be mixed to grow a plot full! Sunflowers are perfect for a warm-season cover crop.  Our next favorite flower is the Benary Giant. The seed is a Zinnia and is one of the biggest blooms in any variety. Not only is it big and beautiful, but it makes for a perfect cut flower because of its plant structure. At Hoss Tools, we sell many of the Benary Giant Zinnias separately, but we also sell them in mixes. Putting the Benary Giant Zinnia Mix in your garden will bring it life like never before. When you are done and picked all the flowers, you would like you can cut them down and mow it into the plots giving it proper nutrients.  Show and Tell Segment On the Row by Row Garden Show, we love starting with something to eat. This week Travis brought in several mason jars full of his freshly fermented pickles. Fermenting vegetables is very popular, but something the guys at Hoss Tools haven't tried a lot. With the use of a big crock and many cucumbers, Travis topped them with some seasoning and let them sit. Both the guys loved the way they tasted and decided they will be doing this a lot more. They explained how this is simpler than canning because you don't have to steam or boil anything but instead let it sit and then pour into jars. If you are overflowing with vegetables in your garden and want to try something new, you can start fermenting with our simple Complete Fermentation Kit. After the guys stuffed their bellies with pickles, they started talking about the tallest thing in the garden right now, Sweet Corn. Our Sweet Corn varieties, Avalon and Hickory King are almost ready! Our pollen is dripping all over the newly formed silks meaning we will have corn real soon. Besides Sweet Corn, Hoss Tools also offers Field Corn seeds, and we got some new ones on the way. Lancaster Sure Crop Corn is one of our new varieties that is an heirloom with huge ears. The other new Field Corn variety is Reids Yellow Dent Corn, which is also an heirloom, but this one is drought-tolerant.  Viewer Questions Attracting Pollinators with our Flowers in the Garden As we are all starting to wind down the spring garden and begin preparing for the fall, most of us don't consider planting flowers in the vegetable garden. Besides their outward appearance, Attracting Pollinators with our Flowers in the Garden<br /> As we are all starting to wind down the spring garden and begin preparing for the fall, most of us don't consider planting flowers in the vegetable garden. Besides their outward appearance, flowers can bring many benefits to the garden. With the weather right now, Greg suggested that though you can still plant Okra and Sweet Potatoes and get a good harvest, that's about it. The time has come to begin planting our cover crops and preparing our soil for the future. <br /> <br /> One of the apparent benefits of Flowers is there ability to attract pollinators. If you already have a hive planting fresh flowers for them will feed them well. If you don't have a colony, this flower garden will draw in the natural ones. Flowers also bring in beneficial insects such as butterflies. These beneficial insects will then help keep down your pest pressure and keep away the harmful insects. Remember, not all bugs are bad. <br /> <br /> Flowers of any kind can lift anybody's spirits when needed. If you are having a bad day or you and your woman are fighting, all you have to do is take a walk around the garden or cut you a lovely bouquet, and that will put a smile on anyone's face. <br /> Favorite Varieties of Flowers for the Vegetable Garden<br /> Growing flowers in the vegetable garden are something we never leave out. One of our tried and true flower varieties is our ProCut Sunflowers. These are perfect for the bouquets and anything you want to take inside because they are pollen-less. Pollen-less means that even when you shake them around, no yellow specks will fall, making them great for indoors. Also though they are pollen-less, that doesn't stop the bees from swarming all around. If you want a sunflower that isn't as expensive and doesn't have to be planted as meticulous, some of the varieties we suggest are Chocolate Cherry, Autumn Beauty, Teddy Bear, and Santa Fe Sunset. These few sunflowers are gorgeous and can be mixed to grow a plot full! Sunflowers are perfect for a warm-season cover crop. <br /> <br /> Our next favorite flower is the Benary Giant. The seed is a Zinnia and is one of the biggest blooms in any variety. Not only is it big and beautiful, but it makes for a perfect cut flower because of its plant structure. At Hoss Tools, we sell many of the Benary Giant Zinnias separately, but we also sell them in mixes. Putting the Benary Giant Zinnia Mix in your garden will bring it life like never before. When you are done and picked all the flowers, you would like you can cut them down and mow it into the plots giving it proper nutrients. <br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the Row by Row Garden Show, we love starting with something to eat. This week Travis brought in several mason jars full of his freshly fermented pickles. Fermenting vegetables is very popular, but something the guys at Hoss Tools haven't tried a lot. With the use of a big crock and many cucumbers, Travis topped them with some seasoning and let them sit. Both the guys loved the way they tasted and decided they will be doing this a lot more. They explained how this is simpler than canning because you don't have to steam or boil anything but instead let it sit and then pour into jars. If you are overflowing with vegetables in your garden and want to try something new, you can start fermenting with our simple Complete Fermentation Kit.<br /> <br /> After the guys stuffed their bellies with pickles, they started talking about the tallest thing in the garden right now, Sweet Corn. Our Sweet Corn varieties, Avalon and Hickory King are almost ready! Our pollen is dripping all over the newly formed silks meaning we will have corn real soon. Besides Sweet Corn, Hoss Tools also offers Field Corn seeds, and we got some new ones on the way. Lancaster Sure Crop Corn is one of our new varieties that is an heirloom with huge ears. The other new Field Corn variety is Reids Yellow Dent Corn, Greg and Travis 45:41 Row By Row Episode 104: Organic Pest Control Programs for the Garden! https://hosstools.com/simple-pest-control-programs-for-the-garden/ Mon, 01 Jun 2020 15:26:01 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=115117 Preparing for your Pest Control Program As it is starting to warm up, preparing for pest control is a hot topic. Knowing what pest control program you should use is all about knowing was insect and disease pressures you face. Even Greg and Travis, who live in the same county, face different pest pressures and problems. It is essential when getting rid of pests to be proactive and start spraying before they show up. Some of the main pests the guys see here are Squash Bugs, Pickle Worms, Leaf-footed bugs, and Corn Earworm. Both Greg and Travis like to spray once a week, and if it starts to get worse, go in twice a week. They each pick a specific day and stuck to that schedule like Travis sprays every Sunday night. It would be best if you sprayed late afternoon or early morning, so your bees are not affected by the spraying. They both agree that their bees are active in the morning, so they choose to spray right as its getting dark, and the bees are going to sleep.  Insects and their eggs like to stay under the leaf, so it is crucial that when you spray, you get under the foliage and over the top for good coverage. With our organic sprays, you must get excellent coverage. A question a lot of gardeners ask is, when do I know I have sprayed enough per plant? Greg likes to use the run-off method. If you are spraying the plant and it is starting to run-off the leaves, then you have sprayed plenty, and you need to move on, or you are wasting money.  What Should your Pest Control Program Include?  For every good pest control program, it is vital to have a combination of insecticide and fungicide. Many people do not realize not only can you mix the two, but it is terrific for your plants to do so. All of the chemicals here at Hoss Tools have no problem mixing, but like always, it is imperative to read the pull-off label on the back. That label will also tell you how you are required by law to mix it and by what ratio.  Both Greg and Travis have two different combinations they alternate on their gardens. For week one, Travis goes in with spinosad, Garden Insect Spray, this chemical takes care of crawling and flying insects. He mixes in with that spinosad the Liquid Copper Fungicide. He notes that when mixing, he does them each individually then adds them together. For Travis's week two, he goes in with Monterey B t Spray to help take care of worms, moths, and caterpillars. The Bt gets mixed with the Take-Down Garden Spray, which will help take care of squash bugs and their eggs. The last chemical he adds in there is Complete Disease Control, which is a comprehensive organic fungicide.  Greg's pest control program consists of Liquid Copper Fungicide and Spinosad Garden Insect Spray for his first week, which is similar to Travis's. The Garden Insect Spray sticks to the leaf perfect, which is important if you spray before a rain shower. The Liquid Copper is great for early and late blight, which is something Greg's garden struggles having.  For week two, Greg goes in with a fungicide that is good for leaf spots and can be used to treat soil born diseases, Complete Disease Control. He mixes that with a not as well known spray named Fruit Tree Spray, don't let the name fool you though it works wonders on vegetable gardens as it is a combination of pyrethrin and neem oil. One last tip to remember if you are spraying something with oil if you are expecting to have a hot afternoon and you sprayed in the morning, you have a high likelihood your plants are going to burn.  Show and Tell Segment Exciting things are happening at Hoss Tools, including giveaways, T-shirts, new video segments, and new seed varieties. The giveaway will only happen if we hit 100K on Youtube by May 30th, and if we do, Hoss Tools will be selecting three winners to win gift cards up to $500!! The new video segments Travis spoke about are called Garden Goodies, which will be short videos on various things Greg or Travis want to show you or teac... Preparing for your Pest Control Program As it is starting to warm up, preparing for pest control is a hot topic. Knowing what pest control program you should use is all about knowing was insect and disease pressures you face. Even Greg and Travis, Preparing for your Pest Control Program<br /> As it is starting to warm up, preparing for pest control is a hot topic. Knowing what pest control program you should use is all about knowing was insect and disease pressures you face. Even Greg and Travis, who live in the same county, face different pest pressures and problems.<br /> <br /> It is essential when getting rid of pests to be proactive and start spraying before they show up. Some of the main pests the guys see here are Squash Bugs, Pickle Worms, Leaf-footed bugs, and Corn Earworm. Both Greg and Travis like to spray once a week, and if it starts to get worse, go in twice a week.<br /> <br /> They each pick a specific day and stuck to that schedule like Travis sprays every Sunday night. It would be best if you sprayed late afternoon or early morning, so your bees are not affected by the spraying. They both agree that their bees are active in the morning, so they choose to spray right as its getting dark, and the bees are going to sleep. <br /> <br /> Insects and their eggs like to stay under the leaf, so it is crucial that when you spray, you get under the foliage and over the top for good coverage. With our organic sprays, you must get excellent coverage. A question a lot of gardeners ask is, when do I know I have sprayed enough per plant? Greg likes to use the run-off method. If you are spraying the plant and it is starting to run-off the leaves, then you have sprayed plenty, and you need to move on, or you are wasting money. <br /> What Should your Pest Control Program Include? <br /> For every good pest control program, it is vital to have a combination of insecticide and fungicide. Many people do not realize not only can you mix the two, but it is terrific for your plants to do so. All of the chemicals here at Hoss Tools have no problem mixing, but like always, it is imperative to read the pull-off label on the back. That label will also tell you how you are required by law to mix it and by what ratio. <br /> <br /> Both Greg and Travis have two different combinations they alternate on their gardens. For week one, Travis goes in with spinosad, Garden Insect Spray, this chemical takes care of crawling and flying insects. He mixes in with that spinosad the Liquid Copper Fungicide. He notes that when mixing, he does them each individually then adds them together.<br /> <br /> For Travis's week two, he goes in with Monterey B t Spray to help take care of worms, moths, and caterpillars. The Bt gets mixed with the Take-Down Garden Spray, which will help take care of squash bugs and their eggs. The last chemical he adds in there is Complete Disease Control, which is a comprehensive organic fungicide. <br /> <br /> Greg's pest control program consists of Liquid Copper Fungicide and Spinosad Garden Insect Spray for his first week, which is similar to Travis's. The Garden Insect Spray sticks to the leaf perfect, which is important if you spray before a rain shower. The Liquid Copper is great for early and late blight, which is something Greg's garden struggles having. <br /> <br /> For week two, Greg goes in with a fungicide that is good for leaf spots and can be used to treat soil born diseases, Complete Disease Control. He mixes that with a not as well known spray named Fruit Tree Spray, don't let the name fool you though it works wonders on vegetable gardens as it is a combination of pyrethrin and neem oil. One last tip to remember if you are spraying something with oil if you are expecting to have a hot afternoon and you sprayed in the morning, you have a high likelihood your plants are going to burn. <br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> Exciting things are happening at Hoss Tools, including giveaways, T-shirts, new video segments, and new seed varieties. The giveaway will only happen if we hit 100K on Youtube by May 30th, and if we do, Hoss Tools will be selecting three winners to win gift cards up to $500!!<br /> <br /> Greg and Travis 51:23 Row By Row Episode 103: Comparing Onions and Potatoes https://hosstools.com/comparing-onions-and-potatoes/ Fri, 22 May 2020 19:02:49 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=113624 Comparing our Onions The guys were comparing onions and potatoes in this week's show, as Travis brought in three different types of onions. Red, yellow, and white, and they took a bite out of each! The red onion was the Red Creole onion that Hoss Tools carries, it was direct seeded into the ground, and it came up about a week before the other ones. The guys explained that they loved this type of onion on salads to give it some color. The next onion they compared was the Savannah Sweet onion, which is a yellow one and has more of a sugary taste compared to the other two. After looking at the onion, Greg and Travis agreed that they thought it was a semi-round. The last one they tried had the most bite to it and would have been a perfect pairing with a chili dog, and that was the white onion. Comparing our Potatoes After Greg's joke on Travis's potato growing abilities last week, Travis brought a bucket full of his potatoes in. They have been all about comparing their onions and potatoes. Travis's Yukon Gold potatoes were some of the biggest ones he has ever grown! Travis explained that he didn't put any fertilizer on his potatoes this year, but it was all about the cover crop cocktail he mixed up. The cocktail consisted of Hairy Vetch, Radishes, and Austrian Winter Peas, that mix fed his soil in just the right way to give him a bountiful harvest. Now that he has all these potatoes, they discussed how he was going to store them. If you go back to the video, you can see a shelf design Travis drew up that is perfect for storing and adding other layers too. You want to make sure that you are keeping your onions and potatoes in a cool, dark, and dry space as well as making sure they have plenty of room not to touch. If you have them too stacked on each other, that will cause them to rot. Show and Tell Segment If you are not a fan of good eating, you would not have enjoyed the first part of this week's show. Travis and Greg both brought in some great things to taste test, which even led to Travis being blindfolded and spoon-fed!! Greg made Travis try some of his pickled vegetables, including pickled squash. Greg also shouted out one of Mrs.Hoss's favorite Southern Living books and where she had gotten some of these recipes. The book was titled Little Jars Big Flavor. Pickling is a great resort to turn to when you have an abundance of harvest or want to save that taste for later. Travis also brought in some of his Max Pack variety of cucumbers and talked about how awesome they were doing and their excellent disease resistance. The guys also announced some new varieties were hitting the website, including Dewlectable Melons, Halo Canary Melons, and Alexandria Squash.  Viewer Questions Segment Here at Hoss Tools, we focus a lot on vegetables well our first viewer question was centered around our thoughts towards fruit trees. Travis and Greg listed the many fruit trees they both have at their homesteads, including a Granny Smith Apple tree, lime and lemon trees, a muscadine vine, and many fig trees. Greg then talked about his PlumCot tree, which is a cross between a plum and an apricot that was developed at the UGA research station. The next question we had a viewer ask about tips on Kohlrabi, Greg said that this was one of his favorite things to grow. He told her that it does not like the heat and does better in the cooler times of the year, he also said that Kohlrabi goes great in coleslaw as a substitute for cabbage. One of the last questions had to do with raised beds/container gardens and what mixture you would use in them. Travis urged not to use only compost because you need something just a little bit denser to hold the water, but instead to fill it about two-thirds of the way with topsoil, then top it off with compost. Then Greg reminded him that if you don't have access to good topsoil, you could even use peat moss. Product of the Week Japanese Hulless Popcorn Comparing our Onions The guys were comparing onions and potatoes in this week's show, as Travis brought in three different types of onions. Red, yellow, and white, and they took a bite out of each! The red onion was the Red Creole onion that Hoss Tool... Comparing our Onions<br /> The guys were comparing onions and potatoes in this week's show, as Travis brought in three different types of onions. Red, yellow, and white, and they took a bite out of each! The red onion was the Red Creole onion that Hoss Tools carries, it was direct seeded into the ground, and it came up about a week before the other ones. The guys explained that they loved this type of onion on salads to give it some color.<br /> <br /> The next onion they compared was the Savannah Sweet onion, which is a yellow one and has more of a sugary taste compared to the other two. After looking at the onion, Greg and Travis agreed that they thought it was a semi-round. The last one they tried had the most bite to it and would have been a perfect pairing with a chili dog, and that was the white onion.<br /> Comparing our Potatoes<br /> After Greg's joke on Travis's potato growing abilities last week, Travis brought a bucket full of his potatoes in. They have been all about comparing their onions and potatoes. Travis's Yukon Gold potatoes were some of the biggest ones he has ever grown! Travis explained that he didn't put any fertilizer on his potatoes this year, but it was all about the cover crop cocktail he mixed up. The cocktail consisted of Hairy Vetch, Radishes, and Austrian Winter Peas, that mix fed his soil in just the right way to give him a bountiful harvest.<br /> <br /> Now that he has all these potatoes, they discussed how he was going to store them. If you go back to the video, you can see a shelf design Travis drew up that is perfect for storing and adding other layers too. You want to make sure that you are keeping your onions and potatoes in a cool, dark, and dry space as well as making sure they have plenty of room not to touch. If you have them too stacked on each other, that will cause them to rot.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> If you are not a fan of good eating, you would not have enjoyed the first part of this week's show. Travis and Greg both brought in some great things to taste test, which even led to Travis being blindfolded and spoon-fed!! Greg made Travis try some of his pickled vegetables, including pickled squash. Greg also shouted out one of Mrs.Hoss's favorite Southern Living books and where she had gotten some of these recipes. The book was titled Little Jars Big Flavor. Pickling is a great resort to turn to when you have an abundance of harvest or want to save that taste for later.<br /> <br /> Travis also brought in some of his Max Pack variety of cucumbers and talked about how awesome they were doing and their excellent disease resistance. The guys also announced some new varieties were hitting the website, including Dewlectable Melons, Halo Canary Melons, and Alexandria Squash. <br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> Here at Hoss Tools, we focus a lot on vegetables well our first viewer question was centered around our thoughts towards fruit trees. Travis and Greg listed the many fruit trees they both have at their homesteads, including a Granny Smith Apple tree, lime and lemon trees, a muscadine vine, and many fig trees. Greg then talked about his PlumCot tree, which is a cross between a plum and an apricot that was developed at the UGA research station.<br /> <br /> The next question we had a viewer ask about tips on Kohlrabi, Greg said that this was one of his favorite things to grow. He told her that it does not like the heat and does better in the cooler times of the year, he also said that Kohlrabi goes great in coleslaw as a substitute for cabbage.<br /> <br /> One of the last questions had to do with raised beds/container gardens and what mixture you would use in them. Travis urged not to use only compost because you need something just a little bit denser to hold the water, but instead to fill it about two-thirds of the way with topsoil, then top it off with compost. Then Greg reminded him that if you don't have access to good topsoil, Greg and Travis 48:51 Row By Row Episode 102: Best Maintenance Free Vegetables for your Garden https://hosstools.com/best-maintenance-free-vegetable-garden/ Tue, 19 May 2020 14:40:33 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=111312 Travis's Maintenance Free Picks After a viewer asked the question, "What is the best maintenance free vegetables to grow in your garden?" Travis and Greg both came up with their list of five easiest to grow annual vegetables. As they answered this question, they realized that this is subject to change with every gardener, and that is why even in their two lists, there is deviation. When Travis was answering this question, he considered the following. Pest Pressure Disease Pressure Weed Pressure Harvest Frequency Water Needs Fertilizer Needs After considering all of the above, the number one maintenance-free crop Travis came up with was sweet potatoes. Their lack of need for fertilizers or water is what made him rank this one number one. Another bonus of sweet potatoes is down here in South Georgia. There are very few pests for them. Number two was collards, Travis explained how you get the most bang for your buck with this plant right here. Collards can be harvested six-seven times on one stalk, and each bundle of collards can sell for around five dollars, meaning that you could make almost forty bucks with just one plant. With our weather in South Georgia, you can also get around eight to nine months of growing time. Winter squash was Travis's number three, mainly the Cucurbita Machado species. This species is resistant to the squash vine borer, making it very easy to maintain. The fourth vegetable was okra, though it does have to require multiple harvests, it only has to be watered overhead around once a week. The last one on Travis's list was radish. This one was considered on the list because of its ease when direct seeding it and its very little water need. Greg's Maintenance Free Picks As Greg began to answer this question, he didn't think near as deeply and specific as Travis. He just responded to the question of what causes him the least amount of effort? After twenty-five years of growing this crop, Greg decided this would be his number one maintenance-free pick, Irish potatoes. Potatoes do not need a lot of water because of the time of year they get planted. His next two went hand in hand, summer squash and cucumbers, he explained that these are only maintenance free if you plant them early though. As you plant them early and keep them healthy, they are more likely to fight off diseases. He emphasized that every beginner gardener should be planting these two crops. They also both have a quick turn around with cucumbers only falling ten days behind the squash. Bush beans came in at number four because of their lack of disease and insect pressure. They also get ready to harvest pretty quickly. Now Greg's fifth choice was left up to the viewers to see what they knew about this highly confidential crop known as vine okra. Show and Tell Segment These weeks show and tell segment started with a little snack after lasts week pickled cucumber recipe Travis brought his sliced pickles for Greg to try. This simple recipe calls for flavored olive oil, salt, pepper, and a heavy dose of Cavender's Greek seasoning. Travis then talked about how he is going cucumber crazy! He showed one of his Diomede cucumbers out of his garden that some commercial guys would have considered a cull. They discussed even though the cucumber might look different; it still eats well. That conversation led to Mr.Greg explaining that he is trellising his cucumbers with a hog panel this year and how you have to kind of train your cucumbers up the board compared to the Hortonova Trellis. Two new cucumber varieties were uploaded to the site this week that will be great for our urban gardeners, Mercury and Olympian. One neat thing about Mercury is that it is a parthenocarpic, meaning it only produces female flowers. These varieties will be awesome for our gardeners with no pollinators or a lack of pollinators nearby. Viewer Questions Segment In this week's viewer question segment, our first question asked about last week's epis... Travis's Maintenance Free Picks After a viewer asked the question, "What is the best maintenance free vegetables to grow in your garden?" Travis and Greg both came up with their list of five easiest to grow annual vegetables. Travis's Maintenance Free Picks<br /> After a viewer asked the question, "What is the best maintenance free vegetables to grow in your garden?" Travis and Greg both came up with their list of five easiest to grow annual vegetables. As they answered this question, they realized that this is subject to change with every gardener, and that is why even in their two lists, there is deviation. When Travis was answering this question, he considered the following.<br /> <br /> Pest Pressure<br /> Disease Pressure<br /> Weed Pressure<br /> Harvest Frequency<br /> Water Needs<br /> Fertilizer Needs<br /> <br /> After considering all of the above, the number one maintenance-free crop Travis came up with was sweet potatoes. Their lack of need for fertilizers or water is what made him rank this one number one. Another bonus of sweet potatoes is down here in South Georgia. There are very few pests for them. Number two was collards, Travis explained how you get the most bang for your buck with this plant right here. Collards can be harvested six-seven times on one stalk, and each bundle of collards can sell for around five dollars, meaning that you could make almost forty bucks with just one plant. With our weather in South Georgia, you can also get around eight to nine months of growing time. Winter squash was Travis's number three, mainly the Cucurbita Machado species. This species is resistant to the squash vine borer, making it very easy to maintain. The fourth vegetable was okra, though it does have to require multiple harvests, it only has to be watered overhead around once a week. The last one on Travis's list was radish. This one was considered on the list because of its ease when direct seeding it and its very little water need.<br /> Greg's Maintenance Free Picks<br /> As Greg began to answer this question, he didn't think near as deeply and specific as Travis. He just responded to the question of what causes him the least amount of effort? After twenty-five years of growing this crop, Greg decided this would be his number one maintenance-free pick, Irish potatoes. Potatoes do not need a lot of water because of the time of year they get planted. His next two went hand in hand, summer squash and cucumbers, he explained that these are only maintenance free if you plant them early though. As you plant them early and keep them healthy, they are more likely to fight off diseases. He emphasized that every beginner gardener should be planting these two crops. They also both have a quick turn around with cucumbers only falling ten days behind the squash. Bush beans came in at number four because of their lack of disease and insect pressure. They also get ready to harvest pretty quickly. Now Greg's fifth choice was left up to the viewers to see what they knew about this highly confidential crop known as vine okra.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> These weeks show and tell segment started with a little snack after lasts week pickled cucumber recipe Travis brought his sliced pickles for Greg to try. This simple recipe calls for flavored olive oil, salt, pepper, and a heavy dose of Cavender's Greek seasoning. Travis then talked about how he is going cucumber crazy! He showed one of his Diomede cucumbers out of his garden that some commercial guys would have considered a cull. They discussed even though the cucumber might look different; it still eats well. That conversation led to Mr.Greg explaining that he is trellising his cucumbers with a hog panel this year and how you have to kind of train your cucumbers up the board compared to the Hortonova Trellis. Two new cucumber varieties were uploaded to the site this week that will be great for our urban gardeners, Mercury and Olympian. One neat thing about Mercury is that it is a parthenocarpic, meaning it only produces female flowers. These varieties will be awesome for our gardeners with no pollinators or a lack of pollinators nearby.<br /> Greg and Travis 41:25 Row By Row Episode 101: Till vs. No Till Gardening https://hosstools.com/till-vs-no-till-gardening/ Tue, 19 May 2020 14:38:32 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=110750 Benefits of No Till Gardening No-till gardening can have its advantages and disadvantages, and as Greg put it in this week's episode, it would work out great in a perfect world. Though Greg nor Travis use this Back to Eden style gardening, they discussed the benefits it may have. The first one they discussed was how no-till gardening builds up the earthworm population that could then lead to natural aeration and drainage. The second benefit is that it can save water, the reason behind this is because if you have some mulch covering your garden, you are going to have less evaporation. The third benefit of no-till gardening is that it helps soil retain carbon. Retaining the carbon is an undeniable benefit of no-till gardening because as you cultivate the soil, you can smell the carbon in the atmosphere. Many other bloggers say that no-till gardening also saves time and energy as well as reduces the need to weed. Travis and Greg both disagreed when they compared it to their gardens in which they do. They disagreed because of the fact you have to plant by hand if you don't cultivate your soil, and no-tilling also appears to add weed pressure. Benefits of Tilling a Garden After explaining the benefits of not cultivating your soil Travis and Greg went on to explain the reasons they choose to do so. The first reason was how they saw fewer weeds with tilling, and if they did have weeds, it was easier to get rid of them. The second reason is that it provides oxygen to the soil, cultivating that plot is going to remove that crust and aerate that soil. Another benefit of tilling is that when you are adding compost or manure, it works better if it is integrated within the soil, really getting it mixed within. With tilling, you also don't have to plant everything by hand, but instead, you can go in there with a seeder since you don't have wood chips or another type of mulch over the beds. One last benefit is that with tilling, you can turn-over your beds a lot quicker, and here in South Georgia, this is very important. Down here, we are turning beds over every 30-50 days meaning that to get the most efficient production tilling works best for us. So Which One is Better? Till or No Till Gardening Overall, deciding which method of gardening is all about knowing your climate, the scale of your garden, and the resources you will have at hand. Resources and the size of your garden will differ with every gardener, so there is no right or wrong. We all want to be good stewards of our soil, and if we are growing our food, we are doing just that. Show and Tell Segment Exciting things happened in this week's show and tell segment as we discussed a surprise Greg had show up in his garden for his 55th birthday. Greg then shared one of his favorite Mrs.Hoss recipes for the Calypso Cucumber. The procedure insisted on cutting the cucumbers up long ways, putting them in a zip lock bag, and adding some dill, elephant garlic, and salt. Then let it sit overnight, and they will be delicious come morning. Travis then explained an exciting competition that is taking place now until July 31st between Hoss Tools and some fellow gardening channels that will all be trying to grow the biggest American Giant Sunflower. There may even be some friendly father-son competition. Viewer Questions Segment This week's viewer questions answered a wide array of problems. One focus was on squash plants and if Travis and Greg thought they were better grown through transplants or direct seed. After a great fall winter squash harvest Travis had through transplants, he discussed how he might even do that with his summer squash though they germinate fine with just a seed. Another question centered around squash bugs and how to get rid of them without any chemicals, a tip was shared about using duct tape to remove them manually. One viewer than asked what do they do in regards to weeds, use the "Chop and Drop" method, or do they burn them? Benefits of No Till Gardening No-till gardening can have its advantages and disadvantages, and as Greg put it in this week's episode, it would work out great in a perfect world. Though Greg nor Travis use this Back to Eden style gardening, Benefits of No Till Gardening<br /> No-till gardening can have its advantages and disadvantages, and as Greg put it in this week's episode, it would work out great in a perfect world. Though Greg nor Travis use this Back to Eden style gardening, they discussed the benefits it may have. The first one they discussed was how no-till gardening builds up the earthworm population that could then lead to natural aeration and drainage. The second benefit is that it can save water, the reason behind this is because if you have some mulch covering your garden, you are going to have less evaporation. The third benefit of no-till gardening is that it helps soil retain carbon. Retaining the carbon is an undeniable benefit of no-till gardening because as you cultivate the soil, you can smell the carbon in the atmosphere. Many other bloggers say that no-till gardening also saves time and energy as well as reduces the need to weed. Travis and Greg both disagreed when they compared it to their gardens in which they do. They disagreed because of the fact you have to plant by hand if you don't cultivate your soil, and no-tilling also appears to add weed pressure.<br /> Benefits of Tilling a Garden<br /> After explaining the benefits of not cultivating your soil Travis and Greg went on to explain the reasons they choose to do so. The first reason was how they saw fewer weeds with tilling, and if they did have weeds, it was easier to get rid of them. The second reason is that it provides oxygen to the soil, cultivating that plot is going to remove that crust and aerate that soil. Another benefit of tilling is that when you are adding compost or manure, it works better if it is integrated within the soil, really getting it mixed within. With tilling, you also don't have to plant everything by hand, but instead, you can go in there with a seeder since you don't have wood chips or another type of mulch over the beds. One last benefit is that with tilling, you can turn-over your beds a lot quicker, and here in South Georgia, this is very important. Down here, we are turning beds over every 30-50 days meaning that to get the most efficient production tilling works best for us.<br /> So Which One is Better? Till or No Till Gardening<br /> Overall, deciding which method of gardening is all about knowing your climate, the scale of your garden, and the resources you will have at hand. Resources and the size of your garden will differ with every gardener, so there is no right or wrong. We all want to be good stewards of our soil, and if we are growing our food, we are doing just that.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> Exciting things happened in this week's show and tell segment as we discussed a surprise Greg had show up in his garden for his 55th birthday. Greg then shared one of his favorite Mrs.Hoss recipes for the Calypso Cucumber. The procedure insisted on cutting the cucumbers up long ways, putting them in a zip lock bag, and adding some dill, elephant garlic, and salt. Then let it sit overnight, and they will be delicious come morning. Travis then explained an exciting competition that is taking place now until July 31st between Hoss Tools and some fellow gardening channels that will all be trying to grow the biggest American Giant Sunflower. There may even be some friendly father-son competition.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> This week's viewer questions answered a wide array of problems. One focus was on squash plants and if Travis and Greg thought they were better grown through transplants or direct seed. After a great fall winter squash harvest Travis had through transplants, he discussed how he might even do that with his summer squash though they germinate fine with just a seed. Another question centered around squash bugs and how to get rid of them without any chemicals, a tip was shared about using duct tape to remove them manually. One viewer than asked what do they do in regards to weeds, use the "Chop and Drop" method, Greg and Travis 48:09 Row by Row Episode 100: Best Memories from the Row by Row Garden Show https://hosstools.com/best-memories-row-by-row-garden-show/ Wed, 13 May 2020 15:48:02 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=106871 Row by Row Garden Show To celebrate the 100th episode of the Row by Row Garden Show, Greg and Travis share some of their favorite most memorable moments from the show. Travis mentions that his first moment was when Greg harvested some Honey Select Sweet Corn that tasted terrible however Greg ate the entire bowl of corn. Another moment was when Greg and Travis did their tomato taste test show which is when they tried different tomato varieties and compared them to one another as well. While another memory was when the power all of a sudden went out during the garden show and the guys had to come back the next day to shoot the show. The last favorite memory was during this fall/winter when Greg and Travis had a debate on who grew the biggest and tastiest cabbage in the vegetable garden. Giveaway Questions For the 100th episode of the Row by Row Garden Show, Greg and Travis are giving away a box full of goodies to the three most loyal viewers that can answer all five questions correctly. The first question is how far apart in years and days are Greg and Travis. The second question is what year was Hoss Tools started and Travis gives a little hint that it's an even number. The third question is what is the name of the heirloom winter squash that the guys are growing a seed crop of this year. The fourth question is what is the title of the most viewed Row by Row episode on YouTube. The last and fifth question is what is the name of the book that we carry that has Greg's favorite pickled okra recipes in it. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, the guys celebrate the 100th episode of the Row by Row Garden Show. Greg has the prettiest crop of sweet corn he has ever grown, however, his field corn seems to be struggling right now in the garden. Travis showcases some of his Gold Star Squash which is a crookneck type and some of the Goldprize variety which is a straigtneck type of squash. He also mentions the new patty-pan varieties that are available which are Total Eclipse, Partial Eclipse, and Moonbeam Squash. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about trellising certain crops, growing gourds, finding good quality compost, and when to harvest garlic from the vegetable garden. Although there are several different ways to trellis such as the Florida weave or Hortonova it can vary depending on what crops you are growing. Greg mentions that gourds are really fun to grow in the garden and we have multiple varieties to choose from such as Birdhouse Bottle Gourd, Bule Gourd, etc. Travis suggests the best way to find good quality compost in your area is by simply talking to other gardeners to see what they use in their garden. When it's time to harvest garlic, Greg says the garlic leaves will start to turn yellow or a little bit brown meaning it's time to dig them up. Product of the Week Austrian Crescent Potato https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=koEvpnNNe2U&t=20s Row by Row Garden Show To celebrate the 100th episode of the Row by Row Garden Show, Greg and Travis share some of their favorite most memorable moments from the show. Travis mentions that his first moment was when Greg harvested some Honey Select Swe... Row by Row Garden Show<br /> To celebrate the 100th episode of the Row by Row Garden Show, Greg and Travis share some of their favorite most memorable moments from the show. Travis mentions that his first moment was when Greg harvested some Honey Select Sweet Corn that tasted terrible however Greg ate the entire bowl of corn. Another moment was when Greg and Travis did their tomato taste test show which is when they tried different tomato varieties and compared them to one another as well. While another memory was when the power all of a sudden went out during the garden show and the guys had to come back the next day to shoot the show. The last favorite memory was during this fall/winter when Greg and Travis had a debate on who grew the biggest and tastiest cabbage in the vegetable garden.<br /> Giveaway Questions<br /> For the 100th episode of the Row by Row Garden Show, Greg and Travis are giving away a box full of goodies to the three most loyal viewers that can answer all five questions correctly. The first question is how far apart in years and days are Greg and Travis. The second question is what year was Hoss Tools started and Travis gives a little hint that it's an even number. The third question is what is the name of the heirloom winter squash that the guys are growing a seed crop of this year. The fourth question is what is the title of the most viewed Row by Row episode on YouTube. The last and fifth question is what is the name of the book that we carry that has Greg's favorite pickled okra recipes in it.<br /> <br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> <br /> On the show and tell segment, the guys celebrate the 100th episode of the Row by Row Garden Show. Greg has the prettiest crop of sweet corn he has ever grown, however, his field corn seems to be struggling right now in the garden. Travis showcases some of his Gold Star Squash which is a crookneck type and some of the Goldprize variety which is a straigtneck type of squash. He also mentions the new patty-pan varieties that are available which are Total Eclipse, Partial Eclipse, and Moonbeam Squash.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about trellising certain crops, growing gourds, finding good quality compost, and when to harvest garlic from the vegetable garden. Although there are several different ways to trellis such as the Florida weave or Hortonova it can vary depending on what crops you are growing. Greg mentions that gourds are really fun to grow in the garden and we have multiple varieties to choose from such as Birdhouse Bottle Gourd, Bule Gourd, etc. Travis suggests the best way to find good quality compost in your area is by simply talking to other gardeners to see what they use in their garden. When it's time to harvest garlic, Greg says the garlic leaves will start to turn yellow or a little bit brown meaning it's time to dig them up.<br /> Product of the Week<br /> <br /> Austrian Crescent Potato<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=koEvpnNNe2U&t=20s Greg and Travis 57:38 Row by Row Episode 99: Best Fertilizers to Use on Vegetable Crops https://hosstools.com/best-fertilizers-vegetable-crops/ Sat, 25 Apr 2020 15:48:37 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=103609 Determining the Best Fertilizers for Your Garden When discussing what the best fertilizers are to use on certain crops and how much to use on plants there are so many variables that can play into this decision. Depending on what type of soils you have in your own garden can help indicate what type of fertilizer is the best for you to use on vegetable plants. For example, if you have sandy type soil and somebody else has clay-like soils the recommend fertilization program is gonna change drastically because of the different nutrient requirements in those different soil types. Best Fertilizers to Use on Certain Crops The first type of fertilizer that they discuss is the organic fertilizers that you can put down at pre-plant in the garden. The first one is our Complete Orangic Fertilizer which is pelleted hen manure that can be added at pre-plant and then four weeks after in the garden area because it is more of a slower release process. The recommended rate on this is one and a half cup per square feet, for example, could be about five-row feet depending on what you have planted. The next fertilizer that is suggested is the Liqui-Fish which can be used to feed the soil by either soil drench or injecting it through a sprinkler system. However, this fertilizer works better in warm weather than it does it cool weather. The third fertilizer discussed is the 20-20-20 Garden Fertilizer which is used on almost everything grown in the vegetable garden. If you prefer to hand water you should put about one to two cups in a five-gallon bucket and then pour it alongside your plants. Travis has a 64-ounce mixing cup that is basically a half-gallon that he will fill up 3/4 of the way with the 20-20-20 and then take a cup or two of Micro Boost on top and that's what he puts in his injector every time he runs it. The 20-20-20 is ideal for spoon feeding which means just giving the plants a little bit at a time with the injector. Another great fertilizer is the Calcium Nitrate which works well on all your nightshades such as tomatoes, peppers, and eggplants. There two grades to this nitrate which are soluble and non-soluble which means it can either be water-soluble or not. The only one we carry is the water-soluble Calcium Nitrate which works great in the injector as well. The rate on this fertilizer is a pound per hundred-row feet or if you are injecting on a big plot put out five pounds per thousand square feet. When it comes to organic calcium like Gypsum Soil Conditioner it is great for helping in clay-like soils that need a quality soil conditioner in the area. Then, we have Chilean Nitrate which is a go-to fertilizer for corn that adds a natural source of nitrogen into the vegetable garden. The rate on the Chilean Nitrate for side dressing corn is a whole 10-pound bag per thousand square feet. Next, is our go-to Allium fertilizer known as Ammonium Sulfate which is used on plants like onions, garlic, leeks, or shallots. This fertilizer has a recommended rate when side-dressed of one cup per 20 feet row and when injecting it's one cup per 40 feet. Lastly, one of our most popular fertilizers is the Micro Boost which is a blend that is specifically designed to improve the yield in your vegetable garden. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, the guys compare their SunBurst Squash varieties to see just how well they grew in the vegetable garden. Travis mentions that we have several new colors of the patty-pan type squash such as MoonBeam, Total Eclipse, Partial Eclipse, and Bennings Green Tint. Greg shows off some purple asparagus that he harvested from the garden. Since a lot of customers have been wanting some half runner beans, we finally got some Mountaineer Half Runner Beans which is an old heirloom that is supposed to be the best variety out there. The guys also discuss the difference between crowder and pink-eyed pea types. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment this week, Determining the Best Fertilizers for Your Garden When discussing what the best fertilizers are to use on certain crops and how much to use on plants there are so many variables that can play into this decision. Determining the Best Fertilizers for Your Garden<br /> When discussing what the best fertilizers are to use on certain crops and how much to use on plants there are so many variables that can play into this decision. Depending on what type of soils you have in your own garden can help indicate what type of fertilizer is the best for you to use on vegetable plants. For example, if you have sandy type soil and somebody else has clay-like soils the recommend fertilization program is gonna change drastically because of the different nutrient requirements in those different soil types.<br /> Best Fertilizers to Use on Certain Crops<br /> The first type of fertilizer that they discuss is the organic fertilizers that you can put down at pre-plant in the garden. The first one is our Complete Orangic Fertilizer which is pelleted hen manure that can be added at pre-plant and then four weeks after in the garden area because it is more of a slower release process. The recommended rate on this is one and a half cup per square feet, for example, could be about five-row feet depending on what you have planted. The next fertilizer that is suggested is the Liqui-Fish which can be used to feed the soil by either soil drench or injecting it through a sprinkler system. However, this fertilizer works better in warm weather than it does it cool weather. The third fertilizer discussed is the 20-20-20 Garden Fertilizer which is used on almost everything grown in the vegetable garden. If you prefer to hand water you should put about one to two cups in a five-gallon bucket and then pour it alongside your plants. Travis has a 64-ounce mixing cup that is basically a half-gallon that he will fill up 3/4 of the way with the 20-20-20 and then take a cup or two of Micro Boost on top and that's what he puts in his injector every time he runs it. The 20-20-20 is ideal for spoon feeding which means just giving the plants a little bit at a time with the injector. Another great fertilizer is the Calcium Nitrate which works well on all your nightshades such as tomatoes, peppers, and eggplants. There two grades to this nitrate which are soluble and non-soluble which means it can either be water-soluble or not. The only one we carry is the water-soluble Calcium Nitrate which works great in the injector as well. The rate on this fertilizer is a pound per hundred-row feet or if you are injecting on a big plot put out five pounds per thousand square feet. When it comes to organic calcium like Gypsum Soil Conditioner it is great for helping in clay-like soils that need a quality soil conditioner in the area. Then, we have Chilean Nitrate which is a go-to fertilizer for corn that adds a natural source of nitrogen into the vegetable garden. The rate on the Chilean Nitrate for side dressing corn is a whole 10-pound bag per thousand square feet. Next, is our go-to Allium fertilizer known as Ammonium Sulfate which is used on plants like onions, garlic, leeks, or shallots. This fertilizer has a recommended rate when side-dressed of one cup per 20 feet row and when injecting it's one cup per 40 feet. Lastly, one of our most popular fertilizers is the Micro Boost which is a blend that is specifically designed to improve the yield in your vegetable garden.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, the guys compare their SunBurst Squash varieties to see just how well they grew in the vegetable garden. Travis mentions that we have several new colors of the patty-pan type squash such as MoonBeam, Total Eclipse, Partial Eclipse, and Bennings Green Tint. Greg shows off some purple asparagus that he harvested from the garden. Since a lot of customers have been wanting some half runner beans, we finally got some Mountaineer Half Runner Beans which is an old heirloom that is supposed to be the best variety out there. The guys also discuss the difference between crowder and pink-eyed pea types.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> Greg and Travis 52:24 Row by Row Episode 98: Best Layout for a Small Beginner Gardener https://hosstools.com/best-layout-small-beginner-gardener/ Tue, 21 Apr 2020 16:27:16 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=100452 Small Beginner Gardener If you are a small beginner gardener that only has room for a 20x20 vegetable garden, what can you plant in that area? Although that seems like a simple question to answer there is actually a couple of different factors that play into that like weather temperatures, soil types, certain crop nutrients, etc. Small Beginner Gardener with 20x20 Area The 20x20 small beginner gardener diagram that we discuss is subject to change depending on what vegetables you like to eat or plant in the garden. However, this plan is designed to get the most out of the area you have and we suggest planting thick and incorporating some vertical gardening to achieve maximum space. In the 20x20 garden area, Travis sectioned it into 4 foot wide quadrants for row spacing. Along the first row in the diagram, we suggest pole beans because they can be grown vertically on a trellis and easy to maintain along the edge of the garden in that beginning row. If you are planting one row of pole beans we recommend planting Kentucky Blue which is extremely productive and has sweeter flavor profiles than traditional pole beans. On the second row, is where we can plant some nightshades such as tomatoes, peppers, and eggplants. Within a 20-foot row, you can get about 10 plants in the area that are 2-feet apart. Therefore, you can plant five tomato plants of the Brickyard variety, three pepper plants like a Bell Pepper or Cubanelle, and two eggplants of the highly productive Purple Shine variety. Next, along the third row a great crop to grow is Jambalaya Okra. However, if you do not like picking okra every other day the jambalaya variety may not be for you because it is best picked at around three to four inches long. If you prefer to pick okra every three to five days choose a variety like the Perkins Long Pod, Cowhorn, or Red Burgundy to plant in the garden. Then, on the fourth row, you can plant some squash and zucchini along that garden row. Although there's several good varieties if you just had to pick two to grow we would recommend Goldprize Squash and Pascola Zucchini. On the last row, we suggest planting cucumbers specifically the Stonewall variety, but that can vary depending on if you prefer pickling or slicing cucumbers. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, the guys discuss a little information about the Row by Row Garden Show and little insight into what gardening all involves if you are new to the gardening world. Travis has some mulberries that were harvested this year from his mulberry trees. After a heavy storm this past weekend, the guys talk about the importance of getting in the garden as soon as that rain is over to cultivate the area and let that soil breathe. The new South Anna Butternut Squash is a hybrid that grows excellent in the heat and is disease resistant. The guys also compare their different sized onions and how they grow onions in the vegetable garden. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about controlling thick crabgrass, dependable tomato variety, removing bermudagrass, and hilling potatoes in a raised bed. Travis mentions the best way to remove crabgrass is to control it when it is small and remove the whole thing. You can also plant a cover crop like Sorghum Sudangrass or Sunn Hemp to help block or cover the soil from sunlight, therefore, you are able to break up that crabgrass seed from germinating. When discussing the three most reliable tomato varieties out of the cherry, salsa, and sandwich-type tomatoes which one is the best to plant. Greg says for the cherry type tomato he recommends the Yellow Pear which produces smaller yellow fruits that have a tangy, almost citrus flavor profile. For the salsa type tomato, the Amish Paste is the best type which is an excellent open-pollinated variety as well. While the best sandwich-type tomato is the Bella Rosa which is one of our popular tomato varieties. Small Beginner Gardener If you are a small beginner gardener that only has room for a 20x20 vegetable garden, what can you plant in that area? Although that seems like a simple question to answer there is actually a couple of different factors that pl... Small Beginner Gardener<br /> If you are a small beginner gardener that only has room for a 20x20 vegetable garden, what can you plant in that area? Although that seems like a simple question to answer there is actually a couple of different factors that play into that like weather temperatures, soil types, certain crop nutrients, etc.<br /> Small Beginner Gardener with 20x20 Area<br /> The 20x20 small beginner gardener diagram that we discuss is subject to change depending on what vegetables you like to eat or plant in the garden. However, this plan is designed to get the most out of the area you have and we suggest planting thick and incorporating some vertical gardening to achieve maximum space. In the 20x20 garden area, Travis sectioned it into 4 foot wide quadrants for row spacing. Along the first row in the diagram, we suggest pole beans because they can be grown vertically on a trellis and easy to maintain along the edge of the garden in that beginning row. If you are planting one row of pole beans we recommend planting Kentucky Blue which is extremely productive and has sweeter flavor profiles than traditional pole beans. On the second row, is where we can plant some nightshades such as tomatoes, peppers, and eggplants. Within a 20-foot row, you can get about 10 plants in the area that are 2-feet apart. Therefore, you can plant five tomato plants of the Brickyard variety, three pepper plants like a Bell Pepper or Cubanelle, and two eggplants of the highly productive Purple Shine variety. Next, along the third row a great crop to grow is Jambalaya Okra. However, if you do not like picking okra every other day the jambalaya variety may not be for you because it is best picked at around three to four inches long. If you prefer to pick okra every three to five days choose a variety like the Perkins Long Pod, Cowhorn, or Red Burgundy to plant in the garden. Then, on the fourth row, you can plant some squash and zucchini along that garden row. Although there's several good varieties if you just had to pick two to grow we would recommend Goldprize Squash and Pascola Zucchini. On the last row, we suggest planting cucumbers specifically the Stonewall variety, but that can vary depending on if you prefer pickling or slicing cucumbers.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, the guys discuss a little information about the Row by Row Garden Show and little insight into what gardening all involves if you are new to the gardening world. Travis has some mulberries that were harvested this year from his mulberry trees. After a heavy storm this past weekend, the guys talk about the importance of getting in the garden as soon as that rain is over to cultivate the area and let that soil breathe. The new South Anna Butternut Squash is a hybrid that grows excellent in the heat and is disease resistant. The guys also compare their different sized onions and how they grow onions in the vegetable garden.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about controlling thick crabgrass, dependable tomato variety, removing bermudagrass, and hilling potatoes in a raised bed. Travis mentions the best way to remove crabgrass is to control it when it is small and remove the whole thing. You can also plant a cover crop like Sorghum Sudangrass or Sunn Hemp to help block or cover the soil from sunlight, therefore, you are able to break up that crabgrass seed from germinating. When discussing the three most reliable tomato varieties out of the cherry, salsa, and sandwich-type tomatoes which one is the best to plant. Greg says for the cherry type tomato he recommends the Yellow Pear which produces smaller yellow fruits that have a tangy, almost citrus flavor profile. For the salsa type tomato, the Amish Paste is the best type which is an excellent open-pollinated variety as well. While the best sandwich-type tomato is the Bella Rosa which is one of our popular... Greg and Travis 41:53 Row by Row Episode 97: Advantages vs. Disadvantages with Different Wheel Hoe Attachments https://hosstools.com/advantages-disadvantages-wheel-hoe-attachments/ Tue, 14 Apr 2020 21:31:54 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=92392 Variety of Wheel Hoe Attachments Our popular Single, Double, and High Arch Wheel Hoes are known to make gardening easier and with our variety of wheel hoe attachments, it makes working in the garden more manageable than ever. All three wheel hoes come with a set of cultivator teeths which is used for breaking up the soil to do preventative weeding in the garden. You can use up to five cultivator teeth on the wheel hoe, however, we have found that using less is better because if there are too many it tends to clog up. The most popular wheel hoe attachments that we have are the plows that have a left and right plow. To use the plows in the hilling position, you must put the right plow on the left and the left plow on the right to ensure they hill vegetables correctly. The second wheel hoe attachment that makes it easier to garden is the oscillating hoe which is available in a 6, 8, and 12-inch. If you have harder garden soils to work in this attachment is one of our strongest weeding attachments to use for managing the vegetable garden. Another great wheel hoe attachment is the sweeps which have a few limitations. The sweep blades are zinc-coated and made to overlap one another so you can control the size of the desired weeding path. Depending on your soil type and the amount of weed pressure you experience you should go with the sweeps if you've got softer soils and tend to stay on top of weed pressure a little more. However, go with the oscillating hoe iff you've got heavier soils and lots of weed pressure in the garden. Another advantage of using the sweeps is you can get super close cultivation next to plants that are in the ground. The fourth wheel hoe attachment is the winged sweeps which are similar to the sweeps but have a little bit different shape. The ideal setup for the wheel hoe is to have two or three-winged sweeps to ensure they work properly. Next, is one of the most misunderstood implements that we carry which is the disk harrow. This disk harrow is made for seedbed preparation, incorporating compost in the soil, and close cultivation when moved in a different position. The last attachment that the guys mention is the spreader bar which is more of an accessory that is used to extend the wheel hoe toolbar for adding more attachments. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, the guys discussed watermelons on last week's show and forgot to explain the watermelon fertilization program. Greg mentions that watermelons are a long-term crop that takes around 80 to 90 days, therefore, you need to split up fertilization as much as you can and not apply them all at one time. The ideal amount is no more than 120 units per acre of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium. It's best if you spoon feed it and bust it up while using a well-balanced fertilizer like 20-20-20 and alternate with calcium nitrate. Watermelons also need zinc, boron, and magnesium that is available in Micro-Boost. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about spraying leaves and heat-tolerant lettuces. Travis mentions when spraying anything on the garden it's important to have a nice nozzle or sprayer that will atomize what you are spraying so you don't spray too much and have it running off the leaves. When growing lettuce the Cherokee and Tehama have been proven to be the most heat-tolerant varieties that we carry on the site. Product of the Week Pickle Packer Jar Tamper https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tEYxqhlO9ks Variety of Wheel Hoe Attachments Our popular Single, Double, and High Arch Wheel Hoes are known to make gardening easier and with our variety of wheel hoe attachments, it makes working in the garden more manageable than ever. Variety of Wheel Hoe Attachments<br /> Our popular Single, Double, and High Arch Wheel Hoes are known to make gardening easier and with our variety of wheel hoe attachments, it makes working in the garden more manageable than ever. All three wheel hoes come with a set of cultivator teeths which is used for breaking up the soil to do preventative weeding in the garden. You can use up to five cultivator teeth on the wheel hoe, however, we have found that using less is better because if there are too many it tends to clog up. The most popular wheel hoe attachments that we have are the plows that have a left and right plow. To use the plows in the hilling position, you must put the right plow on the left and the left plow on the right to ensure they hill vegetables correctly. The second wheel hoe attachment that makes it easier to garden is the oscillating hoe which is available in a 6, 8, and 12-inch. If you have harder garden soils to work in this attachment is one of our strongest weeding attachments to use for managing the vegetable garden. Another great wheel hoe attachment is the sweeps which have a few limitations. The sweep blades are zinc-coated and made to overlap one another so you can control the size of the desired weeding path. Depending on your soil type and the amount of weed pressure you experience you should go with the sweeps if you've got softer soils and tend to stay on top of weed pressure a little more. However, go with the oscillating hoe iff you've got heavier soils and lots of weed pressure in the garden. Another advantage of using the sweeps is you can get super close cultivation next to plants that are in the ground. The fourth wheel hoe attachment is the winged sweeps which are similar to the sweeps but have a little bit different shape. The ideal setup for the wheel hoe is to have two or three-winged sweeps to ensure they work properly. Next, is one of the most misunderstood implements that we carry which is the disk harrow. This disk harrow is made for seedbed preparation, incorporating compost in the soil, and close cultivation when moved in a different position. The last attachment that the guys mention is the spreader bar which is more of an accessory that is used to extend the wheel hoe toolbar for adding more attachments.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, the guys discussed watermelons on last week's show and forgot to explain the watermelon fertilization program. Greg mentions that watermelons are a long-term crop that takes around 80 to 90 days, therefore, you need to split up fertilization as much as you can and not apply them all at one time. The ideal amount is no more than 120 units per acre of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium. It's best if you spoon feed it and bust it up while using a well-balanced fertilizer like 20-20-20 and alternate with calcium nitrate. Watermelons also need zinc, boron, and magnesium that is available in Micro-Boost.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about spraying leaves and heat-tolerant lettuces. Travis mentions when spraying anything on the garden it's important to have a nice nozzle or sprayer that will atomize what you are spraying so you don't spray too much and have it running off the leaves. When growing lettuce the Cherokee and Tehama have been proven to be the most heat-tolerant varieties that we carry on the site.<br /> Product of the Week<br /> <br /> Pickle Packer Jar Tamper<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tEYxqhlO9ks Greg and Travis 41:15 Row by Row Episode 96: Tips for Growing Watermelons from an Expert Grower! https://hosstools.com/tips-growing-watermelons-expert-grower/ Mon, 06 Apr 2020 15:13:47 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=83718 Watermelon Varieties Since Hoss Tools has started selling seeds, Greg has decided to try a new variety of watermelons every year. In the past, he prefers growing watermelons such as Crimson Sweet before he started trying new watermelon varieties. Last year, he grew the Moon and Stars variety and this year he has decided to plant the Sangria Watermelon. When discussing the heirloom or open-pollinated watermelon varieties the few that we have available include Charleston Gray which is a more elongated, smaller sized watermelon that contained a thick rind and a very popular variety back in the day. The Moon and Stars variety consist of oblong fruits that average around 25 lbs but can get as large as 40 lbs. Another popular variety is the Sugar Baby which is a smaller sized watermelon that averages 10 to 12 lbs. Then, the last two heirloom varieties we have available are the Tendersweet Orange and Crimson Sweet which is great tasting watermelons as well. A hybrid variety is the Baby Doll which has a bright yellow interior that has an exceptional flavor profile. While the all sweet type watermelon varieties include Dulce Fantasia, Sangria, and Jamboree. Tips for Planting Watermelons When it comes to growing watermelons you can direct seed or transplant in a seed starting tray. Another factor of growing watermelons is they require drip irrigation to ensure you supply enough water directly to plant roots and control fungal diseases. It's also very important to have pollinators to get higher production yield. For plant spacing, Greg recommends a foot or two with row spacing around five feet in the vegetable garden. All the fertilization should be done before fruits start to set in the area. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, the guys try out the first batch of sauerkraut that Travis made using his cabbages harvested from the vegetable garden. Greg discusses the ideal time to plant potatoes so you don't experience rotten potatoes in the next growing season. The guys also touch base on some products that are being restocked in the next couple of days. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about sowing onion seeds, storing seeds, spinosad effect on bees, healing potatoes, mixing B.T. and Spinosad, and treatment for aphids. Travis mentions last fall he started sowing onion seeds as early as last August and early September all the way through October. In sowing onion seeds this way he found that he can succession plant onions in the vegetable garden. Greg recommends storing seeds anywhere where you can get a constant temperature or environment such as a refrigerator. When spraying spinosad you should either do it right before dark or after dark when the bees are not in the garden pollinating. When it comes to mixing B.t. and Spinosad, Travis mentions they pretty much do the same thing so either use or other in the garden. Greg suggests using either Neem Oil or Pyrthine to control aphids and keep after them regularly to maintain a decrease in the population. Product of the Week Complete Organic Fertilizer https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1wPyMMuUyl0 Watermelon Varieties Since Hoss Tools has started selling seeds, Greg has decided to try a new variety of watermelons every year. In the past, he prefers growing watermelons such as Crimson Sweet before he started trying new watermelon varieties. Watermelon Varieties<br /> Since Hoss Tools has started selling seeds, Greg has decided to try a new variety of watermelons every year. In the past, he prefers growing watermelons such as Crimson Sweet before he started trying new watermelon varieties. Last year, he grew the Moon and Stars variety and this year he has decided to plant the Sangria Watermelon. When discussing the heirloom or open-pollinated watermelon varieties the few that we have available include Charleston Gray which is a more elongated, smaller sized watermelon that contained a thick rind and a very popular variety back in the day. The Moon and Stars variety consist of oblong fruits that average around 25 lbs but can get as large as 40 lbs. Another popular variety is the Sugar Baby which is a smaller sized watermelon that averages 10 to 12 lbs. Then, the last two heirloom varieties we have available are the Tendersweet Orange and Crimson Sweet which is great tasting watermelons as well. A hybrid variety is the Baby Doll which has a bright yellow interior that has an exceptional flavor profile. While the all sweet type watermelon varieties include Dulce Fantasia, Sangria, and Jamboree.<br /> Tips for Planting Watermelons<br /> When it comes to growing watermelons you can direct seed or transplant in a seed starting tray. Another factor of growing watermelons is they require drip irrigation to ensure you supply enough water directly to plant roots and control fungal diseases. It's also very important to have pollinators to get higher production yield. For plant spacing, Greg recommends a foot or two with row spacing around five feet in the vegetable garden. All the fertilization should be done before fruits start to set in the area.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, the guys try out the first batch of sauerkraut that Travis made using his cabbages harvested from the vegetable garden. Greg discusses the ideal time to plant potatoes so you don't experience rotten potatoes in the next growing season. The guys also touch base on some products that are being restocked in the next couple of days.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about sowing onion seeds, storing seeds, spinosad effect on bees, healing potatoes, mixing B.T. and Spinosad, and treatment for aphids. Travis mentions last fall he started sowing onion seeds as early as last August and early September all the way through October. In sowing onion seeds this way he found that he can succession plant onions in the vegetable garden. Greg recommends storing seeds anywhere where you can get a constant temperature or environment such as a refrigerator. When spraying spinosad you should either do it right before dark or after dark when the bees are not in the garden pollinating. When it comes to mixing B.t. and Spinosad, Travis mentions they pretty much do the same thing so either use or other in the garden. Greg suggests using either Neem Oil or Pyrthine to control aphids and keep after them regularly to maintain a decrease in the population.<br /> Product of the Week<br /> <br /> Complete Organic Fertilizer<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1wPyMMuUyl0 Greg and Travis 47:53 Row by Row Episode 95: Most Tasty Sweet Corn Variety for the Garden https://hosstools.com/most-tasty-sweet-corn-variety-garden/ Thu, 02 Apr 2020 17:09:54 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=80390 Types/Tasty Sweet Corn Varieties The three major types/tasty sweet corn are known as standard, sugary extender, and supersweet. The standard is a su gene that is mostly your old-time favorite varieties including Silver Queen, Stowell's Evergreen, and Jubilee. The standard type will germinate in cooler soils better than the supersweet and once they are harvested you have to do something with them quickly because they normally last about 3 days in the fridge. While the sugary extender or sugary enhance type is where you will find the majority of the most popular varieties such as Silver King, Bodacious, Incredible, Peaches & Cream, Ambrosia, and Argent Sweet Corn. Typically the sugary enhance gene can store a little better than the standard type and needs a little warmer soil temperatures to germinate. Lastly, the supersweet type is known for storing the longest once harvested and requires even warmer soil temperatures to germinate in the garden. Also, the supersweets require a little more maintenance than the standard or sugary enhanced type. Now an uncommon type is known as triplesweet corn which actually contains all three of the major genes such as the standard, sugary enhance, and supersweet. One thing about having the triplesweet contain all three of the major genes is that you don't have to isolate when planting. Therefore, if you want to grow two different varieties of sweet corn you should plant whichever variety of the standard, sugary enhanced, or supersweet then wait two weeks and plant you a triplesweet in the vegetable garden. Planting/Growing Tips The main factor about planting sweet corn is it should be planted in blocks, not rows. Corn is pollinated by the wind so if you experience corn cobs that are half-filled at the end of the growing season it is most likely due to pollination issues. Therefore, planting in squares that are larger and blockier the better your pollination will be throughout the growing season. Another important factor about pollination is ensuring that your fertilizer is delivered right to your corn to help with the coincide of the tassel and silk development. When it comes to spacing, corn has a standard row spacing of 36 inches. Travis has tried growing corn with two-foot spacing but was not successful because there is too much foliage and your pollen can't fall to the silks. For seed spacing along the row, it can vary a little bit depending on what irrigation you have, however, the most ideal is 6 to 8 inches apart. When dealing with fungus and disease on corn we suggest using Liquid Copper Fungicide, Complete Disease Control, or Spinosad. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Greg and Travis discuss a little bit about the pandemic that is happening right now. Travis has some Pak Choi that he has harvested from the garden. This variety of cabbage is a fast producing crop that creates steady production and excellent flavor profiles. Next, he has a variety of Gold Nugget Carrots that were grown in the garden for the first time this year and they are similar to the Bugs Bunny type carrots. The guys also compare their onion varieties that were harvested from the garden area. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about when to plant tomatoes and planting watermelons. Travis mentions that he just has a feeling when it's time to plant tomatoes in the garden. He kinda knows when the frost is done and the temperatures start warming up it's time to plant. Greg says he still has to get drip tape in the ground, but it is time once the true leaves start coming up in the greenhouse. Product of the Week Sweet Corn Varieties https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=buuPR6ds_CM Types/Tasty Sweet Corn Varieties The three major types/tasty sweet corn are known as standard, sugary extender, and supersweet. The standard is a su gene that is mostly your old-time favorite varieties including Silver Queen, Stowell's Evergreen, Types/Tasty Sweet Corn Varieties<br /> The three major types/tasty sweet corn are known as standard, sugary extender, and supersweet. The standard is a su gene that is mostly your old-time favorite varieties including Silver Queen, Stowell's Evergreen, and Jubilee. The standard type will germinate in cooler soils better than the supersweet and once they are harvested you have to do something with them quickly because they normally last about 3 days in the fridge. While the sugary extender or sugary enhance type is where you will find the majority of the most popular varieties such as Silver King, Bodacious, Incredible, Peaches & Cream, Ambrosia, and Argent Sweet Corn. Typically the sugary enhance gene can store a little better than the standard type and needs a little warmer soil temperatures to germinate. Lastly, the supersweet type is known for storing the longest once harvested and requires even warmer soil temperatures to germinate in the garden. Also, the supersweets require a little more maintenance than the standard or sugary enhanced type. Now an uncommon type is known as triplesweet corn which actually contains all three of the major genes such as the standard, sugary enhance, and supersweet. One thing about having the triplesweet contain all three of the major genes is that you don't have to isolate when planting. Therefore, if you want to grow two different varieties of sweet corn you should plant whichever variety of the standard, sugary enhanced, or supersweet then wait two weeks and plant you a triplesweet in the vegetable garden.<br /> Planting/Growing Tips<br /> The main factor about planting sweet corn is it should be planted in blocks, not rows. Corn is pollinated by the wind so if you experience corn cobs that are half-filled at the end of the growing season it is most likely due to pollination issues. Therefore, planting in squares that are larger and blockier the better your pollination will be throughout the growing season. Another important factor about pollination is ensuring that your fertilizer is delivered right to your corn to help with the coincide of the tassel and silk development. When it comes to spacing, corn has a standard row spacing of 36 inches. Travis has tried growing corn with two-foot spacing but was not successful because there is too much foliage and your pollen can't fall to the silks. For seed spacing along the row, it can vary a little bit depending on what irrigation you have, however, the most ideal is 6 to 8 inches apart. When dealing with fungus and disease on corn we suggest using Liquid Copper Fungicide, Complete Disease Control, or Spinosad.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Greg and Travis discuss a little bit about the pandemic that is happening right now. Travis has some Pak Choi that he has harvested from the garden. This variety of cabbage is a fast producing crop that creates steady production and excellent flavor profiles. Next, he has a variety of Gold Nugget Carrots that were grown in the garden for the first time this year and they are similar to the Bugs Bunny type carrots. The guys also compare their onion varieties that were harvested from the garden area.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about when to plant tomatoes and planting watermelons. Travis mentions that he just has a feeling when it's time to plant tomatoes in the garden. He kinda knows when the frost is done and the temperatures start warming up it's time to plant. Greg says he still has to get drip tape in the ground, but it is time once the true leaves start coming up in the greenhouse.<br /> Product of the Week<br /> <br /> Sweet Corn Varieties<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=buuPR6ds_CM Greg and Travis 49:38 Row by Row Episode 94: Cross Pollinating to Save Seeds for Future Growing Seasons https://hosstools.com/cross-pollinating-save-seeds-future-growing-seasons/ Tue, 31 Mar 2020 13:43:35 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=78040 Tips for Cross-Pollinating When it comes to saving seeds the most important factor in keeping that seed pure to its genetics is ensuring you aren't cross-pollinating with other varieties in the vegetable garden. Different Types of Pollination The three main pollinating types of crops are self-pollinating, wind pollinating, and insect pollinating. The self-pollinating crops include beans, peas, okra, tomatoes, peppers, and eggplant which do not require beneficial insects to pollinate them. To ensure you do not experience cross-pollinating of the self-pollinating crops there are isolation distances to help with keeping the seeds you are wanting to save true or pure for future growing seasons. The isolation distances recommended for beans or peas is 20 feet, okra is 1500 feet, tomatoes is 10 feet, peppers is 100 feet, and eggplant is 50 feet between varieties in the area. When it comes to wind-pollinating, corn is the only crop that is wind-pollinated. When growing corn you have a male flower which is the tassel and the female flower which is the silk. Wind-pollination allows the pollen grains on the tassel to fertilize the silk and every little silk represents a kernel on the ear of corn. Another important type of pollination is our insect-pollination where we need bees to help us make fruits during the growing season. The insect-pollinated crops include cantaloupes, watermelons, cucumbers, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, and gourds. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Travis has a handful of Viper Carrots that he recently harvested from the vegetable garden. Greg grew the Yellowstone variety that was rather small and more personal-sized carrots. The guys also discuss their composting technique for different plots and vegetables this growing season. According to Greg, it may be the year for planting potatoes, however, Travis is a little worried that the weather temperatures have struck hot quick for potato growing. Travis shows off a seed starting tray full of tomato transplants that are ready to be planting in the garden. The several different tomato varieties he plans on planting are Bella Rosa, Celebration, Brickyard, Red Snapper, Chef's Choice Orange, Homestead, and Black Krim. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about planting sweet potato slips, using cotton gin trash compost, and squash succession planting. Travis likes to wait and plant sweet potato slips in June or sometimes even July that way he can dig them towards November. Although there as been concern about using gin trash compost, Travis and Greg are getting their compost from a gin trash company that is taking the right measurements to ensure they are creating quality grade compost that can be used in the garden area. Greg mentions when succession planting summer squash he always direct seeds and moves them over a row or two so he doesn't plant in the same exact row. Product of the Week AAS Winners https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LX8z_-1_V7A Tips for Cross-Pollinating When it comes to saving seeds the most important factor in keeping that seed pure to its genetics is ensuring you aren't cross-pollinating with other varieties in the vegetable garden. Different Types of Pollination Tips for Cross-Pollinating<br /> When it comes to saving seeds the most important factor in keeping that seed pure to its genetics is ensuring you aren't cross-pollinating with other varieties in the vegetable garden.<br /> Different Types of Pollination<br /> The three main pollinating types of crops are self-pollinating, wind pollinating, and insect pollinating. The self-pollinating crops include beans, peas, okra, tomatoes, peppers, and eggplant which do not require beneficial insects to pollinate them. To ensure you do not experience cross-pollinating of the self-pollinating crops there are isolation distances to help with keeping the seeds you are wanting to save true or pure for future growing seasons. The isolation distances recommended for beans or peas is 20 feet, okra is 1500 feet, tomatoes is 10 feet, peppers is 100 feet, and eggplant is 50 feet between varieties in the area. When it comes to wind-pollinating, corn is the only crop that is wind-pollinated. When growing corn you have a male flower which is the tassel and the female flower which is the silk. Wind-pollination allows the pollen grains on the tassel to fertilize the silk and every little silk represents a kernel on the ear of corn. Another important type of pollination is our insect-pollination where we need bees to help us make fruits during the growing season. The insect-pollinated crops include cantaloupes, watermelons, cucumbers, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, and gourds.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Travis has a handful of Viper Carrots that he recently harvested from the vegetable garden. Greg grew the Yellowstone variety that was rather small and more personal-sized carrots. The guys also discuss their composting technique for different plots and vegetables this growing season. According to Greg, it may be the year for planting potatoes, however, Travis is a little worried that the weather temperatures have struck hot quick for potato growing. Travis shows off a seed starting tray full of tomato transplants that are ready to be planting in the garden. The several different tomato varieties he plans on planting are Bella Rosa, Celebration, Brickyard, Red Snapper, Chef's Choice Orange, Homestead, and Black Krim.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about planting sweet potato slips, using cotton gin trash compost, and squash succession planting. Travis likes to wait and plant sweet potato slips in June or sometimes even July that way he can dig them towards November. Although there as been concern about using gin trash compost, Travis and Greg are getting their compost from a gin trash company that is taking the right measurements to ensure they are creating quality grade compost that can be used in the garden area. Greg mentions when succession planting summer squash he always direct seeds and moves them over a row or two so he doesn't plant in the same exact row.<br /> Product of the Week<br /> <br /> AAS Winners<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LX8z_-1_V7A Greg and Travis 34:23 Row by Row Episode 93: All About Growing Summer Squash in the Garden https://hosstools.com/growing-summer-squash-garden/ Sat, 28 Mar 2020 21:53:54 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=74730 Planting Summer Squash When it comes to growing summer squash in the garden, there are many factors such as climate temperatures, irrigation, soil quality, and insect or disease pressures that must be controlled. Summer squash is usually the first warm-weather crop the guys recommend to plant in the vegetable garden. Guide to Growing Summer Squash Here in South Georgia, we are located in Zone 8B, therefore we plant summer squash typically as soon as temperatures become warm. Another reason behind planting summer squash early is to ensure we get around three to four rounds of squash before the squash bug pressure gets too bad in the garden. A few different varieties that we recommend growing is the patty-pan types like the Sunburst and Bennings Green Tint. When it comes to the more traditional summer squash types like the crookneck and straightneck we have varieties such as the Early Crookneck, Gentry, and Goldprize. Along with the summer squash, we have zucchini varieties such as Golden Delight, Golden Zebra, Spineless Beauty, Spineless Supreme, and Pascola. Next, the guys discuss the general rule of thumb when it comes to summer squash fertilization which is add a complete fertilizer like 20-20-20. To maintain disease control over the powdery and downy mildews we suggest Liquid Copper Fungicide or Monterey B.t. The number one factor when dealing with pests such as pickle worms, squash bugs, and vine borers is you have to control them early on to ensure they don't become a larger problem in the vegetable garden. For pest control, Travis suggests mixing the B.t. with the Neem Oil one week and then the next week the Take Down Garden Spray. Overall, when growing summer squash you must get rid of plants when production begins to decline to ensure you don't create a host for pest to live and feed off of. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Travis has a heap of Brussel sprouts that he has harvested from the vegetable garden. The different Brussel sprout varieties that he shows off is the hybrid, Jade Cross and productive open-pollinated Red Bull. The guys also discuss what crops they plan on planting coming soon in the garden. Greg is exterminating with using perlite on top of his seed starting trays after he dibbles in potting soil. The commercial growers use this perlite method to cover the top of seeds instead of using more Pro-Mix. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about when the payoff stage of onions begins, tips on growing corn on a smaller scale, planting winter squash, and the cause of having a hole in the center of potatoes. Travis mentions that you will know when the onion bulbs have begun the payoff stage because the base will start to enlarge. Greg recommends when growing a smaller scale of corn you need to make sure the corn is hilled well to help ensure strong weather conditions do not ruin the plot. When you experience having a hole in the center of potatoes, Greg mentions that it is a physiological problem that is known as a hollow heart and is most likely caused by too much or lack of irrigation. Product of the Week Complete Organic Fertilizer https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RnlycgWWLFg Planting Summer Squash When it comes to growing summer squash in the garden, there are many factors such as climate temperatures, irrigation, soil quality, and insect or disease pressures that must be controlled. Planting Summer Squash<br /> When it comes to growing summer squash in the garden, there are many factors such as climate temperatures, irrigation, soil quality, and insect or disease pressures that must be controlled. Summer squash is usually the first warm-weather crop the guys recommend to plant in the vegetable garden.<br /> Guide to Growing Summer Squash<br /> Here in South Georgia, we are located in Zone 8B, therefore we plant summer squash typically as soon as temperatures become warm. Another reason behind planting summer squash early is to ensure we get around three to four rounds of squash before the squash bug pressure gets too bad in the garden. A few different varieties that we recommend growing is the patty-pan types like the Sunburst and Bennings Green Tint. When it comes to the more traditional summer squash types like the crookneck and straightneck we have varieties such as the Early Crookneck, Gentry, and Goldprize. Along with the summer squash, we have zucchini varieties such as Golden Delight, Golden Zebra, Spineless Beauty, Spineless Supreme, and Pascola. Next, the guys discuss the general rule of thumb when it comes to summer squash fertilization which is add a complete fertilizer like 20-20-20. To maintain disease control over the powdery and downy mildews we suggest Liquid Copper Fungicide or Monterey B.t. The number one factor when dealing with pests such as pickle worms, squash bugs, and vine borers is you have to control them early on to ensure they don't become a larger problem in the vegetable garden. For pest control, Travis suggests mixing the B.t. with the Neem Oil one week and then the next week the Take Down Garden Spray. Overall, when growing summer squash you must get rid of plants when production begins to decline to ensure you don't create a host for pest to live and feed off of.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Travis has a heap of Brussel sprouts that he has harvested from the vegetable garden. The different Brussel sprout varieties that he shows off is the hybrid, Jade Cross and productive open-pollinated Red Bull. The guys also discuss what crops they plan on planting coming soon in the garden. Greg is exterminating with using perlite on top of his seed starting trays after he dibbles in potting soil. The commercial growers use this perlite method to cover the top of seeds instead of using more Pro-Mix.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about when the payoff stage of onions begins, tips on growing corn on a smaller scale, planting winter squash, and the cause of having a hole in the center of potatoes. Travis mentions that you will know when the onion bulbs have begun the payoff stage because the base will start to enlarge. Greg recommends when growing a smaller scale of corn you need to make sure the corn is hilled well to help ensure strong weather conditions do not ruin the plot. When you experience having a hole in the center of potatoes, Greg mentions that it is a physiological problem that is known as a hollow heart and is most likely caused by too much or lack of irrigation.<br /> Product of the Week<br /> <br /> Complete Organic Fertilizer<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RnlycgWWLFg Greg and Travis 45:47 Row by Row Episode 91: Using a Fertilization Schedule to Maximize Potato Harvest https://hosstools.com/using-a-fertilization-schedule-to-maximize-potato-harvest/ Mon, 09 Mar 2020 19:34:11 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=61875 Best Potato Fertilization Schedule Unlike heavy feeder crops such as corn that requires lots of fertilizer, potatoes are a little different and need a certain range of fertilizer in the vegetable garden. When discussing the nutrients that potatoes need to have successful growth Travis talks about the maximum amount and you can scale it back to the desired amount you need for your garden area. The potato fertilization schedule starts with major three nutrients which is nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium. On the higher end of the scale, nitrogen is 5 pounds per 1,000 square feet, phosphorous is 1.5 pounds per 1,000 square feet, and potassium is 5 pounds per 1,000 square feet. For the home gardener or small market farm, it is recommended to use a complete fertilizer like 20-20-20 or 10-10-10 to ensure you get all the required nutrients. Overall, if you had a 1,000 square foot of potatoes in the garden area you would need about 25 pounds of 20-20-20 throughout their lifetime growing span. Next for the fertilization schedule, we don't need to give all the nutrients at one time in the area. Therefore, the first application should be when planting potatoes, you need to put 1/3 down which can be sprinkled along the furrow. The second application of 1/3 fertilizer can be applied at emergence or around the first hilling process. The final application of the 1/3 should be applied at your last or second hilling assuming you hill potatoes at least two times. Along with the three major nutrients, potatoes also need micronutrients such as calcium, magnesium, sulfur, zinc, and boron. We recommend using Calcium Nitrate Fertilizer to ensure you get all the calcium you need and use the Micro-Juice for the other needed micronutrients. Indeterminate vs. Determinate Potatoes When talking about determinate and indeterminate potatoes it is rather different than discussing types of tomatoes. Indeterminate potatoes are described by having a later maturity date than most other varieties. While the red potatoes like Red Norland, Red Pontiac, or Red Lasoda are all early varieties, therefore, known as determinate potatoes. Some people also believe you don't need to hill determinate potatoes in the garden. However, in order to have a successful bumper crop, you will need to hill potatoes whether they're determinate or indeterminate. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, the guys discuss not plucking the greens off rutabagas to help get a large size crop in the garden. Travis shows off a Texas Legend Onion that he grew in early November that has excellent flavor and great storage life after harvesting. Travis also talks about some new flower seed varieties such as Marigold Sparky Mix, Bachelor Button Polka Dot Mix, Cosmos Bright Light Mix, Snapdragon Tetra Mix, and Zinnia Cactus Mix. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about where to get vegetable bags, mixing sand with soil for growing carrots, tips for growing squash. Travis mentions when doing his weekly produce bag operation he recommends buying produce bags from Amazon which tend to hold vegetables a little longer than other bags. Greg mentions that instead of mixing sand in the soil he suggests adding a good compost to improve the nutrient value for growing vegetables in the garden. Travis and Greg suggest that the number tip when planting squash is plant them early in the spring to ensure you avoid harsh disease and insect pressures. They also recommend applying some pest control like Spinosad, Neem Oil, or Monetery BT. Product of the Week 8 mil Drip Tape Irrigation Kit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NlO3cqybHME Best Potato Fertilization Schedule Unlike heavy feeder crops such as corn that requires lots of fertilizer, potatoes are a little different and need a certain range of fertilizer in the vegetable garden. When discussing the nutrients that potatoes nee... Best Potato Fertilization Schedule<br /> Unlike heavy feeder crops such as corn that requires lots of fertilizer, potatoes are a little different and need a certain range of fertilizer in the vegetable garden. When discussing the nutrients that potatoes need to have successful growth Travis talks about the maximum amount and you can scale it back to the desired amount you need for your garden area. The potato fertilization schedule starts with major three nutrients which is nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium. On the higher end of the scale, nitrogen is 5 pounds per 1,000 square feet, phosphorous is 1.5 pounds per 1,000 square feet, and potassium is 5 pounds per 1,000 square feet. For the home gardener or small market farm, it is recommended to use a complete fertilizer like 20-20-20 or 10-10-10 to ensure you get all the required nutrients. Overall, if you had a 1,000 square foot of potatoes in the garden area you would need about 25 pounds of 20-20-20 throughout their lifetime growing span. Next for the fertilization schedule, we don't need to give all the nutrients at one time in the area. Therefore, the first application should be when planting potatoes, you need to put 1/3 down which can be sprinkled along the furrow. The second application of 1/3 fertilizer can be applied at emergence or around the first hilling process. The final application of the 1/3 should be applied at your last or second hilling assuming you hill potatoes at least two times. Along with the three major nutrients, potatoes also need micronutrients such as calcium, magnesium, sulfur, zinc, and boron. We recommend using Calcium Nitrate Fertilizer to ensure you get all the calcium you need and use the Micro-Juice for the other needed micronutrients.<br /> Indeterminate vs. Determinate Potatoes<br /> When talking about determinate and indeterminate potatoes it is rather different than discussing types of tomatoes. Indeterminate potatoes are described by having a later maturity date than most other varieties. While the red potatoes like Red Norland, Red Pontiac, or Red Lasoda are all early varieties, therefore, known as determinate potatoes. Some people also believe you don't need to hill determinate potatoes in the garden. However, in order to have a successful bumper crop, you will need to hill potatoes whether they're determinate or indeterminate.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, the guys discuss not plucking the greens off rutabagas to help get a large size crop in the garden. Travis shows off a Texas Legend Onion that he grew in early November that has excellent flavor and great storage life after harvesting. Travis also talks about some new flower seed varieties such as Marigold Sparky Mix, Bachelor Button Polka Dot Mix, Cosmos Bright Light Mix, Snapdragon Tetra Mix, and Zinnia Cactus Mix.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about where to get vegetable bags, mixing sand with soil for growing carrots, tips for growing squash. Travis mentions when doing his weekly produce bag operation he recommends buying produce bags from Amazon which tend to hold vegetables a little longer than other bags. Greg mentions that instead of mixing sand in the soil he suggests adding a good compost to improve the nutrient value for growing vegetables in the garden. Travis and Greg suggest that the number tip when planting squash is plant them early in the spring to ensure you avoid harsh disease and insect pressures. They also recommend applying some pest control like Spinosad, Neem Oil, or Monetery BT.<br /> Product of the Week<br /> <br /> 8 mil Drip Tape Irrigation Kit<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NlO3cqybHME Greg and Travis clean 42:53 Row by Row Episode 90: Everything You Should Know About Drip Irrigation! https://hosstools.com/everything-you-should-know-about-drip-irrigation/ Mon, 09 Mar 2020 19:30:14 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=61216 Let's Talk Drip Irrigation On this week's episode, the guys answer some of the most popular frequently asked questions about drip irrigation in the vegetable garden. Although some people are intimidated by drip systems, however, it is rather simple and really a gamechanger in the garden area. The first question they answer is whether or not you can use drip tape irrigation with a gravity-fed system. Travis mentions that you can use drip tape with a gravity-fed system, but it is unfeasible overall. The second most popular question about drip irrigation is should it be buried or laid on top of the soil. Greg says you can really do either, but drip tape was designed to be buried under the soil to prevent it from being harmed by other elements. There are two ways to bury drip irrigation using our wheel hoe either with the plow set attachment or the drip tape layer attachment. Once the drip tape is in the ground, people often wonder how to know where the emitters are located after it's buried in the area. The best way that Travis determines where the emitters are once it is buried is by turning the irrigation on and around 10 to 15 minutes depending on how dry the soil is, little water spots will develop where the emitters are located. They also mention that you can plant crops in between the emitters along the drip tape irrigation. The next question that is asked often is can you save drip tape and reuse it again in the garden. The guys mention that it can be reused depending on how conservative or frugal you want to be. Travis typically pulls tape up out of the area and then cultivates the area and lays it right back down, he never pulls it completely up and tries to store it. He normally uses the same drip tape four to five times and then replaces it with new tape. Another question the guy's answer is you can certainly leave the drip tape in the garden over winter because it decompresses when it is not in use so you will never have to worry about it freezing during the winter season. The major difference between 8 mil and 15 mil tape is the 15 mil tape is almost twice as thick as the 8 mil tape. The 8 mil tape is designed for annual vegetables, while the 15 mil tape is better for perennials in the garden. When watering individual rows, you can use the drip tape row start valves which basically allows you to turn off or on individual rows that need irrigation. Another popular question is how long do you let drip irrigation run in the vegetable garden. Which is rather a hard question to answer because it depends on factors such as the climate, weather temperatures, soil type, the crop you are growing, and so much more. Greg mentions that you will get the feel for how wet it is the soil real quick and once plants start growing larger it may take longer to water, however, it all just depends on certain factors. You can also use drip irrigation in a raised bed situation it just may need more what we call tee and elbows for the mainline. When direct seeding in the garden, Greg recommends planting crops directly on top of the drip tape while planting transplants on either side of the emitters. The last question the guy's answer about drip irrigation is how to avoid hitting it with the wheel hoe. Overall, by burying it and putting it out of the way we can avoid messing it up in the vegetable garden. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, the guys discuss the different types of carrots growing in the vegetable garden. They also discuss potato planting since it has been super wet in the garden. The guys also discuss some okra varieties that have excellent flavor profiles such as Red Burgundy, Star of David, Silver Queen, Cowhorn, Perkins Long Pod, and Clemson Spineless. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about growing crops against tradition, controlling tomato spotted wilt virus, warm-weather cover crop, and growing collard greens. Let's Talk Drip Irrigation On this week's episode, the guys answer some of the most popular frequently asked questions about drip irrigation in the vegetable garden. Although some people are intimidated by drip systems, however, Let's Talk Drip Irrigation<br /> On this week's episode, the guys answer some of the most popular frequently asked questions about drip irrigation in the vegetable garden. Although some people are intimidated by drip systems, however, it is rather simple and really a gamechanger in the garden area. The first question they answer is whether or not you can use drip tape irrigation with a gravity-fed system. Travis mentions that you can use drip tape with a gravity-fed system, but it is unfeasible overall. The second most popular question about drip irrigation is should it be buried or laid on top of the soil. Greg says you can really do either, but drip tape was designed to be buried under the soil to prevent it from being harmed by other elements. There are two ways to bury drip irrigation using our wheel hoe either with the plow set attachment or the drip tape layer attachment. Once the drip tape is in the ground, people often wonder how to know where the emitters are located after it's buried in the area. The best way that Travis determines where the emitters are once it is buried is by turning the irrigation on and around 10 to 15 minutes depending on how dry the soil is, little water spots will develop where the emitters are located. They also mention that you can plant crops in between the emitters along the drip tape irrigation. The next question that is asked often is can you save drip tape and reuse it again in the garden. The guys mention that it can be reused depending on how conservative or frugal you want to be. Travis typically pulls tape up out of the area and then cultivates the area and lays it right back down, he never pulls it completely up and tries to store it. He normally uses the same drip tape four to five times and then replaces it with new tape. Another question the guy's answer is you can certainly leave the drip tape in the garden over winter because it decompresses when it is not in use so you will never have to worry about it freezing during the winter season. The major difference between 8 mil and 15 mil tape is the 15 mil tape is almost twice as thick as the 8 mil tape. The 8 mil tape is designed for annual vegetables, while the 15 mil tape is better for perennials in the garden. When watering individual rows, you can use the drip tape row start valves which basically allows you to turn off or on individual rows that need irrigation. Another popular question is how long do you let drip irrigation run in the vegetable garden. Which is rather a hard question to answer because it depends on factors such as the climate, weather temperatures, soil type, the crop you are growing, and so much more. Greg mentions that you will get the feel for how wet it is the soil real quick and once plants start growing larger it may take longer to water, however, it all just depends on certain factors. You can also use drip irrigation in a raised bed situation it just may need more what we call tee and elbows for the mainline. When direct seeding in the garden, Greg recommends planting crops directly on top of the drip tape while planting transplants on either side of the emitters. The last question the guy's answer about drip irrigation is how to avoid hitting it with the wheel hoe. Overall, by burying it and putting it out of the way we can avoid messing it up in the vegetable garden.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, the guys discuss the different types of carrots growing in the vegetable garden. They also discuss potato planting since it has been super wet in the garden. The guys also discuss some okra varieties that have excellent flavor profiles such as Red Burgundy, Star of David, Silver Queen, Cowhorn, Perkins Long Pod, and Clemson Spineless.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about growing crops against tradition, controlling tomato spotted wilt virus, warm-weather cover crop, Greg and Travis clean 48:51 Row by Row Episode 89: The Best New Tomato Varieties Available https://hosstools.com/best-new-tomato-varieties-available/ Mon, 09 Mar 2020 15:00:31 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=59888 Planting Different Tomato Varieties Since it's time to plant potatoes in the garden area, it's also the perfect time to start planting tomato varieties in the greenhouse. Here in Zone 8, the ideal time to start planting tomato seeds in the seed starting trays is around February 15th. Typically, the tomato seedlings will take six weeks to germinate which puts us planting tomato transplants in the soil right around the 1st of April. Heirloom, Indeterminate Amish Paste Brandywine Pink Cherokee Purple Black Krim Jubilee Mortgage Lifter Sweetie Cherry Yellow Pear Heirloom, Determinate Homestead Hybrid, Indeterminate Black Cherry Zebra Chef's Choice Orange Sun Gold Hybrid, Determinate Mountain Glory Celebration SummerPick Tachi Red Snapper Brickyard Bella Rosa Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Travis has some watermelon radishes that typically have more of a bite than a normal traditional radish. The next crop that he has to show off this week is the Chioggia Beet variety. As the most visually appealing beet, this variety offers a less earthy flavor and a more sugary content profile than other red beets. As well another large cabbage variety, known as the Rio Grande which probably weighs around 15 to 20 pounds. The guys also do a little show and tell on the new seed varieties coming soon. The four new varieties on the site include Gentry Squash, Gold Star Squash, Pascola Zucchini, and Spineless Supreme Zucchini. As well as three new watermelon varieties which are supposed to be sweeter than our popular Crimson Sweet variety. These varieties include Dulce Fantasia, Sangria, and Jamboree watermelon. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about pelleted seeds, preserving corn seed, preventing mildew on cucumbers, and the best way to grow corn in the vegetable garden. Travis mentions that he thinks with pelleted seeds they may need a little bit more water than non-pelleted seeds. Also, with pelleted seeds, they don't have a shelf life that will last nearly as long as unpelleted seeds. Greg says when preserving corn seed for next season it is recommended that you keep the seeds at least 1600 feet away from other varieties to ensure they do not cross-pollinate. Once you gather the seeds you want to save you will need to place them in the freezer for at least two weeks to keep the weevils out of them. If you are trying to prevent mildew on cucumbers, Travis recommends growing powdery mildew resistant varieties. The two varieties we have available that offer this disease package resistance is the Diomede and the Max Pack. When growing corn, Greg mentions that you know when there is enough fertilizer because you can see where you've burnt the edge of the leaf a little bit. The way he likes to add the fertilizer in the garden is by putting down a balanced fertilizer and every other time hit it with a nitrogen source. Product of the Week Tomato Varieties https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hsqwo-5HSYY Planting Different Tomato Varieties Since it's time to plant potatoes in the garden area, it's also the perfect time to start planting tomato varieties in the greenhouse. Here in Zone 8, the ideal time to start planting tomato seeds in the seed starti... Planting Different Tomato Varieties<br /> Since it's time to plant potatoes in the garden area, it's also the perfect time to start planting tomato varieties in the greenhouse. Here in Zone 8, the ideal time to start planting tomato seeds in the seed starting trays is around February 15th. Typically, the tomato seedlings will take six weeks to germinate which puts us planting tomato transplants in the soil right around the 1st of April.<br /> Heirloom, Indeterminate<br /> <br /> Amish Paste<br /> Brandywine Pink<br /> Cherokee Purple<br /> Black Krim<br /> Jubilee<br /> Mortgage Lifter<br /> Sweetie Cherry<br /> Yellow Pear<br /> <br /> Heirloom, Determinate<br /> <br /> Homestead<br /> <br /> Hybrid, Indeterminate<br /> <br /> Black Cherry Zebra<br /> Chef's Choice Orange<br /> Sun Gold<br /> <br /> Hybrid, Determinate<br /> <br /> Mountain Glory<br /> Celebration<br /> SummerPick<br /> Tachi<br /> Red Snapper<br /> Brickyard<br /> Bella Rosa<br /> <br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Travis has some watermelon radishes that typically have more of a bite than a normal traditional radish. The next crop that he has to show off this week is the Chioggia Beet variety. As the most visually appealing beet, this variety offers a less earthy flavor and a more sugary content profile than other red beets. As well another large cabbage variety, known as the Rio Grande which probably weighs around 15 to 20 pounds. The guys also do a little show and tell on the new seed varieties coming soon. The four new varieties on the site include Gentry Squash, Gold Star Squash, Pascola Zucchini, and Spineless Supreme Zucchini. As well as three new watermelon varieties which are supposed to be sweeter than our popular Crimson Sweet variety. These varieties include Dulce Fantasia, Sangria, and Jamboree watermelon.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about pelleted seeds, preserving corn seed, preventing mildew on cucumbers, and the best way to grow corn in the vegetable garden. Travis mentions that he thinks with pelleted seeds they may need a little bit more water than non-pelleted seeds. Also, with pelleted seeds, they don't have a shelf life that will last nearly as long as unpelleted seeds. Greg says when preserving corn seed for next season it is recommended that you keep the seeds at least 1600 feet away from other varieties to ensure they do not cross-pollinate. Once you gather the seeds you want to save you will need to place them in the freezer for at least two weeks to keep the weevils out of them. If you are trying to prevent mildew on cucumbers, Travis recommends growing powdery mildew resistant varieties. The two varieties we have available that offer this disease package resistance is the Diomede and the Max Pack. When growing corn, Greg mentions that you know when there is enough fertilizer because you can see where you've burnt the edge of the leaf a little bit. The way he likes to add the fertilizer in the garden is by putting down a balanced fertilizer and every other time hit it with a nitrogen source.<br /> Product of the Week<br /> <br /> Tomato Varieties<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hsqwo-5HSYY Greg and Travis clean 45:01 Row by Row Episode 92: Answering All Your Gardening Questions! https://hosstools.com/answering-all-your-gardening-questions/ Mon, 09 Mar 2020 14:52:54 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=62682 Gardening Questions On this week's episode, Greg and Travis answer several gardening questions that are asked by multiple customers.  The first question the guys answer on this week's episode is whether to use two or three-foot row spacing when planting corn. Travis mentions that he has made the mistake of planting on two-foot row spacing which results in poor pollination and unhealthy crops. The second question they discuss is the difference in fertilization methods between raised beds and ground gardening. Greg indicates that it depends on the type of medium you have in the raised beds, however, they do drain better and you will experience more water leaching in a raised bed. The fertilization method that Greg recommends using as Complete Organic Fertilizer to ensure you the get needed amount of fertilizer. Next on the gardening questions list is there any sweet corn varieties that grow well without irrigation. Although all sweet corn loves water, the one variety that can grow without irrigation is the Stowells Evergreen. When discussing a shift in growing seasons using a high tunnel greenhouse, the guys recommend moving crops up a couple of weeks according to your planting zone to coordinate with the growing conditions in the high tunnel. The three crops that do wonders when starting out in a high tunnel greenhouse are summer squash, lettuce, and indeterminate tomatoes. The fifth question is rather different and interesting to think about which was what did the pioneers do for fertilizer before they could just run down to the hardware store and buy it. The guys suggest the most ideal way they think the pioneer's used fertilizer is by establishing a grazing program with their livestock and a fallow ground program to let the soil rest and build up the nutrient levels by using the livestock manure. The guys also give their best advice for growing artichokes and asparagus around the homestead. However, Greg mentions that if you love asparagus you should be growing it on the homestead. Travis shows off a couple of shallots and needs some help to determine why some are splitting off and others aren't in the garden. They list off a couple of recommendations for growing winter squash such as give them plenty of room to grow and plant early to avoid disease pressures. Another common question is how to rotate different crops in a single plot garden area. Greg has experienced this issue before in the garden if you aren't able to rotate crops you can just move 10 feet over and the vegetables should be fine. Travis mentions that the best way to grow beets is by transplanting to ensure you get them uniformly spaced. If you have trouble growing all greens instead of beets that most likely means you have too much nitrogen and not enough phosphorus and potassium. When it comes to traditional gardening beds, it is recommended that watering ornamentals should be one inch per week. The last question that has been asked is whether or not we can build an attachment for the wheel hoe that would allow you to side-dress your plants. Once the guys started using the injection system the need for a side dressing attachment is kind of on the back burner right now but may come available in the future. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, the guys talk new pepper seed varieties such as Touchdown Bell Pepper, Mama Mia Giallo, Mama Mia Rosso, Cinder Jalapeno, Lola Banana Pepper, and Santa Fe Grande. Product of the Week Hoss Hat https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F-6HDwtb8UA Gardening Questions On this week's episode, Greg and Travis answer several gardening questions that are asked by multiple customers.  The first question the guys answer on this week's episode is whether to use two or three-foot row spacing when planti... Gardening Questions<br /> On this week's episode, Greg and Travis answer several gardening questions that are asked by multiple customers.  The first question the guys answer on this week's episode is whether to use two or three-foot row spacing when planting corn. Travis mentions that he has made the mistake of planting on two-foot row spacing which results in poor pollination and unhealthy crops. The second question they discuss is the difference in fertilization methods between raised beds and ground gardening. Greg indicates that it depends on the type of medium you have in the raised beds, however, they do drain better and you will experience more water leaching in a raised bed. The fertilization method that Greg recommends using as Complete Organic Fertilizer to ensure you the get needed amount of fertilizer. Next on the gardening questions list is there any sweet corn varieties that grow well without irrigation. Although all sweet corn loves water, the one variety that can grow without irrigation is the Stowells Evergreen. When discussing a shift in growing seasons using a high tunnel greenhouse, the guys recommend moving crops up a couple of weeks according to your planting zone to coordinate with the growing conditions in the high tunnel. The three crops that do wonders when starting out in a high tunnel greenhouse are summer squash, lettuce, and indeterminate tomatoes. The fifth question is rather different and interesting to think about which was what did the pioneers do for fertilizer before they could just run down to the hardware store and buy it. The guys suggest the most ideal way they think the pioneer's used fertilizer is by establishing a grazing program with their livestock and a fallow ground program to let the soil rest and build up the nutrient levels by using the livestock manure. The guys also give their best advice for growing artichokes and asparagus around the homestead. However, Greg mentions that if you love asparagus you should be growing it on the homestead. Travis shows off a couple of shallots and needs some help to determine why some are splitting off and others aren't in the garden. They list off a couple of recommendations for growing winter squash such as give them plenty of room to grow and plant early to avoid disease pressures. Another common question is how to rotate different crops in a single plot garden area. Greg has experienced this issue before in the garden if you aren't able to rotate crops you can just move 10 feet over and the vegetables should be fine. Travis mentions that the best way to grow beets is by transplanting to ensure you get them uniformly spaced. If you have trouble growing all greens instead of beets that most likely means you have too much nitrogen and not enough phosphorus and potassium. When it comes to traditional gardening beds, it is recommended that watering ornamentals should be one inch per week. The last question that has been asked is whether or not we can build an attachment for the wheel hoe that would allow you to side-dress your plants. Once the guys started using the injection system the need for a side dressing attachment is kind of on the back burner right now but may come available in the future.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, the guys talk new pepper seed varieties such as Touchdown Bell Pepper, Mama Mia Giallo, Mama Mia Rosso, Cinder Jalapeno, Lola Banana Pepper, and Santa Fe Grande.<br /> Product of the Week<br /> <br /> Hoss Hat<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F-6HDwtb8UA Greg and Travis 50:14 Row by Row Episode 88: The Most Popular Seed Varieties of 2019 https://hosstools.com/popular-seed-varieties/ Wed, 12 Feb 2020 19:56:01 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=59101 Most Popular Seed Varieties The guys discuss the 15 most popular seed varieties that were chosen by customers as bestsellers. All of these seed varieties are excellent for growing in the vegetable garden and offer some of the best production and flavor profiles throughout the growing season. Jambalaya Okra The most popular seed variety that we have available at Hoss Tools is the Jambalaya Okra. As the most productive okra crop, this variety has heavy yields of green pods with excellent flavor profiles. We recommend transplanting in okra in early spring to get a jump start on the growing season. Red Burgundy Okra Not the most productive okra variety that we have available the Red Burgundy Okra is one of the best pickling varieties according to Greg. This okra variety produces deep red pods that will remain tender at even longer pod lengths. Tiger Collard Once we sell out of the Tiger Collards variety it will soon be replaced with the Top Bunch 2.0 collards. The Top Bunch 2.0 is the newest generation in the Top Bunch collard line. This is a hybrid variety that is great for early-maturing and will grow fast in the vegetable garden. Bella Rosa Tomato The Bella Rosa is an heirloom variety that performs best in hot and humid climates. Out of all the popular seed varieties, the Bella Rosa is the top performer for continuing to set fruits once temperatures become warmer in early summer. Brickyard Tomato As the most comprehensive disease-resistant package the Brickyard Tomatoes do best when planted in seed starting trays. Tomatoes can produce heavy fruits and will require some form of trellising system to support the plants throughout the growing season. Goldprize Squash As a highly productive squash, the Goldprize variety is a straightneck that offers excellent flavor profiles, texture, and storage potential. Throughout the growing season, squash is a crop that will require multiple harvests within the garden area. Stonewall Cucumber The Stonewall Cucumber is a hybrid slicer variety that offers improved yields, great disease-resistance, and exceptional consistency. It does best when direct seeded in the garden area and is a vining plant that will need a strong trellising system in place as it grows throughout the season. Green Magic Broccoli Out of all the popular seed varieties, the Green Magic Broccoli is one of the most popular broccoli varieties. This heat-tolerant broccoli can be grown in spring and earlier in the fall than other varieties. We recommend transplanting broccoli to ensure you get maximum production and better plants. Calypso Cucumber Another popular cucumber variety is the Calypso cucumber which is gynoecious meaning it produces all-female flowers for increased productivity and higher yields. This hybrid variety offers a strong disease package and early production within the vegetable garden. Jimmy Red Corn If you are looking for a variety of corn to grind for making grits and corn mill the Jimmy Red is the ideal variety for just that. We recommend planting corn using a walk-behind planter like our garden seeder that makes planting easy and allows you to customize your planting to meet your exact needs. Rattlesnake Pole Beans A very popular variety of beans to grow in the vegetable garden is the Rattlesnake Pole Beans. This heirloom variety has vigorous plants that grow up to 10 inches when trellised and produce around 6 to 7-inch pods that can be harvested frequently throughout the growing season. Spineless Beauty Zucchini The Spineless Beauty Zucchini is another hybrid variety that provides an exceptional production, increased storage, and disease package in the garden. The variety has spineless petioles which mean there is no itching sensation during and after harvesting zucchini. Benary Giant Zinnia Mix Along with growing vegetables in the garden, it is also great to plant cut flowers in the area. The Benary Giant Zinnia Mix contains a bountiful assortment of colorful flowers thro... Most Popular Seed Varieties The guys discuss the 15 most popular seed varieties that were chosen by customers as bestsellers. All of these seed varieties are excellent for growing in the vegetable garden and offer some of the best production and flavo... Most Popular Seed Varieties<br /> The guys discuss the 15 most popular seed varieties that were chosen by customers as bestsellers. All of these seed varieties are excellent for growing in the vegetable garden and offer some of the best production and flavor profiles throughout the growing season.<br /> Jambalaya Okra <br /> The most popular seed variety that we have available at Hoss Tools is the Jambalaya Okra. As the most productive okra crop, this variety has heavy yields of green pods with excellent flavor profiles. We recommend transplanting in okra in early spring to get a jump start on the growing season.<br /> Red Burgundy Okra<br /> Not the most productive okra variety that we have available the Red Burgundy Okra is one of the best pickling varieties according to Greg. This okra variety produces deep red pods that will remain tender at even longer pod lengths.<br /> Tiger Collard<br /> Once we sell out of the Tiger Collards variety it will soon be replaced with the Top Bunch 2.0 collards. The Top Bunch 2.0 is the newest generation in the Top Bunch collard line. This is a hybrid variety that is great for early-maturing and will grow fast in the vegetable garden.<br /> Bella Rosa Tomato<br /> The Bella Rosa is an heirloom variety that performs best in hot and humid climates. Out of all the popular seed varieties, the Bella Rosa is the top performer for continuing to set fruits once temperatures become warmer in early summer.<br /> Brickyard Tomato<br /> As the most comprehensive disease-resistant package the Brickyard Tomatoes do best when planted in seed starting trays. Tomatoes can produce heavy fruits and will require some form of trellising system to support the plants throughout the growing season.<br /> Goldprize Squash<br /> As a highly productive squash, the Goldprize variety is a straightneck that offers excellent flavor profiles, texture, and storage potential. Throughout the growing season, squash is a crop that will require multiple harvests within the garden area.<br /> Stonewall Cucumber<br /> The Stonewall Cucumber is a hybrid slicer variety that offers improved yields, great disease-resistance, and exceptional consistency. It does best when direct seeded in the garden area and is a vining plant that will need a strong trellising system in place as it grows throughout the season.<br /> Green Magic Broccoli<br /> Out of all the popular seed varieties, the Green Magic Broccoli is one of the most popular broccoli varieties. This heat-tolerant broccoli can be grown in spring and earlier in the fall than other varieties. We recommend transplanting broccoli to ensure you get maximum production and better plants.<br /> Calypso Cucumber<br /> Another popular cucumber variety is the Calypso cucumber which is gynoecious meaning it produces all-female flowers for increased productivity and higher yields. This hybrid variety offers a strong disease package and early production within the vegetable garden.<br /> Jimmy Red Corn<br /> If you are looking for a variety of corn to grind for making grits and corn mill the Jimmy Red is the ideal variety for just that. We recommend planting corn using a walk-behind planter like our garden seeder that makes planting easy and allows you to customize your planting to meet your exact needs.<br /> Rattlesnake Pole Beans<br /> A very popular variety of beans to grow in the vegetable garden is the Rattlesnake Pole Beans. This heirloom variety has vigorous plants that grow up to 10 inches when trellised and produce around 6 to 7-inch pods that can be harvested frequently throughout the growing season.<br /> Spineless Beauty Zucchini<br /> The Spineless Beauty Zucchini is another hybrid variety that provides an exceptional production, increased storage, and disease package in the garden. The variety has spineless petioles which mean there is no itching sensation during and after harvesting zucchini.<br /> Benary Giant Zinnia Mix<br /> Greg and Travis clean 38:21 Row by Row Episode 87: Transplanting Crops in the Vegetable Garden https://hosstools.com/transplanting-crops-vegetable-garden/ Fri, 31 Jan 2020 21:57:59 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=58675 Transplanting Crops vs. Direct Seeding When comes to transplanting crops and which are best for direct seeding it can vary depending on the several different plant varieties. For transplanting crops like beets you can either transplant or direct seed in the garden. Travis mentions in order to get consistently sized beets you must thin them and he prefers to do this in the greenhouse rather than on his knees inside the vegetable garden. The three other transplanting crops that are without a doubt better transplanted are broccoli, Brussel sprouts, and cabbage plants. Another crop that can be transplanted or direct seeded is cantaloupes and it is beneficial to transplant if you like in a climate where the warm growing season isn't as long. When it comes to collards you can direct seed or transplant depending on how and what variety you are planting in the garden. Another crop that can be transplanted or direct seeded is okra because it does not like cooler soils you are able to get a head start on growing if you transplant okra. When direct seeding crops such as beans, carrots, corn, cucumbers, greens, peanuts, radishes, etc all do better direct seeded in the vegetable garden. The advantage of transplanting crops is you will get a head start on planting which is really effective for areas that experience really high disease or insect pressures. Another advantage of transplanting is you get a head start on the weed pressure, especially with slower germinating crops. Transplant Crops Brocolli Brussel Sprouts Cabbage Cauliflower Eggplant Kohlrabi Leeks Onions Peppers Tomatoes Watermelon Direct Seed Beans Carrots Corn Cucumbers Greens Peanuts Field Peas Radishes Spinach Summer Squash Direct Seed + Transplant Beets Cantaloupes Collards Gourds English Peas Kale Lettuce Okra Pumpkins Rutabaga Winter Squash Swiss Chard Turnips Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Travis has grown some of the Mr. Big English Pea variety for the first time in the garden. The guys address the comments about the egg in the hole feedback on last week's garden show video. Greg shows off some of his Cheers and Jersey Wakefield cabbage from the vegetable garden. Greg also has his ghost pepper seeds in the freezer so he will get a better stratification process and quicker germination when he gets ready to plant them. The guys give an update on potatoes and hope to get them in and ready to ship next week. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about rotating in a small garden, advice for growing watermelons, and amending pH for every crop. Travis mentions that can be more difficult to manage crop rotation in one small garden, however, you just have to be more mindful of what crops you are planting in the area year after year. He also mentions that it is really beneficial if you are utilizing cover crops that will help with incorporating nutrients back into the soils. Greg gives three tips for growing watermelons which is to give them plenty of room, use drip irrigation, and attract natural pollinators to the area. Greg mentions the ideal way to control your pH for planting is to plant new seeds in a new spot every year and work it into your rotation. Product of the Week Cherokee Lettuce https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SpaX3Lp7lgM Transplanting Crops vs. Direct Seeding When comes to transplanting crops and which are best for direct seeding it can vary depending on the several different plant varieties. For transplanting crops like beets you can either transplant or direct seed ... Transplanting Crops vs. Direct Seeding<br /> When comes to transplanting crops and which are best for direct seeding it can vary depending on the several different plant varieties. For transplanting crops like beets you can either transplant or direct seed in the garden. Travis mentions in order to get consistently sized beets you must thin them and he prefers to do this in the greenhouse rather than on his knees inside the vegetable garden. The three other transplanting crops that are without a doubt better transplanted are broccoli, Brussel sprouts, and cabbage plants. Another crop that can be transplanted or direct seeded is cantaloupes and it is beneficial to transplant if you like in a climate where the warm growing season isn't as long. When it comes to collards you can direct seed or transplant depending on how and what variety you are planting in the garden. Another crop that can be transplanted or direct seeded is okra because it does not like cooler soils you are able to get a head start on growing if you transplant okra. When direct seeding crops such as beans, carrots, corn, cucumbers, greens, peanuts, radishes, etc all do better direct seeded in the vegetable garden. The advantage of transplanting crops is you will get a head start on planting which is really effective for areas that experience really high disease or insect pressures. Another advantage of transplanting is you get a head start on the weed pressure, especially with slower germinating crops.<br /> Transplant Crops<br /> <br /> Brocolli<br /> Brussel Sprouts<br /> Cabbage<br /> Cauliflower<br /> Eggplant<br /> Kohlrabi<br /> Leeks<br /> Onions<br /> Peppers<br /> Tomatoes<br /> Watermelon<br /> <br /> Direct Seed<br /> <br /> Beans<br /> Carrots<br /> Corn<br /> Cucumbers<br /> Greens<br /> Peanuts<br /> Field Peas<br /> Radishes<br /> Spinach<br /> Summer Squash<br /> <br /> Direct Seed + Transplant<br /> <br /> Beets<br /> Cantaloupes<br /> Collards<br /> Gourds<br /> English Peas<br /> Kale<br /> Lettuce<br /> Okra<br /> Pumpkins<br /> Rutabaga<br /> Winter Squash<br /> Swiss Chard<br /> Turnips<br /> <br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Travis has grown some of the Mr. Big English Pea variety for the first time in the garden. The guys address the comments about the egg in the hole feedback on last week's garden show video. Greg shows off some of his Cheers and Jersey Wakefield cabbage from the vegetable garden. Greg also has his ghost pepper seeds in the freezer so he will get a better stratification process and quicker germination when he gets ready to plant them. The guys give an update on potatoes and hope to get them in and ready to ship next week.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about rotating in a small garden, advice for growing watermelons, and amending pH for every crop. Travis mentions that can be more difficult to manage crop rotation in one small garden, however, you just have to be more mindful of what crops you are planting in the area year after year. He also mentions that it is really beneficial if you are utilizing cover crops that will help with incorporating nutrients back into the soils. Greg gives three tips for growing watermelons which is to give them plenty of room, use drip irrigation, and attract natural pollinators to the area. Greg mentions the ideal way to control your pH for planting is to plant new seeds in a new spot every year and work it into your rotation.<br /> Product of the Week<br /> <br /> Cherokee Lettuce<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SpaX3Lp7lgM Greg and Travis clean 39:54 Row by Row Episode 86: Crop Rotation Strategies for the Vegetable Garden https://hosstools.com/different-crop-rotation-strategies-garden/ Wed, 29 Jan 2020 21:21:07 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=58293 Crop Rotation Strategies If you fail to incorporate effective crop rotation strategies in the vegetable garden, you can experience recurring pests and disease problems that will become greater year after year. It is crucial to establish the right crop rotation strategies to eliminate these problems. Our goal is to not plant the same family of crops in the same spot in consecutive years. Crops in the Same Family Travis shows a comprehensive list of vegetables and their respective families. The first family of crops is Solanaceae, commonly known as the nightshades. This family includes popular vegetable crops like tomatoes, eggplants, peppers, and potatoes. Most folks don't realize that potatoes are closely related to the other crops in the nightshade family. As a result, you wouldn't want to plant tomatoes, peppers or eggplant in the same spot as potatoes in a given year. If you are not careful to rotate these crops, you will almost certainly experience some blight issues that will intensify over time. The next family is Cucurbitaceae, also known as the Cucurbits. This family includes crops like summer squash, winter squash, pumpkins, cucumbers, watermelons, cantaloupes, and gourds. All of the crops in the Cucurbit family can have issues with powdery mildew and downy mildew, so rotating these crops ensures those disease problems will not increase year after year. Cucurbits also tend to have high insect pressure with pests like squash bugs, squash vine borers and pickle worms. The next family is the Brassicas, which is one of the most popular families of crops grown in the vegetable garden. The brassica family includes mustards, cauliflower, cabbage, broccoli, kohlrabi, bok choy, rutabagas, turnips, and radishes. Brassicas can have recurring pest issues if not rotated properly, especially with worms that will chew and eat the plant leaves. Below is a list of all the important crop families for a vegetable garden: Nightshades: Tomatoes Eggplants Peppers Potatoes Cucurbits: Summer Squash Winter Squash Pumpkins Cucumbers Watermelon Cantaloupes Gourds Brassicas: Mustard Cabbage Cauliflower Broccoli Turnips Kohlrabi Radish Rutabagas Boy Choy Alliums: Onions Shallots Leeks Garlic Scallions Chives Legumes: Beans English Peas Winter Peas Field Peas Peanuts Clover Sunn Hemp Hairy Vetch Umbellifers: Carrots Cilantro Celery Parsley Dill Parsnips Amaranth: Beets Chard Spinach Pigweed Grasses: Corn Wheat Barley Sorghum Sudangrass Mallow: Okra Cotton Hibiscus Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, the guys sample a few varieties of raw greens including Tatsoi, Arugula, and Savanna Mustard. Greg provides an update on his multiplying onions and guinea nest onions from the garden. He also discusses the Ghost Peppers that are now available. He mentions they are limited and will sell quickly. The guys also mention that 20 more seed varieties will be added by the end of January. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about seed starting schedules, cleaning seed trays, favorite tomato varieties, and moving plants from the greenhouse. Travis mentions that his ideal seed starting schedule is to plant early spring crops such as lettuce, cabbage, cauliflower, etc., now. And he'll start planting peppers in late January or early February. In mid-February, he will start planting tomatoes and eggplants, and towards the end of February start planting okra, watermelons, pumpkins, zinnias, and sunflowers. Greg says that he never really cleans his trays using bleach or anything. However, he does let his trays dry completely for a few days or weeks before planting again. The guys mention that their favorite tomato for flavor is the Sun Gold variety and the Bella Rosa variety for ... Crop Rotation Strategies If you fail to incorporate effective crop rotation strategies in the vegetable garden, you can experience recurring pests and disease problems that will become greater year after year. Crop Rotation Strategies<br /> If you fail to incorporate effective crop rotation strategies in the vegetable garden, you can experience recurring pests and disease problems that will become greater year after year. It is crucial to establish the right crop rotation strategies to eliminate these problems. Our goal is to not plant the same family of crops in the same spot in consecutive years.<br /> Crops in the Same Family<br /> Travis shows a comprehensive list of vegetables and their respective families. The first family of crops is Solanaceae, commonly known as the nightshades. This family includes popular vegetable crops like tomatoes, eggplants, peppers, and potatoes. Most folks don't realize that potatoes are closely related to the other crops in the nightshade family. As a result, you wouldn't want to plant tomatoes, peppers or eggplant in the same spot as potatoes in a given year. If you are not careful to rotate these crops, you will almost certainly experience some blight issues that will intensify over time.<br /> <br /> The next family is Cucurbitaceae, also known as the Cucurbits. This family includes crops like summer squash, winter squash, pumpkins, cucumbers, watermelons, cantaloupes, and gourds. All of the crops in the Cucurbit family can have issues with powdery mildew and downy mildew, so rotating these crops ensures those disease problems will not increase year after year. Cucurbits also tend to have high insect pressure with pests like squash bugs, squash vine borers and pickle worms.<br /> <br /> The next family is the Brassicas, which is one of the most popular families of crops grown in the vegetable garden. The brassica family includes mustards, cauliflower, cabbage, broccoli, kohlrabi, bok choy, rutabagas, turnips, and radishes. Brassicas can have recurring pest issues if not rotated properly, especially with worms that will chew and eat the plant leaves.<br /> <br /> Below is a list of all the important crop families for a vegetable garden:<br /> Nightshades:<br /> <br /> Tomatoes<br /> Eggplants<br /> Peppers<br /> Potatoes<br /> <br /> Cucurbits:<br /> <br /> Summer Squash<br /> Winter Squash<br /> Pumpkins<br /> Cucumbers<br /> Watermelon<br /> Cantaloupes<br /> Gourds<br /> <br /> Brassicas:<br /> <br /> Mustard<br /> Cabbage<br /> Cauliflower<br /> Broccoli<br /> Turnips<br /> Kohlrabi<br /> Radish<br /> Rutabagas<br /> Boy Choy<br /> <br /> Alliums:<br /> <br /> Onions<br /> Shallots<br /> Leeks<br /> Garlic<br /> Scallions<br /> Chives<br /> <br /> Legumes:<br /> <br /> Beans<br /> English Peas<br /> Winter Peas<br /> Field Peas<br /> Peanuts<br /> Clover<br /> Sunn Hemp<br /> Hairy Vetch<br /> <br /> Umbellifers:<br /> <br /> Carrots<br /> Cilantro<br /> Celery<br /> Parsley<br /> Dill<br /> Parsnips<br /> <br /> Amaranth:<br /> <br /> Beets<br /> Chard<br /> Spinach<br /> Pigweed<br /> <br /> Grasses:<br /> <br /> Corn<br /> Wheat<br /> Barley<br /> Sorghum Sudangrass<br /> <br /> Mallow:<br /> <br /> Okra<br /> Cotton<br /> Hibiscus<br /> <br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, the guys sample a few varieties of raw greens including Tatsoi, Arugula, and Savanna Mustard. Greg provides an update on his multiplying onions and guinea nest onions from the garden. He also discusses the Ghost Peppers that are now available. He mentions they are limited and will sell quickly. The guys also mention that 20 more seed varieties will be added by the end of January.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about seed starting schedules, cleaning seed trays, favorite tomato varieties, and moving plants from the greenhouse. Travis mentions that his ideal seed starting schedule is to plant early spring crops such as lettuc... Greg and Travis clean 41:35 Row by Row Episode 85: The Seed Starting Guide for the Garden https://hosstools.com/the-seed-starting-guide-garden/ Sun, 19 Jan 2020 19:04:47 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=57844 Guide to Seed Starting During the seed starting process, there are many aspects that can control the success or failure of growing quality vegetable transplants. The first thing that people sometimes question is why can't they simply dig up soil out of the yard and place it in seed starting trays. Greg explains you can do this but it's not going to work out well and is highly not recommended. Therefore, we recommend using a Pro-Mix Seed Starting Mix to ensure you get the needed amount of peat moss, perlite, and vermiculite when growing transplants. While applying the mix it also needs plenty of water initially to get the seeds wet in the tray cells. The guys recommend using a Dramm wand which is included in our Premium Seed Starting Kit. After the mix is nice and moist, you can start to prepare the tray for planting seeds. When using your fingers to create indentions they should be in the middle of the cell to improve seed planting. When it comes to planting depth it is ideal if you plant on average twice as deep as the diameter of your seed. If you live in an area similar to us in the South and you are growing crops such as beets or radishes you will not have to worry about using a heating mat underneath the trays because those crops will germinate in coolish type conditions. However, for summer crops like peppers or tomatoes, it's important to provide a heat mat underneath the trays to help with the temperatures. When growing indoors the trick to providing the ideal amount of light is to get led shop lights with a natural daylight bulb color and place them over the plant you are trying to grow. The guys also recommend watering at least 2 to 3 times a day until the roots reach the bottom of the cells. Once the plants start to get their true leaves or second set of leaves become more prominent that is the ideal time to start spoon feeding at least 1 to 2 times a week with fertilizer. There are several different ways to add fertilizer to the growing plants, but Travis recommends using 20-20-20 in a watering can and sprinkling along the top of the plants. However, the plants are really delicate so you have to be sure and not over-fertilize them which can cause them to burn. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, the guys discuss the weather conditions that are currently happening in the garden and how it can affect some vegetables and fruit trees. Travis also announces that he will be attending Deep South Homestead Gathering on March 21st in Perkinston, Mississippi, so be sure to stop by and see him. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about ball zucchini, treating cut potato pieces, and the recommend amount of 20-20-20 that is equivalent to 10-10-10. We currently have one variety of ball zucchini known as Eight Ball Squash which contains a darker green exterior with excellent texture and flavor profile. Greg mentions that in the past he has used fir bark dust as a fungicide on potato seed pieces, but he cannot see any difference from when he does and doesn't use it in the garden. Greg mentions when using 20-20-20 you would want to use half as much as you would 10-10-10 because it is twice the strength. However, if you are using a water-soluble liquid or granular form it can change the recommended amount. Product of the Week 338 Seed Starting Trays https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o048L65ufaQ Guide to Seed Starting During the seed starting process, there are many aspects that can control the success or failure of growing quality vegetable transplants. The first thing that people sometimes question is why can't they simply dig up soil out o... Guide to Seed Starting<br /> During the seed starting process, there are many aspects that can control the success or failure of growing quality vegetable transplants. The first thing that people sometimes question is why can't they simply dig up soil out of the yard and place it in seed starting trays. Greg explains you can do this but it's not going to work out well and is highly not recommended. Therefore, we recommend using a Pro-Mix Seed Starting Mix to ensure you get the needed amount of peat moss, perlite, and vermiculite when growing transplants. While applying the mix it also needs plenty of water initially to get the seeds wet in the tray cells. The guys recommend using a Dramm wand which is included in our Premium Seed Starting Kit. After the mix is nice and moist, you can start to prepare the tray for planting seeds. When using your fingers to create indentions they should be in the middle of the cell to improve seed planting. When it comes to planting depth it is ideal if you plant on average twice as deep as the diameter of your seed. If you live in an area similar to us in the South and you are growing crops such as beets or radishes you will not have to worry about using a heating mat underneath the trays because those crops will germinate in coolish type conditions. However, for summer crops like peppers or tomatoes, it's important to provide a heat mat underneath the trays to help with the temperatures. When growing indoors the trick to providing the ideal amount of light is to get led shop lights with a natural daylight bulb color and place them over the plant you are trying to grow. The guys also recommend watering at least 2 to 3 times a day until the roots reach the bottom of the cells. Once the plants start to get their true leaves or second set of leaves become more prominent that is the ideal time to start spoon feeding at least 1 to 2 times a week with fertilizer. There are several different ways to add fertilizer to the growing plants, but Travis recommends using 20-20-20 in a watering can and sprinkling along the top of the plants. However, the plants are really delicate so you have to be sure and not over-fertilize them which can cause them to burn.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, the guys discuss the weather conditions that are currently happening in the garden and how it can affect some vegetables and fruit trees. Travis also announces that he will be attending Deep South Homestead Gathering on March 21st in Perkinston, Mississippi, so be sure to stop by and see him.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about ball zucchini, treating cut potato pieces, and the recommend amount of 20-20-20 that is equivalent to 10-10-10. We currently have one variety of ball zucchini known as Eight Ball Squash which contains a darker green exterior with excellent texture and flavor profile. Greg mentions that in the past he has used fir bark dust as a fungicide on potato seed pieces, but he cannot see any difference from when he does and doesn't use it in the garden. Greg mentions when using 20-20-20 you would want to use half as much as you would 10-10-10 because it is twice the strength. However, if you are using a water-soluble liquid or granular form it can change the recommended amount.<br /> Product of the Week<br /> <br /> 338 Seed Starting Trays<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o048L65ufaQ Greg and Travis clean 41:57 Row by Row Episode 84: Garden Seeder vs. Seeder Attachment https://hosstools.com/garden-seeder-vs-seeder-attachment/ Wed, 15 Jan 2020 23:16:58 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=56799 Garden Seeder vs. Seeder Attachment The major difference that sets the seeder attachment apart from the garden seeder is it can attach to the Single Wheel Hoe and Double Wheel Hoe, while the garden seeder is a stand-alone unit that is used strictly for garden planting. However, both seeders have the same innovative seed plate design, hopper, and brush assembly. Having a customizable seed plate allows you to match your seed size and your desired seed spacing when planting in the vegetable garden. Garden Seeder The Hoss Garden Seeder is the most durable and versatile planter mechanism that ensures accurate planting in the vegetable garden. It contains a rolling disk as a furrow opener that rolls along the soil and leaves an opening for dropping a seed which makes it more forgiving in a wide variety of planting situations. This seeder is constructed with Amish-crafted hardwood handles and 15-inch steel wheels with a powder-coated steel frame that can last a lifetime. Seeder Attachment When it comes to planting with the Seeder Attachment it attaches to the wheel hoes to easily plant in the vegetable garden without wasting seed or over-planting along the rows. It contains a furrow opener that consists of a solid plate of metal known as the shoe that helps push through the soil and open it up when going along the garden rows. This seeder attachment is design to work in firmer, clay-like soils or non-tilled seedbeds. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Travis harvested some nice big Tehama Lettuce from the vegetable garden. He also shared some tips for what not to do when harvesting the different lettuce varieties. Currently, Greg has a test garden of onions where he has planted many different onion varieties to compare and contrast. When comparing the Warrior Bunching Onion and the Natsuguro Bunching Onion it seems that the Natsuguro variety has a little bigger bulb size than the Warrior variety. However, the Warrior variety seems to be more consistent in size compared to the Natsuguro variety. The guys also discuss several varieties such as English peas, Fordhook Lima Beans, and Savanna Mustard. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about planting in previous 10-foot walkways, growing under cover, planting sampler packs of potatoes, and determining pH in the soil. Travis mentions that normally if it was previously grass in the walkways, then it will grow back in the area. The guys also mention that they keep the walkways mowed in the garden as well. Travis highly recommends not adding wood chips to the walkways because they tend to make a mess and will require maintenance every day. Greg mentions that when growing under a hoop house it can be really beneficial if you live up North. However, we do not experience harsh cooler temperatures, so he recommends reading the Four-Season Harvest book by Eliot Coleman which can provide plenty of advice for growing up North. Travis mentions that we offer two sampler packs of potatoes which are the Homestead and Gourmet potato packs. He recommends a 30 to 40-foot row for planting a 10lb, sampler pack of potatoes. However, it's important to consider the different types of potato varieties and their maturity dates when planting in the vegetable garden. Greg explains the best way to determine the pH of your soil is by sending a soil sample off to a university that will in return send back a detailed report that tells you everything you need to know about your soil conditions. Product of the Week Lacy Phacelia https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W82zXCnJZLU Garden Seeder vs. Seeder Attachment The major difference that sets the seeder attachment apart from the garden seeder is it can attach to the Single Wheel Hoe and Double Wheel Hoe, while the garden seeder is a stand-alone unit that is used strictly fo... Garden Seeder vs. Seeder Attachment<br /> The major difference that sets the seeder attachment apart from the garden seeder is it can attach to the Single Wheel Hoe and Double Wheel Hoe, while the garden seeder is a stand-alone unit that is used strictly for garden planting. However, both seeders have the same innovative seed plate design, hopper, and brush assembly. Having a customizable seed plate allows you to match your seed size and your desired seed spacing when planting in the vegetable garden.<br /> Garden Seeder<br /> The Hoss Garden Seeder is the most durable and versatile planter mechanism that ensures accurate planting in the vegetable garden. It contains a rolling disk as a furrow opener that rolls along the soil and leaves an opening for dropping a seed which makes it more forgiving in a wide variety of planting situations. This seeder is constructed with Amish-crafted hardwood handles and 15-inch steel wheels with a powder-coated steel frame that can last a lifetime.<br /> Seeder Attachment<br /> When it comes to planting with the Seeder Attachment it attaches to the wheel hoes to easily plant in the vegetable garden without wasting seed or over-planting along the rows. It contains a furrow opener that consists of a solid plate of metal known as the shoe that helps push through the soil and open it up when going along the garden rows. This seeder attachment is design to work in firmer, clay-like soils or non-tilled seedbeds.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Travis harvested some nice big Tehama Lettuce from the vegetable garden. He also shared some tips for what not to do when harvesting the different lettuce varieties. Currently, Greg has a test garden of onions where he has planted many different onion varieties to compare and contrast. When comparing the Warrior Bunching Onion and the Natsuguro Bunching Onion it seems that the Natsuguro variety has a little bigger bulb size than the Warrior variety. However, the Warrior variety seems to be more consistent in size compared to the Natsuguro variety. The guys also discuss several varieties such as English peas, Fordhook Lima Beans, and Savanna Mustard.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about planting in previous 10-foot walkways, growing under cover, planting sampler packs of potatoes, and determining pH in the soil. Travis mentions that normally if it was previously grass in the walkways, then it will grow back in the area. The guys also mention that they keep the walkways mowed in the garden as well. Travis highly recommends not adding wood chips to the walkways because they tend to make a mess and will require maintenance every day. Greg mentions that when growing under a hoop house it can be really beneficial if you live up North. However, we do not experience harsh cooler temperatures, so he recommends reading the Four-Season Harvest book by Eliot Coleman which can provide plenty of advice for growing up North. Travis mentions that we offer two sampler packs of potatoes which are the Homestead and Gourmet potato packs. He recommends a 30 to 40-foot row for planting a 10lb, sampler pack of potatoes. However, it's important to consider the different types of potato varieties and their maturity dates when planting in the vegetable garden. Greg explains the best way to determine the pH of your soil is by sending a soil sample off to a university that will in return send back a detailed report that tells you everything you need to know about your soil conditions.<br /> Product of the Week<br /> <br /> Lacy Phacelia<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W82zXCnJZLU Greg and Travis clean 45:16 Row by Row Episode 83: New Year Resolutions for the Vegetable Garden! https://hosstools.com/new-year-resolutions-vegetable-garden/ Fri, 03 Jan 2020 22:35:03 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=56403 New Year Resolutions of 2019 Since it is officially a new year that means it is time to go over the 2019 resolutions and see what was achieved and what did not do well throughout this past year. One of Greg's 2019 resolutions was to do a better job maintaining soil health and use more cover crops in the garden. He mentions that he did a lot better with growing more cover crops and reduced his tillage drastically over this past year. However, Greg did not do well in adding in compost or chicken manure during pre-plant on a couple of occasions and he saw first hand how it impacted his vegetable garden compared to other gardens around his homestead. One of Travis's resolutions for 2019 was to create his dream vegetable garden which he did achieve on his homestead. Greg's second resolution for 2019 was to do better at succession planting which means being ready to plant the next crop once one crop is done maturing in the garden. He mentions that he has done extremely well with succession planting this past year and reminds gardeners of the importance of doing this succession planning throughout the growing seasons. When it comes to Travis growing more cover crops this past year, the cover crop that did extremely well for him during the warm season was the Sorghum Sudangrass and mowing it every couple of weeks. Another resolution that Travis had was to plant more multi-harvest crops and plant more winter squash in the spring. He mentions that he did plant more winter squash during the early stages of growth in his dream garden but they were not as productive as he hoped in the area. He also states that he did well with growing more multi-harvest crops, just wants to fine-tune it a little bit and stick to growing what crops work best for his soil type and weather conditions. New Year Resolutions for 2020 After going over their 2019 resolutions it is time for the guys to discuss their New Year Resolutions for 2020. The first resolution that Travis mentions is to eat more from the garden. Greg agrees with Travis and he wants to make a conscious effort to just eat vegetables a couple of nights a week instead of having meat at every meal. Travis's second resolution is to grow more beans especially the newer varieties in the vegetable garden. Greg's second new year resolution is to allow some garden area to rest and instead of growing vegetables, he is going to plant cover crops to add more benefits back into the soil. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Travis has a purple Cauliflower known as Graffiti which he demonstrates how he likes to cook it. He has also grown the biggest Snow Bowl Cauliflower ever in the garden weighing in at five and a half pounds. Greg has a dual purpose cover crop of mustard greens and daikon radish that has done extremely well in the vegetable garden. It's also that time of the year for all the winter crops to be mature and ready for harvest. Travis has harvested a huge Cheers Cabbage that weighed around seven and a half pounds from the garden. The guys discuss a couple of new seed varieties that they have started growing in the greenhouse as well. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about mustard gases in the soil, planting pumpkins, and recommend plants to start now in zone 8b. Travis mentions that the gases in mustard are converted to what is known as isothiocyanates which is a natural fungicide and natural nematicide which helps kill harmful funguses and nematodes when incorporated into the soil quickly. In the South, Greg mentions that the best time to plant pumpkins is within a week to two weeks after Easter and growing it off in the springtime. For zone 8b, Travis recommends planting cauliflower, broccoli, cabbage, beets, and lettuce. Product of the Week New 2020 Seed Varieties https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QPrITkp7eFc New Year Resolutions of 2019 Since it is officially a new year that means it is time to go over the 2019 resolutions and see what was achieved and what did not do well throughout this past year. One of Greg's 2019 resolutions was to do a better job ma... New Year Resolutions of 2019<br /> Since it is officially a new year that means it is time to go over the 2019 resolutions and see what was achieved and what did not do well throughout this past year. One of Greg's 2019 resolutions was to do a better job maintaining soil health and use more cover crops in the garden. He mentions that he did a lot better with growing more cover crops and reduced his tillage drastically over this past year. However, Greg did not do well in adding in compost or chicken manure during pre-plant on a couple of occasions and he saw first hand how it impacted his vegetable garden compared to other gardens around his homestead. One of Travis's resolutions for 2019 was to create his dream vegetable garden which he did achieve on his homestead. Greg's second resolution for 2019 was to do better at succession planting which means being ready to plant the next crop once one crop is done maturing in the garden. He mentions that he has done extremely well with succession planting this past year and reminds gardeners of the importance of doing this succession planning throughout the growing seasons. When it comes to Travis growing more cover crops this past year, the cover crop that did extremely well for him during the warm season was the Sorghum Sudangrass and mowing it every couple of weeks. Another resolution that Travis had was to plant more multi-harvest crops and plant more winter squash in the spring. He mentions that he did plant more winter squash during the early stages of growth in his dream garden but they were not as productive as he hoped in the area. He also states that he did well with growing more multi-harvest crops, just wants to fine-tune it a little bit and stick to growing what crops work best for his soil type and weather conditions.<br /> New Year Resolutions for 2020<br /> After going over their 2019 resolutions it is time for the guys to discuss their New Year Resolutions for 2020. The first resolution that Travis mentions is to eat more from the garden. Greg agrees with Travis and he wants to make a conscious effort to just eat vegetables a couple of nights a week instead of having meat at every meal. Travis's second resolution is to grow more beans especially the newer varieties in the vegetable garden. Greg's second new year resolution is to allow some garden area to rest and instead of growing vegetables, he is going to plant cover crops to add more benefits back into the soil.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Travis has a purple Cauliflower known as Graffiti which he demonstrates how he likes to cook it. He has also grown the biggest Snow Bowl Cauliflower ever in the garden weighing in at five and a half pounds. Greg has a dual purpose cover crop of mustard greens and daikon radish that has done extremely well in the vegetable garden. It's also that time of the year for all the winter crops to be mature and ready for harvest. Travis has harvested a huge Cheers Cabbage that weighed around seven and a half pounds from the garden. The guys discuss a couple of new seed varieties that they have started growing in the greenhouse as well.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about mustard gases in the soil, planting pumpkins, and recommend plants to start now in zone 8b. Travis mentions that the gases in mustard are converted to what is known as isothiocyanates which is a natural fungicide and natural nematicide which helps kill harmful funguses and nematodes when incorporated into the soil quickly. In the South, Greg mentions that the best time to plant pumpkins is within a week to two weeks after Easter and growing it off in the springtime. For zone 8b, Travis recommends planting cauliflower, broccoli, cabbage, beets, and lettuce.<br /> Product of the Week<br /> <br /> New 2020 Seed Varieties<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QPrITkp7eFc Greg and Travis clean 34:12 Row by Row Episode 82: Top Vegetables That Do Best in Cool Weather https://hosstools.com/top-vegetables-best-cool-weather/ Sat, 21 Dec 2019 01:23:51 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=55974 New Seed Varieties for Cool Weather The guys discuss a few of their favorite seed vegetables that do best in the cool weather conditions. Some of these new seed varieties include tomatoes, winter squash, watermelon, broccoli, and cauliflower. The first new seed variety Travis mentions is the Red Snapper Tomato that is resistant to the spotted wilt virus and the tomato yellow leaf curl virus which both cause very dangerous issues in the vegetable garden. In the South, if you have failed at growing tomatoes in the past, you definitely need to try a virus-resistant tomato variety instead. The second new tomato seed is known as Tachi which is another spotted wilt virus-resistant variety, but also a nematode-resistant variety. Next, Greg talks about the Sugar Baby Watermelon which is an older variety that produces smaller personal sized watermelons. The fourth cool weather vegetable mentioned is a winter squash known as the Sweet Dumpling variety. This variety is the top of the line when it comes to flavor profile in winter squash. Another excellent broccoli variety is the Emerald Crown which is a hybrid that is grown more during the cool weather season. The fifth top cool weather vegetable is the Godzilla Broccolli variety that grows large heads at the top of the plant, making it easier to harvest. Next, is a traditional Early Crookneck Squash variety that has been around forever that produces golden-yellow fruits in the garden. Then, we have a new Twister Cauliflower variety available that produces upper leaves that actually twist and wrap around the plant to protect the cauliflower throughout the growing season. The guys explain a little tip about growing beans and talk about the new Gold Wax Bean, Royal Burgundy, Scarlet Emperor, and White Emergo varieties. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Travis has all kinds of vegetables maturing in the garden. He has a Matejko Leek variety that had a few problems when it came to planting them deep enough in the soil. Greg and Travis show off a variety of beets, rutabagas, and Feng Qing cabbage. The guys also discuss a few varieties that will become available in the next year. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about a squash variety known as North Georgia Candy Rooster, where to get a Kohlrabi slicer, the spacing of pole beans on a trellis, seed longevity, fertility storage, and green magic broccoli heads. Travis mentions that they do not currently carry North Georgia Candy Rooster because it has been difficult to find a seed producer that has them, but he will continue to look until he finds some. Greg has had his Kohlrabi slicer for years, his particular brand is known as a King Kutter. Travis mentions that when planting pole beans vertically he likes to plant them tight such as 3 inches apart and on a double row. However, this planting method will take a little longer to harvest because of the dense foliage, the reward will be getting maximum productivity of pole beans. Greg explains that proper seed storage is to place them in an area where temperatures remain the same this ensures that they will remain stable. When it comes to fertilizer storage, as long as it does not get heavy amounts of moisture that cause it to start melting it should be fine. If the fertilizer starts to melt and get mushy, then it should be discarded. Travis has harvested some Green Magic Broccoli that produced heads weighing about a pound on average. Product of the Week Premium Garden Seeds https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DSLTT7939Tw New Seed Varieties for Cool Weather The guys discuss a few of their favorite seed vegetables that do best in the cool weather conditions. Some of these new seed varieties include tomatoes, winter squash, watermelon, broccoli, and cauliflower. New Seed Varieties for Cool Weather<br /> The guys discuss a few of their favorite seed vegetables that do best in the cool weather conditions. Some of these new seed varieties include tomatoes, winter squash, watermelon, broccoli, and cauliflower. The first new seed variety Travis mentions is the Red Snapper Tomato that is resistant to the spotted wilt virus and the tomato yellow leaf curl virus which both cause very dangerous issues in the vegetable garden. In the South, if you have failed at growing tomatoes in the past, you definitely need to try a virus-resistant tomato variety instead. The second new tomato seed is known as Tachi which is another spotted wilt virus-resistant variety, but also a nematode-resistant variety. Next, Greg talks about the Sugar Baby Watermelon which is an older variety that produces smaller personal sized watermelons. The fourth cool weather vegetable mentioned is a winter squash known as the Sweet Dumpling variety. This variety is the top of the line when it comes to flavor profile in winter squash. Another excellent broccoli variety is the Emerald Crown which is a hybrid that is grown more during the cool weather season. The fifth top cool weather vegetable is the Godzilla Broccolli variety that grows large heads at the top of the plant, making it easier to harvest. Next, is a traditional Early Crookneck Squash variety that has been around forever that produces golden-yellow fruits in the garden. Then, we have a new Twister Cauliflower variety available that produces upper leaves that actually twist and wrap around the plant to protect the cauliflower throughout the growing season. The guys explain a little tip about growing beans and talk about the new Gold Wax Bean, Royal Burgundy, Scarlet Emperor, and White Emergo varieties.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Travis has all kinds of vegetables maturing in the garden. He has a Matejko Leek variety that had a few problems when it came to planting them deep enough in the soil. Greg and Travis show off a variety of beets, rutabagas, and Feng Qing cabbage. The guys also discuss a few varieties that will become available in the next year.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about a squash variety known as North Georgia Candy Rooster, where to get a Kohlrabi slicer, the spacing of pole beans on a trellis, seed longevity, fertility storage, and green magic broccoli heads. Travis mentions that they do not currently carry North Georgia Candy Rooster because it has been difficult to find a seed producer that has them, but he will continue to look until he finds some. Greg has had his Kohlrabi slicer for years, his particular brand is known as a King Kutter. Travis mentions that when planting pole beans vertically he likes to plant them tight such as 3 inches apart and on a double row. However, this planting method will take a little longer to harvest because of the dense foliage, the reward will be getting maximum productivity of pole beans. Greg explains that proper seed storage is to place them in an area where temperatures remain the same this ensures that they will remain stable. When it comes to fertilizer storage, as long as it does not get heavy amounts of moisture that cause it to start melting it should be fine. If the fertilizer starts to melt and get mushy, then it should be discarded. Travis has harvested some Green Magic Broccoli that produced heads weighing about a pound on average.<br /> Product of the Week<br /> <br /> Premium Garden Seeds<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DSLTT7939Tw Greg and Travis clean 46:07 Row by Row Episode 81: The Top Ten Gift Ideas for All Types of Gardeners https://hosstools.com/top-ten-gift-ideas-gardeners/ Fri, 13 Dec 2019 21:36:42 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=55661 Top Ten Gift Ideas: These gift ideas are the ideal perfect gifts for all types of gardeners whether you are a beginner or advanced vegetable gardener. As well as, they all are reasonably priced under $100, made in the USA, and quality products that will last you a lifetime. 1. Hoe Dag Tool Kit This tool kit has everything you need to plant, weed, and cultivate your raised garden beds. The Hoe Dag Tool Kit includes a hoe dag, hand shovel, and hand rank that are all made with high carbon steel blades. Each tool has a riveted-socket design that attaches the implement to the handle to ensure it will remain attached through the toughest soil debris. 2. Seed Collections There are three different themed seed collections that are excellent gift ideas that we have available which are the Pollinator Garden Collection, Heirloom Garden Collection, Fresh Salad Garden Collection, and Cool Season Garden Collection. With each collection, you get a variety of seeds that are all perfect for growing throughout the vegetable garden. 3. Garden Fertilizer Another gift that you wouldn't ever think about giving is 20-20-20 garden fertilizer. However, anybody, that loves to grow a garden would need this fertilizer in their next growing season. It has a balanced ratio of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium that is great for fertilizing plants at all growing stages in the garden. 4. Complete Fermentation Kit If you are shopping for someone that loves to preserve food from the vegetable garden the Complete Fermentation Kit is the perfect gift. This kit includes a pickle packer jar tamper, pickle pipe fermentation lids, pickle pebble fermentation weights, and an instructional booklet which is everything you need to start fermenting vegetables expect the jar. 5. Small Garden Tool Kit Another great set of tools is our Small Garden Toolkit which contains three of our most popular hand-made tools for maintaining your garden bed. This kit comes with a garden trowel, crows foot cultivator, and batwing hoe that ensures you get maximum planting in the soil of your raised garden bed. 6. Micro-Boost A product that has received multiple good reviews from customers is our Micro-Boost. It contains all the micronutrients that the plant could possibly need to grow throughout the season. It also works great in our EZ-Flo Injector to accurately fertilizer where plants need to uptake the most. 7. Harvesting Bucket A long-time product of ours that has been an all-time favorite is our Over-the-Shoulder Harvesting Bucket. This garden tool is ideal for harvesting all types of vegetables such as tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, okra, etc. Even fruit varieties such as apples, muscadines, figs, and berries. 8. Garden Gloves The most comfortable gloves around is our Hoss Garden Gloves. For working all around the homestead these garden gloves remain durable and allow for maximum dexterity no matter what job you are doing. Some of the features it contains is padded palm cushion, stretchy nylon material, and extra reinforcement on fingertips for more durability. 9. Garden Hod Another product that has been around for a long time that has been a favorite by many is our Garden Hod. This is a multifunctional harvesting bucket that allows you to harvest your vegetables and simply rinse them off all in the same container. 10. Pruning Shears Our pruning shears have a lifetime warranty that contains a heavy-duty Savoy steel blade that provides the most high-quality pruners. The blades are very tough and are guaranteed to hold an edge that will last better than other shears at your local hardware store. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Greg and Travis show different ways to prepare and cook the strange-looking vegetable known as Kohlrabi. Greg has grown kohlrabi for around 5 to 6 years and loves to grow it because it is insect resistant, easy to grow, and quick to mature in the garden. When growing kohlrabi it has roots that grow right above the groun... Top Ten Gift Ideas: These gift ideas are the ideal perfect gifts for all types of gardeners whether you are a beginner or advanced vegetable gardener. As well as, they all are reasonably priced under $100, made in the USA, Top Ten Gift Ideas:<br /> These gift ideas are the ideal perfect gifts for all types of gardeners whether you are a beginner or advanced vegetable gardener. As well as, they all are reasonably priced under $100, made in the USA, and quality products that will last you a lifetime.<br /> 1. Hoe Dag Tool Kit<br /> This tool kit has everything you need to plant, weed, and cultivate your raised garden beds. The Hoe Dag Tool Kit includes a hoe dag, hand shovel, and hand rank that are all made with high carbon steel blades. Each tool has a riveted-socket design that attaches the implement to the handle to ensure it will remain attached through the toughest soil debris.<br /> 2. Seed Collections<br /> There are three different themed seed collections that are excellent gift ideas that we have available which are the Pollinator Garden Collection, Heirloom Garden Collection, Fresh Salad Garden Collection, and Cool Season Garden Collection. With each collection, you get a variety of seeds that are all perfect for growing throughout the vegetable garden.<br /> 3. Garden Fertilizer<br /> Another gift that you wouldn't ever think about giving is 20-20-20 garden fertilizer. However, anybody, that loves to grow a garden would need this fertilizer in their next growing season. It has a balanced ratio of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium that is great for fertilizing plants at all growing stages in the garden.<br /> 4. Complete Fermentation Kit<br /> If you are shopping for someone that loves to preserve food from the vegetable garden the Complete Fermentation Kit is the perfect gift. This kit includes a pickle packer jar tamper, pickle pipe fermentation lids, pickle pebble fermentation weights, and an instructional booklet which is everything you need to start fermenting vegetables expect the jar.<br /> 5. Small Garden Tool Kit<br /> Another great set of tools is our Small Garden Toolkit which contains three of our most popular hand-made tools for maintaining your garden bed. This kit comes with a garden trowel, crows foot cultivator, and batwing hoe that ensures you get maximum planting in the soil of your raised garden bed.<br /> 6. Micro-Boost<br /> A product that has received multiple good reviews from customers is our Micro-Boost. It contains all the micronutrients that the plant could possibly need to grow throughout the season. It also works great in our EZ-Flo Injector to accurately fertilizer where plants need to uptake the most.<br /> 7. Harvesting Bucket<br /> A long-time product of ours that has been an all-time favorite is our Over-the-Shoulder Harvesting Bucket. This garden tool is ideal for harvesting all types of vegetables such as tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, okra, etc. Even fruit varieties such as apples, muscadines, figs, and berries.<br /> 8. Garden Gloves<br /> The most comfortable gloves around is our Hoss Garden Gloves. For working all around the homestead these garden gloves remain durable and allow for maximum dexterity no matter what job you are doing. Some of the features it contains is padded palm cushion, stretchy nylon material, and extra reinforcement on fingertips for more durability.<br /> 9. Garden Hod<br /> Another product that has been around for a long time that has been a favorite by many is our Garden Hod. This is a multifunctional harvesting bucket that allows you to harvest your vegetables and simply rinse them off all in the same container.<br /> 10. Pruning Shears<br /> Our pruning shears have a lifetime warranty that contains a heavy-duty Savoy steel blade that provides the most high-quality pruners. The blades are very tough and are guaranteed to hold an edge that will last better than other shears at your local hardware store.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Greg and Travis show different ways to prepare and cook the strange-looking vegetable known as Kohlrabi. Greg has grown kohlrabi for around 5 to 6 years and loves to grow it because i... Greg and Travis clean 38:39 Row by Row Episode 80: Growing Your Own Transplants for the Garden https://hosstools.com/growing-transplants-garden/ Mon, 09 Dec 2019 20:31:30 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=55335 Growing Your Own Transplants The major benefit of growing your own transplants is you are able to get a jumpstart on the growing season. This means you will have plants ready to go in the ground as soon as the weather conditions and soil temperatures are just right in the vegetable garden. Another benefit is you are able to grow a wider variety of vegetables because you aren't limited to just the plants that are at the big box stores. Growing your own transplants can also be a much more affordable solution in the long run because you aren't buying new plants from the store every growing season and hoping they make it once you establish them in your personal vegetable garden. New Seeding Starting Kits With the three new seed starting kits, the main difference is the size and overall components of each. The first seed starting kit that the guys discuss is the 24-Cell Seed Starting Kit. This kit includes two 12-cell trays, bottom trays, domes, pro-mix seed starting mix, complete organic fertilizer, and garden labels. With two 12-cell trays, you can grow up to 24 plants of any kind of vegetables. Next, is the 48-Cell Seed Starting Kit, which is basically double what you get with the 24-cell kit. The 48-cell kit includes two 24-cell trays, bottom trays, domes, two bags of pro-mix seed starting mix, two bags of complete organic fertilizer, and garden labels. The last new kit they discuss is the Deluxe Seed Starting Kit which includes two 24-cell trays, larger bottom tray, dome, 16-quart pro-mix seed starting, and the garden labels. They also discuss the Premium Seed Starting Kit which has been out for a while but is the ultimate seed starting kit to grow the most vegetable transplants. The Premium kit includes our 162-cell tray, the heavy-duty bottom tray, pro-mix seed starting mix, a Dramm rain wand, garden labels, and four premium garden seeds such as Arcadia Broccoli, Tiger Collard, Parris Island Romaine Lettuce, and Lacinato Kale. Depending on how many vegetables you want to grow and need that can help determine which seed starting kit would be the best fit for you. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Travis and Greg have several different fig varieties to show, discuss, and taste test. They give a small update on the new studio and adjustments that are continuing to be made. Greg talks about what plants are quickly growing in his vegetable gardens such as collards, onions, Brussel sprouts, and mustard greens. The guys also discuss the two common mistakes that people make in the fall and winter garden which includes not watering plants and adding enough fertilizer to the plants. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about wearing sunglasses on the video last week and their opinions on adding charcoal or biochar to the garden. Travis mentions that he does apologize for wearing his sunglasses in last week's video it is just a healthy precaution to protect his eyes from the new studio lights. Greg mentions that biochar is a carbon product that makes this charred organic matter that looks like ground-up charcoal. It has been primarily used to help take away contaminants such as pesticides from the garden soil. If you are experiencing contaminated soil then biochar is the best option. Another factor of using biochar is it can be used as a sponge to basically hold nutrients in the soil. However, Greg believes that adding good quality compost is a more economical way of adding nutrients to the soil. Products of the Week Seed Starting Supplies https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h5p4JNf4JVw Growing Your Own Transplants The major benefit of growing your own transplants is you are able to get a jumpstart on the growing season. This means you will have plants ready to go in the ground as soon as the weather conditions and soil temperatures ... Growing Your Own Transplants<br /> The major benefit of growing your own transplants is you are able to get a jumpstart on the growing season. This means you will have plants ready to go in the ground as soon as the weather conditions and soil temperatures are just right in the vegetable garden. Another benefit is you are able to grow a wider variety of vegetables because you aren't limited to just the plants that are at the big box stores. Growing your own transplants can also be a much more affordable solution in the long run because you aren't buying new plants from the store every growing season and hoping they make it once you establish them in your personal vegetable garden.<br /> New Seeding Starting Kits<br /> With the three new seed starting kits, the main difference is the size and overall components of each. The first seed starting kit that the guys discuss is the 24-Cell Seed Starting Kit. This kit includes two 12-cell trays, bottom trays, domes, pro-mix seed starting mix, complete organic fertilizer, and garden labels. With two 12-cell trays, you can grow up to 24 plants of any kind of vegetables. Next, is the 48-Cell Seed Starting Kit, which is basically double what you get with the 24-cell kit. The 48-cell kit includes two 24-cell trays, bottom trays, domes, two bags of pro-mix seed starting mix, two bags of complete organic fertilizer, and garden labels. The last new kit they discuss is the Deluxe Seed Starting Kit which includes two 24-cell trays, larger bottom tray, dome, 16-quart pro-mix seed starting, and the garden labels. They also discuss the Premium Seed Starting Kit which has been out for a while but is the ultimate seed starting kit to grow the most vegetable transplants. The Premium kit includes our 162-cell tray, the heavy-duty bottom tray, pro-mix seed starting mix, a Dramm rain wand, garden labels, and four premium garden seeds such as Arcadia Broccoli, Tiger Collard, Parris Island Romaine Lettuce, and Lacinato Kale. Depending on how many vegetables you want to grow and need that can help determine which seed starting kit would be the best fit for you.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Travis and Greg have several different fig varieties to show, discuss, and taste test. They give a small update on the new studio and adjustments that are continuing to be made. Greg talks about what plants are quickly growing in his vegetable gardens such as collards, onions, Brussel sprouts, and mustard greens. The guys also discuss the two common mistakes that people make in the fall and winter garden which includes not watering plants and adding enough fertilizer to the plants.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about wearing sunglasses on the video last week and their opinions on adding charcoal or biochar to the garden. Travis mentions that he does apologize for wearing his sunglasses in last week's video it is just a healthy precaution to protect his eyes from the new studio lights. Greg mentions that biochar is a carbon product that makes this charred organic matter that looks like ground-up charcoal. It has been primarily used to help take away contaminants such as pesticides from the garden soil. If you are experiencing contaminated soil then biochar is the best option. Another factor of using biochar is it can be used as a sponge to basically hold nutrients in the soil. However, Greg believes that adding good quality compost is a more economical way of adding nutrients to the soil.<br /> Products of the Week<br /> <br /> Seed Starting Supplies<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h5p4JNf4JVw Greg and Travis clean 37:06 Row by Row Episode 79: Which One is Better – Single, Double, or High Arch Wheel Hoe? https://hosstools.com/single-double-high-arch-wheel-hoe/ Mon, 25 Nov 2019 19:14:04 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=54862 Wheel Hoe Comparisons This week, Greg and Travis discuss a popular question they get from customers that are wanting to buy a wheel hoe but don't know which one to choose. When comparing the Single and Double Wheel Hoe the main comparison is the toolbar is identical on both models. However, on the Double, the arms are flipped and it has a longer axle with an extra wheel. With these two models, you can convert from Double to Single and Single to Double because all the components are the same. While the High Arch is a completely different piece of equipment compared to the Single and Double. That being said you cannot convert the Single and Double to the High Arch and vice versa. Single Wheel Hoe The first model that we made available was the Single Wheel Hoe, which was based on the old Planet Jr. Wheel Hoes that have been around for over 100 years. If you're a beginner gardener and have a small garden that's around 30x40 or 30x50 in size, the Single is the perfect tool for you. It also comes with a set of three cultivator teeth that can be moved around the toolbar and up to five teeth can be used at once. With cool weather crops like lettuce, the Single Wheel Hoe allows for a narrower footprint when planting in the garden. Double Wheel Hoe There are a couple of advantages when it comes to choosing the Double Wheel Hoe over the Single Wheel Hoe. The first advantage is you are able to straddle smaller plants between the two wheels. This works great for planting potatoes because you are able to straddle the seed potatoes and cover them up using the plow set in the hilling position. Another big advantage of the Double is every attachment that we carry at Hoss Tools works on this Wheel Hoe. High Arch Wheel Hoe Similar in concept to the Double, the High Arch Wheel Hoe allows you to straddle plants as well, but much taller plants like corn and potatoes. It also contains adjustable wheel spacing meaning the wheels can move in or out depending on your desired spacing in the garden. So basically you have three different settings on the wheel spacing which includes the innermost being 4 inches apart, the middle being 6 inches apart, and the farthest being 8 inches apart. Another difference is the High Arch has two toolbars instead of just one, which provides many more possibilities for planting within the garden. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Greg and Travis introduce the brand new studio for the Row by Row Garden Show. The guy's show off the new bottom trays that fit our 162 cell seed starting trays for growing better transplants indoors. Travis has some Lacinato Kale that he harvested from the vegetable garden. They also discuss different varieties of figs and flavor profiles of each type. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about extending carrot life after harvest, tips for growing giant pumpkins, and direct sowing in the winter after harvest. Travis mentions when harvesting carrots, he normally either pulls them with the tops on them or pulls them and twist off the tops. Then, he rinses them off, lets them naturally dry off, and places them in a grocery bag to put in the refrigerator. Greg has some experience trying to grow giant pumpkins in the past. Greg created a little teepee to keep the sun off of them but the pumpkins ended up not doing well and exploding on him. However, Greg has some advice that he learned from his failure at growing giant pumpkins which includes applying drip irrigation, spoon feed them fertilizer, shade them out, and watch your downy and powdery mildew. Travis mentions that when direct sowing in the winter the best vegetables to grow include turnips, radishes, mustard, and spinach. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kOl7jZj5QEo Wheel Hoe Comparisons This week, Greg and Travis discuss a popular question they get from customers that are wanting to buy a wheel hoe but don't know which one to choose. When comparing the Single and Double Wheel Hoe the main comparison is the toolb... Wheel Hoe Comparisons<br /> This week, Greg and Travis discuss a popular question they get from customers that are wanting to buy a wheel hoe but don't know which one to choose. When comparing the Single and Double Wheel Hoe the main comparison is the toolbar is identical on both models. However, on the Double, the arms are flipped and it has a longer axle with an extra wheel. With these two models, you can convert from Double to Single and Single to Double because all the components are the same. While the High Arch is a completely different piece of equipment compared to the Single and Double. That being said you cannot convert the Single and Double to the High Arch and vice versa.<br /> Single Wheel Hoe<br /> The first model that we made available was the Single Wheel Hoe, which was based on the old Planet Jr. Wheel Hoes that have been around for over 100 years. If you're a beginner gardener and have a small garden that's around 30x40 or 30x50 in size, the Single is the perfect tool for you. It also comes with a set of three cultivator teeth that can be moved around the toolbar and up to five teeth can be used at once. With cool weather crops like lettuce, the Single Wheel Hoe allows for a narrower footprint when planting in the garden.<br /> Double Wheel Hoe<br /> There are a couple of advantages when it comes to choosing the Double Wheel Hoe over the Single Wheel Hoe. The first advantage is you are able to straddle smaller plants between the two wheels. This works great for planting potatoes because you are able to straddle the seed potatoes and cover them up using the plow set in the hilling position. Another big advantage of the Double is every attachment that we carry at Hoss Tools works on this Wheel Hoe.<br /> High Arch Wheel Hoe<br /> Similar in concept to the Double, the High Arch Wheel Hoe allows you to straddle plants as well, but much taller plants like corn and potatoes. It also contains adjustable wheel spacing meaning the wheels can move in or out depending on your desired spacing in the garden. So basically you have three different settings on the wheel spacing which includes the innermost being 4 inches apart, the middle being 6 inches apart, and the farthest being 8 inches apart. Another difference is the High Arch has two toolbars instead of just one, which provides many more possibilities for planting within the garden.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Greg and Travis introduce the brand new studio for the Row by Row Garden Show. The guy's show off the new bottom trays that fit our 162 cell seed starting trays for growing better transplants indoors. Travis has some Lacinato Kale that he harvested from the vegetable garden. They also discuss different varieties of figs and flavor profiles of each type.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about extending carrot life after harvest, tips for growing giant pumpkins, and direct sowing in the winter after harvest. Travis mentions when harvesting carrots, he normally either pulls them with the tops on them or pulls them and twist off the tops. Then, he rinses them off, lets them naturally dry off, and places them in a grocery bag to put in the refrigerator. Greg has some experience trying to grow giant pumpkins in the past. Greg created a little teepee to keep the sun off of them but the pumpkins ended up not doing well and exploding on him. However, Greg has some advice that he learned from his failure at growing giant pumpkins which includes applying drip irrigation, spoon feed them fertilizer, shade them out, and watch your downy and powdery mildew. Travis mentions that when direct sowing in the winter the best vegetables to grow include turnips, radishes, mustard, and spinach.<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kOl7jZj5QEo Greg and Travis clean 36:34 Row by Row Episode 78: A Little Homesteading with Cog Hill Farm https://hosstools.com/homesteading-cog-hill-farm/ Mon, 18 Nov 2019 19:49:58 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=54696 Cog Hill Farm Traveling around Salem and Valley Grand, Alabama, Travis recently stopped by to see his good buddy Jason at Cog Hill Farm. Travis and Jason talk a little bit about his philosophy on homesteading and gardening. Jason began his homesteading on his current property around 14 to 15 years ago and the gardening just evolved from there. He now has livestock such as chickens, goats, geese, and even a peacock. However, his favorite homesteading activity is gardening because that's how it all began for him personally. When talking about the garden, one of Jason's favorite crops to grow at Cog Hill Farm it would probably be everybody's favorite crop which is tomatoes. Jason gave some advice for people potentially wanting to start a homesteading lifestyle that includes gardening and livestock. His biggest piece of advice is not to be scared and don't be scared of making mistakes. A lot of times when people are getting started in gardening, sometimes they are influenced by experienced gardeners to do everything a certain way. However, at the end of the day, everyone's gardening style is a little different and you should do the best you can with the resources you have available for your own vegetable garden. Jason's two favorite products that have really helped him out this past year within the garden was the Wheel Hoe with the plow set and winged sweeps attachment. He has seen a significant decrease in his weed pressures since using both of these attachments in the garden. When discussing a little bit about Jason's future plans for Cog Hill Farm, he hopes to expand his garden area and even dive into a little bit of market gardening within his community. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Travis has some Blue Knight Kale which is an improved variety of the curly leaf kale type. This is a productive variety that works great for making a kale salad in the kitchen. The guys discuss the cold weather and some vegetables that may not make it because of the weather conditions this year. If you have drip irrigation, make sure to keep the soil nice and moist to insulate the garden soil during cold spells. They also have around 15 different varieties of figs rooting in the greenhouse and we will be coming soon to the site. The guys also mention that the new studio is coming along and hopefully will be ready to show off in next week's video. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about the flavor profile of onions, growing onions from seeds, and Greg's cornbread recipe. Greg currently has multiplying onions, bunching onions, and regular onions all growing in the garden and will be doing a taste test later on to determine the differences of each. Travis mentions when growing onions and leeks, you can either transplant seeds or buy plants. However, you can do either it's just all based around timing. For example, growing leeks in the ground takes a longer time than it does in the seed starting trays. When it comes to shallots you can plant them from seed, sets, or from plants. Greg mentions that the ideal way to grow onions, shallots, and leeks is in the seed starting trays or raised bed garden. When discussing he mentions that he always uses his cast-iron cornbread griddle to cook cornbread. However, he is still in the process of trying to perfect his cornbread recipe, but as soon as it does he will share it with everyone. Products of the Week Heavy-Duty Bottom Trays https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jMz6PQMMJpo Cog Hill Farm Traveling around Salem and Valley Grand, Alabama, Travis recently stopped by to see his good buddy Jason at Cog Hill Farm. Travis and Jason talk a little bit about his philosophy on homesteading and gardening. Cog Hill Farm<br /> Traveling around Salem and Valley Grand, Alabama, Travis recently stopped by to see his good buddy Jason at Cog Hill Farm. Travis and Jason talk a little bit about his philosophy on homesteading and gardening. Jason began his homesteading on his current property around 14 to 15 years ago and the gardening just evolved from there. He now has livestock such as chickens, goats, geese, and even a peacock. However, his favorite homesteading activity is gardening because that's how it all began for him personally. When talking about the garden, one of Jason's favorite crops to grow at Cog Hill Farm it would probably be everybody's favorite crop which is tomatoes. Jason gave some advice for people potentially wanting to start a homesteading lifestyle that includes gardening and livestock. His biggest piece of advice is not to be scared and don't be scared of making mistakes. A lot of times when people are getting started in gardening, sometimes they are influenced by experienced gardeners to do everything a certain way. However, at the end of the day, everyone's gardening style is a little different and you should do the best you can with the resources you have available for your own vegetable garden. Jason's two favorite products that have really helped him out this past year within the garden was the Wheel Hoe with the plow set and winged sweeps attachment. He has seen a significant decrease in his weed pressures since using both of these attachments in the garden. When discussing a little bit about Jason's future plans for Cog Hill Farm, he hopes to expand his garden area and even dive into a little bit of market gardening within his community.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Travis has some Blue Knight Kale which is an improved variety of the curly leaf kale type. This is a productive variety that works great for making a kale salad in the kitchen. The guys discuss the cold weather and some vegetables that may not make it because of the weather conditions this year. If you have drip irrigation, make sure to keep the soil nice and moist to insulate the garden soil during cold spells. They also have around 15 different varieties of figs rooting in the greenhouse and we will be coming soon to the site. The guys also mention that the new studio is coming along and hopefully will be ready to show off in next week's video.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about the flavor profile of onions, growing onions from seeds, and Greg's cornbread recipe. Greg currently has multiplying onions, bunching onions, and regular onions all growing in the garden and will be doing a taste test later on to determine the differences of each. Travis mentions when growing onions and leeks, you can either transplant seeds or buy plants. However, you can do either it's just all based around timing. For example, growing leeks in the ground takes a longer time than it does in the seed starting trays. When it comes to shallots you can plant them from seed, sets, or from plants. Greg mentions that the ideal way to grow onions, shallots, and leeks is in the seed starting trays or raised bed garden. When discussing he mentions that he always uses his cast-iron cornbread griddle to cook cornbread. However, he is still in the process of trying to perfect his cornbread recipe, but as soon as it does he will share it with everyone.<br /> Products of the Week<br /> <br /> Heavy-Duty Bottom Trays<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jMz6PQMMJpo Greg and Travis clean 39:52 Row by Row Episode 75: The Best Raised Bed Garden Tools to Have! https://hosstools.com/best-raised-bed-garden-tools/ Mon, 28 Oct 2019 18:49:40 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=54241 Best Raised Bed Garden Tools When planting in a raised garden bed you can tools that allow you to get a little closer to the plants. The first tool the guys discuss is the short single tine cultivator. This garden tool allows you to rake across the weeds and get in between the drip tape in the vegetable garden. Travis mentions that the single tine cultivator works great for making mini furrows to prepare for planting in raised beds. The next best-raised bed garden tool is the garden trowel. It contains a high carbon steel blade with a hand-welded shank and hickory handle. The Crows Foot Cultivator is the perfect tool for amending and preparing the garden soil for planting. The steel tines allow you to break up the hardest soils to prepare them for future planting in the raised bed. While the Small Batwing Hoe is best for pulling up soil on to plants or covering planted seeds. The next tool is the Cape Cod Weeder which is designed to skim across the soil and you can basically control the depth at which it digs into the soil. It is also handy for weeding up close to plants that way you don't have to worry about damaging the plants. Another quality short handle gardening tool is the Scuffle Weeder which works great for shallow weeding to remove the small surface weeds that come up in the garden. Then, we have the Digging Tool which is great for breaking up soil in the raised bed or even pots and containers in the greenhouse this is a handy tool to use for gardening. The Small Section Hoe is another handy tool with a triangular-shaped blade that allows you to make little furrows for planting in raised beds. Then, an all-around general tool that is great to have for lightweight and heavyduty planting is the Hoe Dag. It is another high carbon steel tool that contains a sharp edge on both sides. Another great quality about all of these tools is they are made in the USA and have a guaranteed warranty. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Travis and Greg got an unexpected jumpstart in the garden. Travis went ahead and planted some onions in October that needed to be put in the ground. While Greg went ahead and planted some nesting onions, elephant garlic, and shallots in the garden. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about storging turnip greens and the difference between insecticidal soap vs. horticultural oil. Travis goes into Mrs. Hoss's raised bed garden to demonstrate how to pick and store some Tiger collards. He begins by picking a hand full of collard leaves off the bottom of the plant. Then, trims the stems and places them in a bag kind of similar to the produce bags at your supermarkets. Next, tie a knot at the top of the bag, poke some holes for airflow, and they will store away in the fridge for at least a couple of weeks. Greg mentions that the difference between insecticidal soap and horticultural oil is that the oils are heavier and work better on a wider array of insects in the garden. However, the oils do have issues when used in the hot weather conditions whereas the soaps do way better in these certain conditions. So the key take away is to use horticultural oil during the cooler weather months and insecticidal soap during the hot weather months in the garden. Products of the Week All Top Turnips https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OPftlVqCLgM Best Raised Bed Garden Tools When planting in a raised garden bed you can tools that allow you to get a little closer to the plants. The first tool the guys discuss is the short single tine cultivator. This garden tool allows you to rake across the we... Best Raised Bed Garden Tools<br /> When planting in a raised garden bed you can tools that allow you to get a little closer to the plants. The first tool the guys discuss is the short single tine cultivator. This garden tool allows you to rake across the weeds and get in between the drip tape in the vegetable garden. Travis mentions that the single tine cultivator works great for making mini furrows to prepare for planting in raised beds. The next best-raised bed garden tool is the garden trowel. It contains a high carbon steel blade with a hand-welded shank and hickory handle. The Crows Foot Cultivator is the perfect tool for amending and preparing the garden soil for planting. The steel tines allow you to break up the hardest soils to prepare them for future planting in the raised bed. While the Small Batwing Hoe is best for pulling up soil on to plants or covering planted seeds. The next tool is the Cape Cod Weeder which is designed to skim across the soil and you can basically control the depth at which it digs into the soil. It is also handy for weeding up close to plants that way you don't have to worry about damaging the plants. Another quality short handle gardening tool is the Scuffle Weeder which works great for shallow weeding to remove the small surface weeds that come up in the garden. Then, we have the Digging Tool which is great for breaking up soil in the raised bed or even pots and containers in the greenhouse this is a handy tool to use for gardening. The Small Section Hoe is another handy tool with a triangular-shaped blade that allows you to make little furrows for planting in raised beds. Then, an all-around general tool that is great to have for lightweight and heavyduty planting is the Hoe Dag. It is another high carbon steel tool that contains a sharp edge on both sides. Another great quality about all of these tools is they are made in the USA and have a guaranteed warranty.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Travis and Greg got an unexpected jumpstart in the garden. Travis went ahead and planted some onions in October that needed to be put in the ground. While Greg went ahead and planted some nesting onions, elephant garlic, and shallots in the garden.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about storging turnip greens and the difference between insecticidal soap vs. horticultural oil. Travis goes into Mrs. Hoss's raised bed garden to demonstrate how to pick and store some Tiger collards. He begins by picking a hand full of collard leaves off the bottom of the plant. Then, trims the stems and places them in a bag kind of similar to the produce bags at your supermarkets. Next, tie a knot at the top of the bag, poke some holes for airflow, and they will store away in the fridge for at least a couple of weeks. Greg mentions that the difference between insecticidal soap and horticultural oil is that the oils are heavier and work better on a wider array of insects in the garden. However, the oils do have issues when used in the hot weather conditions whereas the soaps do way better in these certain conditions. So the key take away is to use horticultural oil during the cooler weather months and insecticidal soap during the hot weather months in the garden.<br /> Products of the Week<br /> <br /> All Top Turnips<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OPftlVqCLgM Greg and Travis clean 27:57 Row by Row Episode 74: Maintaining Fall Pests in the Vegetable Garden https://hosstools.com/maintaining-fall-pests-vegetable-garden/ Mon, 21 Oct 2019 17:50:51 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=54090 Fall Pests to Deal With In the South, some of the fall pests that we deal with are whiteflies, cabbage loopers, cabbageworm, flea beetles, and aphids. Whiteflies are known to live underneath the leaves of plants causing problems in the garden. In order to control many of these fall pests, you should spray early in the morning at daylight or late in the afternoon before sunset to effectively manage the pest problems. Fall Garden Spraying Program In order to control fall pests in the garden, we recommend using organic solutions to eliminate pest problems. The first solution we recommend is to use B.t. and Spinosad when dealing with worm problems. The spraying program for B.t. is you mix one ounce per gallon and start spraying early at least once a week in the vegetable garden. If you have a huge outbreak of worms, then you need to use a more powerful solution like Spinosad. When dealing with aphid problems the best solution is Horticultural Oil. The Hort oil also works great on ornamentals surrounding the yard. Similar to the Horticultural Oil, our Neem Oil is another solution that should not be sprayed during the summertime or when it's very hot during the day. The Neem Oil works great for controlling non-worms such as aphids and flea beetles. The Complete Disease Control is another OMRI registered fungicide that works great with any general diseases that you may experience trouble within the vegetable garden. When you start experiencing serious problems with diseases the Liquid Cop is your go-to fungicide to use in the garden. Travis suggests having a spray day in order to ensure you are applying the pest controls at least once a week in the vegetable. This can vary depending on the amount of pressure you are needing to maintain, but Travis explains his rotation program for fall pests control. So one week, he will mix the B.t., Horticultural Oil, and the Complete Disease Control together and apply the mix to the garden. Then, the following week, he will mix together the B.t., Neem Oil, and Liquid Cop. This rotation program allows the fungicides and insecticides to not become susceptible inside the vegetable garden. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Travis has broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, and collards starting to grow in the garden. As well as, he just put kohlrabi, beet, and Brussel sprout transplants in the ground this past weekend. Greg and Travis also discuss the difference between packs and quarter pounds of the All Top Turnips, Purple Top Turnips, Florida Broadleaf Mustard, and Southern Giant Curled Mustard seed varieties. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about Vidalia onions, give an update on sweet potatoes, planting onion transplants in November, and are red onions short, long, or intermediate day. Greg mentions that in a specific area around Lyons and Vidalia, Georgia they produce Vidalia onions. However, the Sweet Harvest and Savannah Sweet onions that we carry are Vidalia type onions meaning they are grown similar to the Vidalia onions grown in those areas. Travis says his sweet potatoes are doing good in the dedicated plot, but the ground has been too hard to dig them up. When planting onion transplants, Greg explains you should start the seeds in the greenhouse six weeks prior to planting in the garden. For example, if wanting to plant in the garden around the first of November then the transplants should be started towards early to mid-October. The guys mention that there are red onion varieties for short day, long day, and intermediate day lengths. Products of the Week Mustard Seeds Turnip Seeds https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O-N1b7VIoDY Fall Pests to Deal With In the South, some of the fall pests that we deal with are whiteflies, cabbage loopers, cabbageworm, flea beetles, and aphids. Whiteflies are known to live underneath the leaves of plants causing problems in the garden. Fall Pests to Deal With<br /> In the South, some of the fall pests that we deal with are whiteflies, cabbage loopers, cabbageworm, flea beetles, and aphids. Whiteflies are known to live underneath the leaves of plants causing problems in the garden. In order to control many of these fall pests, you should spray early in the morning at daylight or late in the afternoon before sunset to effectively manage the pest problems.<br /> Fall Garden Spraying Program<br /> In order to control fall pests in the garden, we recommend using organic solutions to eliminate pest problems. The first solution we recommend is to use B.t. and Spinosad when dealing with worm problems. The spraying program for B.t. is you mix one ounce per gallon and start spraying early at least once a week in the vegetable garden. If you have a huge outbreak of worms, then you need to use a more powerful solution like Spinosad. When dealing with aphid problems the best solution is Horticultural Oil. The Hort oil also works great on ornamentals surrounding the yard. Similar to the Horticultural Oil, our Neem Oil is another solution that should not be sprayed during the summertime or when it's very hot during the day. The Neem Oil works great for controlling non-worms such as aphids and flea beetles. The Complete Disease Control is another OMRI registered fungicide that works great with any general diseases that you may experience trouble within the vegetable garden. When you start experiencing serious problems with diseases the Liquid Cop is your go-to fungicide to use in the garden. Travis suggests having a spray day in order to ensure you are applying the pest controls at least once a week in the vegetable. This can vary depending on the amount of pressure you are needing to maintain, but Travis explains his rotation program for fall pests control. So one week, he will mix the B.t., Horticultural Oil, and the Complete Disease Control together and apply the mix to the garden. Then, the following week, he will mix together the B.t., Neem Oil, and Liquid Cop. This rotation program allows the fungicides and insecticides to not become susceptible inside the vegetable garden.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Travis has broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, and collards starting to grow in the garden. As well as, he just put kohlrabi, beet, and Brussel sprout transplants in the ground this past weekend. Greg and Travis also discuss the difference between packs and quarter pounds of the All Top Turnips, Purple Top Turnips, Florida Broadleaf Mustard, and Southern Giant Curled Mustard seed varieties.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about Vidalia onions, give an update on sweet potatoes, planting onion transplants in November, and are red onions short, long, or intermediate day. Greg mentions that in a specific area around Lyons and Vidalia, Georgia they produce Vidalia onions. However, the Sweet Harvest and Savannah Sweet onions that we carry are Vidalia type onions meaning they are grown similar to the Vidalia onions grown in those areas. Travis says his sweet potatoes are doing good in the dedicated plot, but the ground has been too hard to dig them up. When planting onion transplants, Greg explains you should start the seeds in the greenhouse six weeks prior to planting in the garden. For example, if wanting to plant in the garden around the first of November then the transplants should be started towards early to mid-October. The guys mention that there are red onion varieties for short day, long day, and intermediate day lengths.<br /> Products of the Week<br /> <br /> Mustard Seeds<br /> Turnip Seeds<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O-N1b7VIoDY Greg and Travis clean 34:08 Row by Row Episode 73: The Best Onion Varieties to Grow in Your State https://hosstools.com/best-onion-varieties-grow-state/ Mon, 14 Oct 2019 16:16:15 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=53937 Onion Varieties & Types The three types of onions are intermediate day, short day, and long day. They are separated based on the regions of the country they can be planted and it has to do with the amount of day length at which they start the bulbing process. The two phases of onions are the vegetative stage and the bulbing stage. During the vegetative stage, your goal is to maximize the leaves you are getting on the onion plant. Each of the leaves on the plant represents a ring on the onion. For root development, we supply the onions with a 20-20-20 fertilizer to ensure the plants get the phosphorus and potassium they need. Once the roots are established we will give the onion plants ammonium sulfate to ensure they get plenty of nitrogen. Then, during the bulbing stage, each of the rings is filling up with water and producing a nice big onion. When they reach the bulbing stage we do not need to apply any more fertilizer to the plants, just plenty of water using drip tape. Short Day Onions When preparing to grow short-day onions, the best time to plant is in November if you are in zone 7 and 8. We recommend planting in November because the onion plants will have a nice stand of vegetation before the cold weather comes and then be able to survive it. While in the long run, you will produce healthier and bigger onions in the vegetable garden. The short-day onions will start the bulbing process once day length reaches between 10 to 12 hour days. If onions are planted in November, then the bulbing process will typically start in February and last a month or two which means harvesting will happen in mid to late April or early May depending on the weather conditions. The three varieties for short day onions that we have available are Savannah Sweet, Sweet Harvest, and Texas Legend. Intermediate Day Onions With the intermediate day onions, the best time to plant is around late January or early February and the bulbing stage will happen around mid-April or early May when day length reaches 12 to 14 hours. The only intermediate day onion variety we offer is known as Candy which is a very popular variety to grow in the vegetable garden. Long Day Onions If you live in the northern region the long-day onions are the type of onions that you would need to grow in the vegetable garden. These onions start the bulbing stage once the day length reaches 14 to 16 hours. Therefore, planting short day onions happen around early April so the bulbing stage is around either May or June. The only long day onion variety we have available is Walla Walla which is a widely grown onion that produces really well in northern climates. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Greg and Travis are waiting on the fall crops to germinate and weather temperatures to be just right in the vegetable garden. However, Travis has a good crop of Stonewall cucumbers coming out of the garden as of right now. Greg has got a few crops planted such as cabbage, kohlrabi, broccoli, and Tiger collards. The guys also discuss a couple of new varieties of vegetables. Three new varieties of radish such as Purple Plum, Helios Golden, and Cherry Belle. Then, the new okra varieties available are Cowhorn, Star of David, and Silver Queen. As well as, carrot varieties that include the Chantenay Royal and Black Nebula. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about how many carrot seeds to plant on a 40-foot double row and growing carrots in a raised bed. Travis mentions that he probably uses 3 to 4 packets when planting a 40-foot double row of carrots. Greg says growing carrots in a raised bed is a great idea, keep an eye out for a potential video soon. Products of the Week Single Tine Cultivator https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aOJfHbfz2tM Onion Varieties & Types The three types of onions are intermediate day, short day, and long day. They are separated based on the regions of the country they can be planted and it has to do with the amount of day length at which they start the bulbing ... Onion Varieties & Types<br /> The three types of onions are intermediate day, short day, and long day. They are separated based on the regions of the country they can be planted and it has to do with the amount of day length at which they start the bulbing process. The two phases of onions are the vegetative stage and the bulbing stage. During the vegetative stage, your goal is to maximize the leaves you are getting on the onion plant. Each of the leaves on the plant represents a ring on the onion. For root development, we supply the onions with a 20-20-20 fertilizer to ensure the plants get the phosphorus and potassium they need. Once the roots are established we will give the onion plants ammonium sulfate to ensure they get plenty of nitrogen. Then, during the bulbing stage, each of the rings is filling up with water and producing a nice big onion. When they reach the bulbing stage we do not need to apply any more fertilizer to the plants, just plenty of water using drip tape.<br /> Short Day Onions<br /> When preparing to grow short-day onions, the best time to plant is in November if you are in zone 7 and 8. We recommend planting in November because the onion plants will have a nice stand of vegetation before the cold weather comes and then be able to survive it. While in the long run, you will produce healthier and bigger onions in the vegetable garden. The short-day onions will start the bulbing process once day length reaches between 10 to 12 hour days. If onions are planted in November, then the bulbing process will typically start in February and last a month or two which means harvesting will happen in mid to late April or early May depending on the weather conditions. The three varieties for short day onions that we have available are Savannah Sweet, Sweet Harvest, and Texas Legend.<br /> Intermediate Day Onions<br /> With the intermediate day onions, the best time to plant is around late January or early February and the bulbing stage will happen around mid-April or early May when day length reaches 12 to 14 hours. The only intermediate day onion variety we offer is known as Candy which is a very popular variety to grow in the vegetable garden.<br /> Long Day Onions<br /> If you live in the northern region the long-day onions are the type of onions that you would need to grow in the vegetable garden. These onions start the bulbing stage once the day length reaches 14 to 16 hours. Therefore, planting short day onions happen around early April so the bulbing stage is around either May or June. The only long day onion variety we have available is Walla Walla which is a widely grown onion that produces really well in northern climates.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Greg and Travis are waiting on the fall crops to germinate and weather temperatures to be just right in the vegetable garden. However, Travis has a good crop of Stonewall cucumbers coming out of the garden as of right now. Greg has got a few crops planted such as cabbage, kohlrabi, broccoli, and Tiger collards. The guys also discuss a couple of new varieties of vegetables. Three new varieties of radish such as Purple Plum, Helios Golden, and Cherry Belle. Then, the new okra varieties available are Cowhorn, Star of David, and Silver Queen. As well as, carrot varieties that include the Chantenay Royal and Black Nebula.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about how many carrot seeds to plant on a 40-foot double row and growing carrots in a raised bed. Travis mentions that he probably uses 3 to 4 packets when planting a 40-foot double row of carrots. Greg says growing carrots in a raised bed is a great idea, keep an eye out for a potential video soon.<br /> Products of the Week<br /> <br /> Single Tine Cultivator<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aOJfHbfz2tM Greg and Travis clean 37:14 Row by Row Episode 72: The Best Carrot Varieties for Your Garden Soil https://hosstools.com/best-carrot-varieties-garden-soil/ Mon, 07 Oct 2019 18:43:47 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=53762 Carrot Varieties & Types There are four different types of carrots that all have unique characteristics known as Nantes, Danvers, Chantenay, and Imperator. The first type is known as Nantes, which has a cylindrical shape with the same width and is perfect for storing in jars after harvesting. The next type is Danvers which is known as being the Bugs Bunny carrot that has broad shoulders and fairly sharp taper towards the bottom. While the Chantenay is the short stubby carrot that works the best in hard or clay-like soils in the garden. Lastly, the Imperator is the really long slender shaped carrot that works perfectly in sandy soils. The Viper variety of carrots which is an Imperator type is known for producing the baby type carrots that you commonly see in grocery stores today. If you want more of a Danvers type carrot, Travis recommends growing the Danvers 126 variety. For the Nantes type, there are several varieties such as Bolero, Scarlet Nantes, and our new Gold Nugget carrot. The most carrot varieties that we offer are Imperator types that include Deep Purple, Purple Haze, Yellowstone, Viper, and a new variety coming soon is Black Nebula. The Chantenany type carrot that we have coming very soon to the site is called Royal Chantenay which will work great for people with harder soils. Planting Carrots Similar to planting onions, when planting carrots they should be planted on double rows with drip irrigation in the middle along the row. This allows us to not only save and maximize space in the garden, but it also helps with weed suppression. Travis recommends placing the drip tape anywhere between 2 to 3 inches apart and using the drip tape layer attachment to create a little furrow on each side. Then, you can simply plant the carrot seeds in the furrow along the garden row. Greg mentions when planting carrot varieties, be sure to plant them thick. In order to grow carrots, you also need plenty of patience and a good stale weed seed bank to ensure they germinate. The fertilizer system the guy's like to use on carrots is place a little chicken manure in the furrow before planting the drip tape. Then, use 20-20-20 and Micro-Boost every 2 to 3 weeks throughout the growing season in the vegetable garden. If you set up your garden using the double row planting method, you can use the single wheel hoe between the middles to control any weed problems in the garden. When removing the weeds that are closer to the plants and near the drip tape, the guys recommend using the Single Tine Cultivator. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Greg and Travis try out some elderberry jelly and cowboy candy that a loyal viewer sent them. Travis has planted his first set of cool weather crops in the garden and more to come towards the end of the week. At the end of the show, the guys give a little hint about the topic they will be discussing on next week's show. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about dealing with pest problems and using gravity feed with drip tape. Greg mentions that when planting fall sweet corn, you are more than likely going to deal with pest problems in the garden area. The best products to use when dealing with worm problems is Spinosad and Monterey B.t. Travis talks about using gravity feed drip tape in the garden. Although it could be done, it's not overall feasible and you will face many obstacles in return. Products of the Week Hoss Garden Seeder https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DO6HIqWnITY Carrot Varieties & Types There are four different types of carrots that all have unique characteristics known as Nantes, Danvers, Chantenay, and Imperator. The first type is known as Nantes, which has a cylindrical shape with the same width and is per... Carrot Varieties & Types<br /> There are four different types of carrots that all have unique characteristics known as Nantes, Danvers, Chantenay, and Imperator. The first type is known as Nantes, which has a cylindrical shape with the same width and is perfect for storing in jars after harvesting. The next type is Danvers which is known as being the Bugs Bunny carrot that has broad shoulders and fairly sharp taper towards the bottom. While the Chantenay is the short stubby carrot that works the best in hard or clay-like soils in the garden. Lastly, the Imperator is the really long slender shaped carrot that works perfectly in sandy soils. The Viper variety of carrots which is an Imperator type is known for producing the baby type carrots that you commonly see in grocery stores today. If you want more of a Danvers type carrot, Travis recommends growing the Danvers 126 variety. For the Nantes type, there are several varieties such as Bolero, Scarlet Nantes, and our new Gold Nugget carrot. The most carrot varieties that we offer are Imperator types that include Deep Purple, Purple Haze, Yellowstone, Viper, and a new variety coming soon is Black Nebula. The Chantenany type carrot that we have coming very soon to the site is called Royal Chantenay which will work great for people with harder soils.<br /> Planting Carrots<br /> Similar to planting onions, when planting carrots they should be planted on double rows with drip irrigation in the middle along the row. This allows us to not only save and maximize space in the garden, but it also helps with weed suppression. Travis recommends placing the drip tape anywhere between 2 to 3 inches apart and using the drip tape layer attachment to create a little furrow on each side. Then, you can simply plant the carrot seeds in the furrow along the garden row. Greg mentions when planting carrot varieties, be sure to plant them thick. In order to grow carrots, you also need plenty of patience and a good stale weed seed bank to ensure they germinate. The fertilizer system the guy's like to use on carrots is place a little chicken manure in the furrow before planting the drip tape. Then, use 20-20-20 and Micro-Boost every 2 to 3 weeks throughout the growing season in the vegetable garden. If you set up your garden using the double row planting method, you can use the single wheel hoe between the middles to control any weed problems in the garden. When removing the weeds that are closer to the plants and near the drip tape, the guys recommend using the Single Tine Cultivator.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Greg and Travis try out some elderberry jelly and cowboy candy that a loyal viewer sent them. Travis has planted his first set of cool weather crops in the garden and more to come towards the end of the week. At the end of the show, the guys give a little hint about the topic they will be discussing on next week's show.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about dealing with pest problems and using gravity feed with drip tape. Greg mentions that when planting fall sweet corn, you are more than likely going to deal with pest problems in the garden area. The best products to use when dealing with worm problems is Spinosad and Monterey B.t. Travis talks about using gravity feed drip tape in the garden. Although it could be done, it's not overall feasible and you will face many obstacles in return.<br /> Products of the Week<br /> <br /> Hoss Garden Seeder<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DO6HIqWnITY Greg and Travis clean 33:19 Row by Row Episode 71: Growing Shallots, Leeks, Garlic, and Onions https://hosstools.com/growing-shallots-leeks-garlic-onions/ Mon, 30 Sep 2019 17:25:57 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=53593 Viewer Questions Answered Since several of our viewers have questions about growing shallots, leeks, onions, and garlic the guys decided to answer all your questions on this week's episode. The first question the guys answer is when to plant Vidalia onions in the garden. According to Greg, if you are direct seeding go ahead and plant them in the garden. If you are transplanting Vidalia onions, you can transplant anytime in November. The next question is should elephant garlic seed be cold chilled or stratified for 8 to 10 weeks before planting? In the South, our temperatures never get cold enough to vernalize it so the hard neck garlic or soft neck garlic will stratify. With elephant garlic, you do not have to place into cold temperatures before planting because it will stratify whether we get a cold winter or not. The third question mentioned is what size plots do the guys have in their gardens. In Greg's garden, he has a couple of different plots that range from 20x15, 30x40, and 40x60. Travis mentions that the garden plots are typically average around 1,000 to 1,500 square feet. The next question is wondering the best time to plant English peas and sugar snaps in the garden. Travis says that as soon as the weather conditions stop being higher than 90 degrees, he will begin planting English peas for the Fall. Another question a viewer has is whether or not garlic has any pest problems when growing in the garden. Greg has only experienced aphid problems on garlic, but no tremendous problems where it affects the garlic. He mentions that he has never treated elephant garlic or onions with a pesticide in the past. The sixth question is how many plantable cloves of the elephant garlic per pound and can you plant on double rows. Travis counts the cloves and normally between 10 to 12 cloves come per pound and he does plan to plant them in double rows in the vegetable garden. In the past, Greg has planted shallots using the dibble wheel and he plans to do it again this year. Travis mentions you can plant shallots and onion transplants using the dibble wheel. The next question the guy's answer is if mustard plants will kill off root-knot nematodes. According to Travis, mustard plants will kill root-knot nematodes due to the release of glucosinolates. However, the spicier the mustard the better off it will kill the nematodes, so he suggest using Florida Broadleaf. The ninth question talks about how to cut cover crops in so they won't come back in the garden. Greg says the only cover crop that is invasive and you could have problems with reseeding is Buckwheat. Just make to cut the seed pods and incorporate it back into the garden before they bloom and mature. Another question related to removing cover crops from the garden is can animals eat them down. Travis mentions that you can certainly get animals such as goats, chickens, pigs, and cows in the area to help remove cover crops from the garden area. The last question the guys discuss is whether they are using any nitrogen-fixing inoculants with the cover crops. Greg mentions that if you have a situation where you have been planting legume varieties for a long period of time the beneficial bacteria is already present in the soil. If it is a new area that you are planting a legume, then he would add a nitrogen-fixing inoculate to the garden soil. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Greg and Travis try some garlic dill pickles and jambalaya pickled okra that a viewer sent them from George Farms in Texas. This week, Greg has planted Sweet Harvest onions in his onion bed. Products of the Week Drip Tape Irrigation Kit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3y3eFDmETeQ Viewer Questions Answered Since several of our viewers have questions about growing shallots, leeks, onions, and garlic the guys decided to answer all your questions on this week's episode. The first question the guys answer is when to plant Vidalia o... Viewer Questions Answered<br /> Since several of our viewers have questions about growing shallots, leeks, onions, and garlic the guys decided to answer all your questions on this week's episode. The first question the guys answer is when to plant Vidalia onions in the garden. According to Greg, if you are direct seeding go ahead and plant them in the garden. If you are transplanting Vidalia onions, you can transplant anytime in November. The next question is should elephant garlic seed be cold chilled or stratified for 8 to 10 weeks before planting? In the South, our temperatures never get cold enough to vernalize it so the hard neck garlic or soft neck garlic will stratify. With elephant garlic, you do not have to place into cold temperatures before planting because it will stratify whether we get a cold winter or not. The third question mentioned is what size plots do the guys have in their gardens. In Greg's garden, he has a couple of different plots that range from 20x15, 30x40, and 40x60. Travis mentions that the garden plots are typically average around 1,000 to 1,500 square feet. The next question is wondering the best time to plant English peas and sugar snaps in the garden. Travis says that as soon as the weather conditions stop being higher than 90 degrees, he will begin planting English peas for the Fall. Another question a viewer has is whether or not garlic has any pest problems when growing in the garden. Greg has only experienced aphid problems on garlic, but no tremendous problems where it affects the garlic. He mentions that he has never treated elephant garlic or onions with a pesticide in the past. The sixth question is how many plantable cloves of the elephant garlic per pound and can you plant on double rows. Travis counts the cloves and normally between 10 to 12 cloves come per pound and he does plan to plant them in double rows in the vegetable garden. In the past, Greg has planted shallots using the dibble wheel and he plans to do it again this year. Travis mentions you can plant shallots and onion transplants using the dibble wheel. The next question the guy's answer is if mustard plants will kill off root-knot nematodes. According to Travis, mustard plants will kill root-knot nematodes due to the release of glucosinolates. However, the spicier the mustard the better off it will kill the nematodes, so he suggest using Florida Broadleaf. The ninth question talks about how to cut cover crops in so they won't come back in the garden. Greg says the only cover crop that is invasive and you could have problems with reseeding is Buckwheat. Just make to cut the seed pods and incorporate it back into the garden before they bloom and mature. Another question related to removing cover crops from the garden is can animals eat them down. Travis mentions that you can certainly get animals such as goats, chickens, pigs, and cows in the area to help remove cover crops from the garden area. The last question the guys discuss is whether they are using any nitrogen-fixing inoculants with the cover crops. Greg mentions that if you have a situation where you have been planting legume varieties for a long period of time the beneficial bacteria is already present in the soil. If it is a new area that you are planting a legume, then he would add a nitrogen-fixing inoculate to the garden soil.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Greg and Travis try some garlic dill pickles and jambalaya pickled okra that a viewer sent them from George Farms in Texas. This week, Greg has planted Sweet Harvest onions in his onion bed.<br /> Products of the Week<br /> <br /> Drip Tape Irrigation Kit<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3y3eFDmETeQ Greg and Travis clean 31:28 Row by Row Episode 70: Fall Shallots for a Spring Garden Harvest! https://hosstools.com/fall-shallots-spring-harvest/ Fri, 20 Sep 2019 20:47:32 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=53335 Shallot Varieties The three varieties of fall shallots that we currently offer are Ambition, Monique, and Roderique. The Ambition variety is a traditionally shaped round shallot that contains a red to copper skin color and white flesh interior. The Monique variety is a semi-long shape that has a great disease-resistant and longer storage window. The Roderique is another elongated variety that makes it easier for slicing into smaller pieces for cooking. Fall Shallots Shallots are best known as a cooking onion and can be used in several different recipes when cooking on the homestead. If you combine the flavor of garlic and onion, that is pretty much the flavor profile of a shallot. When it comes to planting fall shallots, there is a proper way of planting them in order for them to be successful in the vegetable garden. Travis mentions that you can take our Single Wheel Hoe with the plow set attachment and create a little trench for the bulbs to be planted in. When placing the shallots in the trench, the root end has to be planted downward with the stem end facing up in the vegetable garden. The guys mention that there rule when it comes to planting alliums is to plant two weeks before your first frost date. For example, our first frost date on average is towards the end of November, so back up two weeks and our ideal planting time would be mid-November. Since the onions, shallots, and elephant garlic are all heavy-feeders they need at least an inch of water each week. Drip tape irrigation is the best way to ensure that these crops are getting all the water they need directly to the plant roots. The fertilizer requirements for the fall shallots is to start off with a complete fertilizer to help with root development. Then, once the plants start growing will switch over to just applying nitrogen. Overall, when planting fall shallots making sure you plant them properly in the garden and apply an accurate amount of irrigation and fertilizer will ensure that you get a successful planting throughout the growing season. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Travis currently has a few onion transplants planted for the fall growing season. However, Greg is going to try transplanting the Savannah Sweet variety in a little onion bed in the vegetable garden area. Most of the transplants in the greenhouse have started developing their true leaves, so the guys plan on applying a little fertilizer like the 20-20-20 to the plants soon. Travis also explains that he is no longer going to do the two-minute tip videos, but will still upload longer videos on Tuesdays instead. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about how much fertilizer to put along a row and how to create a row garden in an unestablished area for the Spring. Travis explains that according to whatever recommended fertilizer you are using and the size of your garden area you simply do a little algebra to figure out the correct amount. Greg mentions when making a new garden area the first step is to get the soil worked in and kill off the vegetative that is currently growing there. Next, take a soil test in order to adjust the soil and get the garden soil in the right range usually between 6 to 7.0. Then, during the wintertime, grow a cover crop of rye until you are ready to work in it again and get it ready for planting. Products of the Week Brass Siphon Mixer Hortonova Trellis Netting https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w15MH9w23_o Shallot Varieties The three varieties of fall shallots that we currently offer are Ambition, Monique, and Roderique. The Ambition variety is a traditionally shaped round shallot that contains a red to copper skin color and white flesh interior. Shallot Varieties<br /> The three varieties of fall shallots that we currently offer are Ambition, Monique, and Roderique. The Ambition variety is a traditionally shaped round shallot that contains a red to copper skin color and white flesh interior. The Monique variety is a semi-long shape that has a great disease-resistant and longer storage window. The Roderique is another elongated variety that makes it easier for slicing into smaller pieces for cooking.<br /> Fall Shallots<br /> Shallots are best known as a cooking onion and can be used in several different recipes when cooking on the homestead. If you combine the flavor of garlic and onion, that is pretty much the flavor profile of a shallot. When it comes to planting fall shallots, there is a proper way of planting them in order for them to be successful in the vegetable garden. Travis mentions that you can take our Single Wheel Hoe with the plow set attachment and create a little trench for the bulbs to be planted in. When placing the shallots in the trench, the root end has to be planted downward with the stem end facing up in the vegetable garden. The guys mention that there rule when it comes to planting alliums is to plant two weeks before your first frost date. For example, our first frost date on average is towards the end of November, so back up two weeks and our ideal planting time would be mid-November. Since the onions, shallots, and elephant garlic are all heavy-feeders they need at least an inch of water each week. Drip tape irrigation is the best way to ensure that these crops are getting all the water they need directly to the plant roots. The fertilizer requirements for the fall shallots is to start off with a complete fertilizer to help with root development. Then, once the plants start growing will switch over to just applying nitrogen. Overall, when planting fall shallots making sure you plant them properly in the garden and apply an accurate amount of irrigation and fertilizer will ensure that you get a successful planting throughout the growing season.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Travis currently has a few onion transplants planted for the fall growing season. However, Greg is going to try transplanting the Savannah Sweet variety in a little onion bed in the vegetable garden area. Most of the transplants in the greenhouse have started developing their true leaves, so the guys plan on applying a little fertilizer like the 20-20-20 to the plants soon. Travis also explains that he is no longer going to do the two-minute tip videos, but will still upload longer videos on Tuesdays instead.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about how much fertilizer to put along a row and how to create a row garden in an unestablished area for the Spring. Travis explains that according to whatever recommended fertilizer you are using and the size of your garden area you simply do a little algebra to figure out the correct amount. Greg mentions when making a new garden area the first step is to get the soil worked in and kill off the vegetative that is currently growing there. Next, take a soil test in order to adjust the soil and get the garden soil in the right range usually between 6 to 7.0. Then, during the wintertime, grow a cover crop of rye until you are ready to work in it again and get it ready for planting.<br /> Products of the Week<br /> <br /> Brass Siphon Mixer<br /> Hortonova Trellis Netting<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w15MH9w23_o Greg and Travis clean 32:45 Row by Row Episode 69: No-Till vs. Tilling the Vegetable Garden Area https://hosstools.com/no-till-tilling-vegetable-garden-area/ Mon, 16 Sep 2019 18:19:32 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=53108 No-Till vs. Tilling the Vegetable Gardening There are several different opinions when it comes to no-till or tilling the garden area. When discussing the difference between tilling and no-till, it all depends on your personal preference whether you want to do it in your garden or not. No-till gardening means no disturbance of the garden soil except for when you place the seeds in the garden. While tilling in the vegetable garden means you are preparing and cultivating the soil for planting with tools such as a tiller, the Double Wheel Hoe, or Hoss Stirrup Hoe. Benefits vs. Downsides of No-Till Gardening The first benefit of no-till is the overall moisture conservation. Since you are not cultivating the soil the soil layer is not broken which provides the garden area with the ability to hold water better. Another major benefit of no-till gardening is erosion control. During heavy rainfalls, the no-till allows for a decrease in losing soil layers. The third benefit is the preservation of soil biology in the vegetable garden. However, this can be more important in certain climates that have areas with richer organic matter in the soils. The last benefit of no-till gardening is no burying of weed seeds in the vegetable garden. When tilling in the garden weed seeds get cultivated into the soil, but with no-tilling, the weed seeds stay on top of the garden soil. Although, along with benefits comes a few downsides to no-tilling in the garden area. The first downside when it comes to a no-till garden is the increase in weed populations. Weed pressures like nutgrass can cause serious problems because they have to be frequently cultivated in order to eliminate them completely from growing in the garden area. Another probably with weeds in a no-till garden is the limited ways to handle and control them. The second downside is during rainfall it does not stick to the soil meaning the water does not absorb into the soil without cultivation. The next major downside is the decrease in good seed germination in the garden soil. In the garden, when the area has been tilled the soil can then provide better seed to soil contact which is needed for good germination. Along, with poor seed germination, no-till takes much more time and energy. This can be an issue caused by mulching because you have to remove it to replant and it can tie up nutrients in the soil. The last downside of no-tilling in the garden area is the reduction of soil compaction. For some crops in the garden like carrots, it can be harder for roots to penetrate in the soil. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, the greenhouse is full of transplants for the fall garden. The guys taste test some cob jelly from a viewer. They also discuss a little bit about the varieties of onions that are coming very soon. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about the spacing and fertilizer needs for tiger collards and all top turnips. As well as, whether or not they experience nitrate buildup in their garden soils. Travis mentions that the fertilizer requirements for both collards and turnips are similar which is one pound per a hundred feet pre-plant. With collard transplants, Travis spaces them one-foot apart and on double rows with drip irrigation in the middle. Greg mentions that in order to avoid having nitrate buildup in the soil, you should apply no more than what you need and place it directly where the plant needs it. Products of the Week Drip Tape Irrigation Ammonium Sulfate Fertilizer https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BbV6S9NT5jY No-Till vs. Tilling the Vegetable Gardening There are several different opinions when it comes to no-till or tilling the garden area. When discussing the difference between tilling and no-till, it all depends on your personal preference whether you wa... No-Till vs. Tilling the Vegetable Gardening<br /> There are several different opinions when it comes to no-till or tilling the garden area. When discussing the difference between tilling and no-till, it all depends on your personal preference whether you want to do it in your garden or not. No-till gardening means no disturbance of the garden soil except for when you place the seeds in the garden. While tilling in the vegetable garden means you are preparing and cultivating the soil for planting with tools such as a tiller, the Double Wheel Hoe, or Hoss Stirrup Hoe.<br /> Benefits vs. Downsides of No-Till Gardening<br /> The first benefit of no-till is the overall moisture conservation. Since you are not cultivating the soil the soil layer is not broken which provides the garden area with the ability to hold water better. Another major benefit of no-till gardening is erosion control. During heavy rainfalls, the no-till allows for a decrease in losing soil layers. The third benefit is the preservation of soil biology in the vegetable garden. However, this can be more important in certain climates that have areas with richer organic matter in the soils. The last benefit of no-till gardening is no burying of weed seeds in the vegetable garden. When tilling in the garden weed seeds get cultivated into the soil, but with no-tilling, the weed seeds stay on top of the garden soil. Although, along with benefits comes a few downsides to no-tilling in the garden area. The first downside when it comes to a no-till garden is the increase in weed populations. Weed pressures like nutgrass can cause serious problems because they have to be frequently cultivated in order to eliminate them completely from growing in the garden area. Another probably with weeds in a no-till garden is the limited ways to handle and control them. The second downside is during rainfall it does not stick to the soil meaning the water does not absorb into the soil without cultivation. The next major downside is the decrease in good seed germination in the garden soil. In the garden, when the area has been tilled the soil can then provide better seed to soil contact which is needed for good germination. Along, with poor seed germination, no-till takes much more time and energy. This can be an issue caused by mulching because you have to remove it to replant and it can tie up nutrients in the soil. The last downside of no-tilling in the garden area is the reduction of soil compaction. For some crops in the garden like carrots, it can be harder for roots to penetrate in the soil.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, the greenhouse is full of transplants for the fall garden. The guys taste test some cob jelly from a viewer. They also discuss a little bit about the varieties of onions that are coming very soon.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about the spacing and fertilizer needs for tiger collards and all top turnips. As well as, whether or not they experience nitrate buildup in their garden soils. Travis mentions that the fertilizer requirements for both collards and turnips are similar which is one pound per a hundred feet pre-plant. With collard transplants, Travis spaces them one-foot apart and on double rows with drip irrigation in the middle. Greg mentions that in order to avoid having nitrate buildup in the soil, you should apply no more than what you need and place it directly where the plant needs it.<br /> Products of the Week<br /> <br /> Drip Tape Irrigation<br /> Ammonium Sulfate Fertilizer<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BbV6S9NT5jY Greg and Travis clean 32:26 Row by Row Episode 68: Growing Brassica Varieties in the Garden https://hosstools.com/growing-brassica-varieties-garden/ Mon, 09 Sep 2019 19:38:50 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=52893 Fertilizing Brassica Varieties When discussing brassica varieties like broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, and Brussel sprouts are all heavy feeder crops. In other words, this means they need more nutrients through fertilizer applications than other crops in the vegetable garden. Cabbage When planting cabbage we recommend injecting around 1.2 pounds of the 20-20-20 per 100 feet to help encourage root development. Then, we will apply 1 pound per 100 feet of Chilean Nitrate at two and fives weeks after transplanting to encourage a straight nitrogen source to the cabbage plants. Cabbage also likes a boron supplement as a micronutrient in the garden. To fulfill the needs of the cabbage we use Micro-Boost to ensure all the nutrients are available for the plants. The cabbage varieties Travis plans to grow this fall is Charleston Wakefield, Cheers, and Rio Grande Red. Broccoli To fertilize broccoli it is best to inject one pound per 100 feet of the 20-20-20 garden fertilizer. Then, the Chilean Nitrate with 1 pound per 100 feet at three and five weeks. Another recommendation that Travis mentions is to hit the broccoli with some calcium nitrate once the heads reach about a quarter size and it will do wonders for your plants. Just like cabbage, broccoli needs boron as a micronutrient, so applying micro-boost every one to two weeks will help in the vegetable garden. The two varieties of broccoli Travis plans to grow this season is Arcadia and Green Magic. Cauliflower To grow cauliflower the garden needs to contain healthy soil that is full of organic matter. The ideal soil range for these brassica varieties is a pH of 6.0 to 6.5. Almost identical to growing broccoli, cauliflower needs one pound per 100 feet of the 20-20-20 and one application of Chilean nitrate at four weeks. The three main micronutrients that cauliflower needs are boron, magnesium, and molybdenum. Our micro-boost will take care of all three micronutrients, so apply it weekly to the cauliflower plants to encourage strong growth development. Travis is planting the Flame Star, Snow Bowl, and Graffiti Cauliflower varieties in the vegetable garden. Brussel Sprouts In order to grow, Brussel sprouts in the garden we need to have cooler weather conditions. Out of all the brassica varieties, Brussel sprouts can be the toughest to grow in the vegetable garden. Since Brussel sprouts take around 100 days to grow, you may experience insect problems such as flea beetles or worms. The ideal time to plant Brussel sprouts is in the fall, but you can plant them in late winter too. The fertilizer requirements for Brussel sprouts is 2.5 pounds of 20-20-20 per 100 feet and 1.5 pounds of calcium nitrate every 4 weeks. The two varieties of Brussel sprouts we have started growing is Jade Cross and Red Bull in the vegetable garden. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, the guys are filling up the greenhouse with transplants for the Fall growing season. Travis has varieties of broccoli, cauliflower, beets, mustard, cabbage, turnips, collards, and a little bit of it all planted currently. While Greg has decided to direct seed his mustard and turnips in the vegetable garden. The guys discuss the most popular item for transplanting seeds which is our seed starting trays. Travis is happy to mention that his sweet corn is growing fast in the garden. Greg still has time for cover crops in the garden before fall. He currently has Buckwheat, Sorghum Sudangrass, and Mustard planted and will have plenty of time to turn them back into the soil. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions if the silage tarp becomes a mosquito breeding ground during rainy periods and whether our seeds are only sold for the southern states or can they be grown in the northern states too. Travis mentions that the tarp does hold a little bit of water after a heavy rain, but it usually evaporates quickly and he has not noticed any mosquitos on top of ... Fertilizing Brassica Varieties When discussing brassica varieties like broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, and Brussel sprouts are all heavy feeder crops. In other words, this means they need more nutrients through fertilizer applications than other crops... Fertilizing Brassica Varieties<br /> When discussing brassica varieties like broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, and Brussel sprouts are all heavy feeder crops. In other words, this means they need more nutrients through fertilizer applications than other crops in the vegetable garden.<br /> Cabbage<br /> When planting cabbage we recommend injecting around 1.2 pounds of the 20-20-20 per 100 feet to help encourage root development. Then, we will apply 1 pound per 100 feet of Chilean Nitrate at two and fives weeks after transplanting to encourage a straight nitrogen source to the cabbage plants. Cabbage also likes a boron supplement as a micronutrient in the garden. To fulfill the needs of the cabbage we use Micro-Boost to ensure all the nutrients are available for the plants. The cabbage varieties Travis plans to grow this fall is Charleston Wakefield, Cheers, and Rio Grande Red.<br /> Broccoli<br /> To fertilize broccoli it is best to inject one pound per 100 feet of the 20-20-20 garden fertilizer. Then, the Chilean Nitrate with 1 pound per 100 feet at three and five weeks. Another recommendation that Travis mentions is to hit the broccoli with some calcium nitrate once the heads reach about a quarter size and it will do wonders for your plants. Just like cabbage, broccoli needs boron as a micronutrient, so applying micro-boost every one to two weeks will help in the vegetable garden. The two varieties of broccoli Travis plans to grow this season is Arcadia and Green Magic.<br /> Cauliflower<br /> To grow cauliflower the garden needs to contain healthy soil that is full of organic matter. The ideal soil range for these brassica varieties is a pH of 6.0 to 6.5. Almost identical to growing broccoli, cauliflower needs one pound per 100 feet of the 20-20-20 and one application of Chilean nitrate at four weeks. The three main micronutrients that cauliflower needs are boron, magnesium, and molybdenum. Our micro-boost will take care of all three micronutrients, so apply it weekly to the cauliflower plants to encourage strong growth development. Travis is planting the Flame Star, Snow Bowl, and Graffiti Cauliflower varieties in the vegetable garden.<br /> Brussel Sprouts<br /> In order to grow, Brussel sprouts in the garden we need to have cooler weather conditions. Out of all the brassica varieties, Brussel sprouts can be the toughest to grow in the vegetable garden. Since Brussel sprouts take around 100 days to grow, you may experience insect problems such as flea beetles or worms. The ideal time to plant Brussel sprouts is in the fall, but you can plant them in late winter too. The fertilizer requirements for Brussel sprouts is 2.5 pounds of 20-20-20 per 100 feet and 1.5 pounds of calcium nitrate every 4 weeks. The two varieties of Brussel sprouts we have started growing is Jade Cross and Red Bull in the vegetable garden.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, the guys are filling up the greenhouse with transplants for the Fall growing season. Travis has varieties of broccoli, cauliflower, beets, mustard, cabbage, turnips, collards, and a little bit of it all planted currently. While Greg has decided to direct seed his mustard and turnips in the vegetable garden. The guys discuss the most popular item for transplanting seeds which is our seed starting trays. Travis is happy to mention that his sweet corn is growing fast in the garden. Greg still has time for cover crops in the garden before fall. He currently has Buckwheat, Sorghum Sudangrass, and Mustard planted and will have plenty of time to turn them back into the soil.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions if the silage tarp becomes a mosquito breeding ground during rainy periods and whether our seeds are only sold for the southern states or can they be grown in the northern states too. Travis mentions that the tarp does hold a little bit of water after a heavy rain, Greg and Travis clean 29:42 Row by Row Episode 67: Benefits of Planting Pelleted Vegetable Seeds https://hosstools.com/benefits-planting-pelleted-seed-varieties/ Tue, 03 Sep 2019 20:13:44 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=52706 Why Plant Pelleted Seed Varieties in the Garden Due to the various amount of seed varieties, certain crops have seeds that are irregularly shaped. The irregularly raw shaped seeds can in return cause problems when trying to plant them using mechanical equipment like a direct seeder or vacuum seeders. The vacuum seeders are typically used by larger greenhouse companies in order to seed their transplant trays a lot faster. In order to use the mechanical equipment to plant the various seed varieties, we need round shaped seeds instead of the irregular shaped seeds. For example, carrots have really small oval-shaped seeds that contain a naturally papery texture which makes the seeds hard to plant in the garden. However, when you have pelleted seed varieties they contain a round-shaped seed that works great in mechanical equipment like the seeders. Having round-shaped seeds allows for easier planting for transplants and direct seeding with our garden seeder. Along with easier planting, you are able to plant faster and save seeds when using pelleted seeds in the vegetable garden. The process of pelleting seeds is they coat the seeds with an inert ingredient which is a clay particle. Then, they put the seeds and the particular type of clay into a tumbler and roll it around until all the seeds reach a certain size. When pelleting seeds you are increasing the weight, size, and shape of the seed depending on the desired characteristics that is needed. Pelleted Seed Varieties The guys go over the pelleted seed varieties that we offer at Hoss Tools. Starting with pelleted lettuce varieties which includes Calshot, Cherokee, Coastal Star, Skyphos, Starfighter, and Tehama. We also carry pelleted carrot seeds which include varieties like the Viper, Yellowstone, Scarlet Nantes, Deep Purple, Gold Nugget and Danvers 126. As well as two pelleted beet varieties such as Early Wonder and Kestral Beets. While a few more beet varieties are going to be released soon in pelleted form. Some other seed varieties that are available are the Candy Onion and Tadorna Leeks. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Greg has some Cherokee Tan pumpkins that he has harvested from the vegetable garden. The Cherokee Tan variety was a winner in maximum yield and flavor profile during the growing season this year. Greg also needs a little help from our viewers in finding out information on the old-timey multiplying nesting onion variety. Travis's mentions that he currently has cucumbers, pole beans, and lots of okra growing in the vegetable garden. He also has planted peaches and cream sweet corn for the fall growing season in the vegetable garden. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about planting carrots on drip tape and cut flower cover crops. Travis recommends growing carrots on a double row of buried drip tape. He simply scatters the carrot seeds thick along the furrow in the vegetable garden. The trick with growing carrots in the vegetable garden is keeping the carrot seed bed wet until germination happens. The best tool to use when applying drip tape in the vegetable garden is our Drip Tape Layer Attachment on our Double Wheel Hoe. Greg mentions that the only cut flower variety that works as a cover crop is Sunflowers. They work the best as a cover crop because they grow quickly and shade out weeds when planted thick in the vegetable garden. Sunflowers have a dense root system which allows them to help with soil erosion in the vegetable garden area as well. Products of the Week Hoss Garden Seeder https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DNTzuuLyByY Why Plant Pelleted Seed Varieties in the Garden Due to the various amount of seed varieties, certain crops have seeds that are irregularly shaped. The irregularly raw shaped seeds can in return cause problems when trying to plant them using mechanical... Why Plant Pelleted Seed Varieties in the Garden<br /> Due to the various amount of seed varieties, certain crops have seeds that are irregularly shaped. The irregularly raw shaped seeds can in return cause problems when trying to plant them using mechanical equipment like a direct seeder or vacuum seeders. The vacuum seeders are typically used by larger greenhouse companies in order to seed their transplant trays a lot faster. In order to use the mechanical equipment to plant the various seed varieties, we need round shaped seeds instead of the irregular shaped seeds. For example, carrots have really small oval-shaped seeds that contain a naturally papery texture which makes the seeds hard to plant in the garden. However, when you have pelleted seed varieties they contain a round-shaped seed that works great in mechanical equipment like the seeders. Having round-shaped seeds allows for easier planting for transplants and direct seeding with our garden seeder. Along with easier planting, you are able to plant faster and save seeds when using pelleted seeds in the vegetable garden. The process of pelleting seeds is they coat the seeds with an inert ingredient which is a clay particle. Then, they put the seeds and the particular type of clay into a tumbler and roll it around until all the seeds reach a certain size. When pelleting seeds you are increasing the weight, size, and shape of the seed depending on the desired characteristics that is needed.<br /> Pelleted Seed Varieties<br /> The guys go over the pelleted seed varieties that we offer at Hoss Tools. Starting with pelleted lettuce varieties which includes Calshot, Cherokee, Coastal Star, Skyphos, Starfighter, and Tehama. We also carry pelleted carrot seeds which include varieties like the Viper, Yellowstone, Scarlet Nantes, Deep Purple, Gold Nugget and Danvers 126. As well as two pelleted beet varieties such as Early Wonder and Kestral Beets. While a few more beet varieties are going to be released soon in pelleted form. Some other seed varieties that are available are the Candy Onion and Tadorna Leeks.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Greg has some Cherokee Tan pumpkins that he has harvested from the vegetable garden. The Cherokee Tan variety was a winner in maximum yield and flavor profile during the growing season this year. Greg also needs a little help from our viewers in finding out information on the old-timey multiplying nesting onion variety. Travis's mentions that he currently has cucumbers, pole beans, and lots of okra growing in the vegetable garden. He also has planted peaches and cream sweet corn for the fall growing season in the vegetable garden.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about planting carrots on drip tape and cut flower cover crops. Travis recommends growing carrots on a double row of buried drip tape. He simply scatters the carrot seeds thick along the furrow in the vegetable garden. The trick with growing carrots in the vegetable garden is keeping the carrot seed bed wet until germination happens. The best tool to use when applying drip tape in the vegetable garden is our Drip Tape Layer Attachment on our Double Wheel Hoe. Greg mentions that the only cut flower variety that works as a cover crop is Sunflowers. They work the best as a cover crop because they grow quickly and shade out weeds when planted thick in the vegetable garden. Sunflowers have a dense root system which allows them to help with soil erosion in the vegetable garden area as well.<br /> Products of the Week<br /> <br /> Hoss Garden Seeder<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DNTzuuLyByY Greg and Travis clean 32:14 Row by Row Episode 66: New Seed Varieties for the Fall Garden https://hosstools.com/new-seed-varieties-fall-garden/ Mon, 26 Aug 2019 20:54:09 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=52562 New Fall Garden Seed Varieties Not only are these seed varieties great to grow in the Fall garden, but a lot of these new seed varieties are exclusive and can only be found here at Hoss Tools. Cabbage The first new seed variety that offers an excellent disease-resistant is Cheers cabbage. Cheers can produce large heads that can usually grow to an average size of 5 lbs. The next variety is the Rio Grande Red which has been studied by Louisiana State University as being the largest red cabbage producer. Then, the Charleston Wakefield is the best-storing cabbage that produces conical heads in the vegetable garden. While the Savoy King provides crinkled-leaves and a crisp texture that makes this variety excellent for eating raw. Carrots When it comes time to planting carrots we recommend direct seeding in October. Unlike the Purple Haze, the new Deep Purple variety has a purple color that is throughout the entire core of the carrot. The next new seed variety we offer is known as Viper. This exclusive variety produces long slender carrots that average around 12 to 14 inches long. Another seed variety that is not necessarily new but we now offer in a new pelleted form for planting in our garden seeder is the Yellowstone carrot variety. Then, we offer the Gold Nugget variety which is a Nantes type carrot meaning that it is blunter on the end as opposed to sharp like the imperator type carrots. Lastly, the Scarlet Nantes is another Nantes type variety that produces carrots that have little tapering from top to bottom and blunt ends. Greens The only new seed varieties of greens we offer is the Southern Giant Curled Mustard. Known as an All-American Selection winner, this variety produces large curled leaves that contain the traditional "mustard green" flavor profile. It is an heirloom variety that has been a staple crop in the South for many years. Leeks Here in the South, leeks can be grown during the Fall, so we now offer two varieties of leeks to grow in the vegetable garden. The Matejko is a hybrid variety that is heat tolerant and rust tolerant, which is a disease that can sometimes be an issue with leeks. While the Tadorna leek is a cool weather variety of leek and can be transplanted in our seed starting trays in the early Fall as well. Lettuce A popular crop to grow in the garden is lettuce varieties. The first new lettuce variety the guys discuss is the pelleted Cherokee variety. The Cherokee variety is known to be the most heat tolerant red lettuce on the market. The next variety is Tehama which is another pelleted variety that is heat tolerant and slow for bolting. Then, we have the Coastal Star romaine variety that produces dark green leaves and full-size heads of crisp lettuce. The last lettuce variety is the Baby Leaf Lettuce Mix. This variety should be planted densely in a garden area and can be harvested several times throughout the growing season. Onions The most popular onion variety to grow in the vegetable garden is the Candy onion. The Candy Onion is an intermediate-day variety that grows well in many regions except for the far north and deep south areas of the country. The next onion variety that we recommend growing in the Fall garden is the Savannah Sweet Onions. The Savannah Sweet is a short-day onion that produces a flattened, granex shape much like the popular Vidalia type onions. Another short-day onion that is similar to the Vidalia onions is the Sweet Harvest variety. However, it produces jumbo to large bulbs, unlike the Savannah Sweet. Lastly, the Natsuguro Bunching variety is a spring onion that is excellent for harvesting several at a time in the vegetable garden. Radishes, Rutabaga, & Turnip Seed Varieties The Easter Egg Radishes are a colorful mix of red, white, and purple radishes to grow in the Fall garden. Another new exciting seed variety that we offer is the Laurentian Rutabaga. This variety has a nice sweet flavor profile that works great in soups and stews. Then, New Fall Garden Seed Varieties Not only are these seed varieties great to grow in the Fall garden, but a lot of these new seed varieties are exclusive and can only be found here at Hoss Tools. Cabbage The first new seed variety that offers an excell... New Fall Garden Seed Varieties<br /> Not only are these seed varieties great to grow in the Fall garden, but a lot of these new seed varieties are exclusive and can only be found here at Hoss Tools.<br /> Cabbage<br /> The first new seed variety that offers an excellent disease-resistant is Cheers cabbage. Cheers can produce large heads that can usually grow to an average size of 5 lbs. The next variety is the Rio Grande Red which has been studied by Louisiana State University as being the largest red cabbage producer. Then, the Charleston Wakefield is the best-storing cabbage that produces conical heads in the vegetable garden. While the Savoy King provides crinkled-leaves and a crisp texture that makes this variety excellent for eating raw.<br /> Carrots<br /> When it comes time to planting carrots we recommend direct seeding in October. Unlike the Purple Haze, the new Deep Purple variety has a purple color that is throughout the entire core of the carrot. The next new seed variety we offer is known as Viper. This exclusive variety produces long slender carrots that average around 12 to 14 inches long. Another seed variety that is not necessarily new but we now offer in a new pelleted form for planting in our garden seeder is the Yellowstone carrot variety. Then, we offer the Gold Nugget variety which is a Nantes type carrot meaning that it is blunter on the end as opposed to sharp like the imperator type carrots. Lastly, the Scarlet Nantes is another Nantes type variety that produces carrots that have little tapering from top to bottom and blunt ends.<br /> Greens<br /> The only new seed varieties of greens we offer is the Southern Giant Curled Mustard. Known as an All-American Selection winner, this variety produces large curled leaves that contain the traditional "mustard green" flavor profile. It is an heirloom variety that has been a staple crop in the South for many years.<br /> Leeks<br /> Here in the South, leeks can be grown during the Fall, so we now offer two varieties of leeks to grow in the vegetable garden. The Matejko is a hybrid variety that is heat tolerant and rust tolerant, which is a disease that can sometimes be an issue with leeks. While the Tadorna leek is a cool weather variety of leek and can be transplanted in our seed starting trays in the early Fall as well.<br /> Lettuce<br /> A popular crop to grow in the garden is lettuce varieties. The first new lettuce variety the guys discuss is the pelleted Cherokee variety. The Cherokee variety is known to be the most heat tolerant red lettuce on the market. The next variety is Tehama which is another pelleted variety that is heat tolerant and slow for bolting. Then, we have the Coastal Star romaine variety that produces dark green leaves and full-size heads of crisp lettuce. The last lettuce variety is the Baby Leaf Lettuce Mix. This variety should be planted densely in a garden area and can be harvested several times throughout the growing season.<br /> Onions<br /> The most popular onion variety to grow in the vegetable garden is the Candy onion. The Candy Onion is an intermediate-day variety that grows well in many regions except for the far north and deep south areas of the country. The next onion variety that we recommend growing in the Fall garden is the Savannah Sweet Onions. The Savannah Sweet is a short-day onion that produces a flattened, granex shape much like the popular Vidalia type onions. Another short-day onion that is similar to the Vidalia onions is the Sweet Harvest variety. However, it produces jumbo to large bulbs, unlike the Savannah Sweet. Lastly, the Natsuguro Bunching variety is a spring onion that is excellent for harvesting several at a time in the vegetable garden.<br /> Radishes, Rutabaga, & Turnip Seed Varieties<br /> The Easter Egg Radishes are a colorful mix of red, white, and purple radishes to grow in the Fall garden. Another new exciting seed variety that we offer is the Laurentian Rutabaga. Greg and Travis clean 28:34 Row by Row Episode 65: Fall Planting Schedule for the Vegetable Garden https://hosstools.com/fall-planting-schedule/ Mon, 19 Aug 2019 18:03:08 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=52190 Fall Planting Schedule It is no secret that the most popular growing season for gardeners is the Fall. When deciding on a fall planting schedule there are several crops that can be planted due to the weather conditions being not too cold or hot. This is the perfect time to get maximum production of crops to last you on into the colder months. Best Fall Crops to Plant When direct seeding in August we recommend planting with our garden seeder to plant sweet corn, pole beans, and cucumbers. However, when it comes to transplanting we like to use our seed starting trays to plant crops such as green magic broccoli, tiger collards, kale, Brussel sprouts, cauliflower, cabbage, and kohlrabi. In September, we recommend direct-seeding crops such as English peas, all top turnips, mustard, premium greens mix, and Easter Egg radishes. For transplanting in September we prefer to plant Calshot Romaine lettuce, beets, and Calendula Prince Mix. In October, the guys plan to have a Fall planting schedule of direct-seeded crops like carrots and cool-season cover crops. Then, lastly in November is the best time to plant onions, shallots, and leeks. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Travis has some muscadines which are a staple in the South. While Greg shows off some Blue Bayou Pumpkins that he has harvested from the vegetable garden. The guys taste test the pumpkins in the form of sliced wedges, pumpkin soup, and pumpkin muffins. Travis also discusses the till and tarp technique he has been using at his consultant farm. This method is being used in a newer garden plot area that is covered in Bermuda grass. He has covered the area with a silage tarp and has left it to sit there for 2 to 3 weeks. After a couple of weeks, he has folded the tarp back and tilled it at one end, then covered the area again. This repetitive method is creating a weed-free environment because you are tilling the weed seeds to the top of the soil then killing them off with the silage tarp that is covering the garden area. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about curing pumpkins, the start-up area for a market garden, controlling the pest in the garden, and how their shallots did this season. Greg has just finished harvesting his Blue Bayou and Cherokee Tan pumpkin varieties from the vegetable garden. He likes to cure them by placing them underneath the barn and in the shade. As long as they stay in the shade and dry they can cure for around three to four weeks. Travis currently has around 10 to 12 thousand square feet of area that he works in for his market gardening. If you are doing the market gardening part-time, 10 to 12 thousand square feet is the perfect size for a startup gardening area to work in. When it comes to pest control in the garden, our most popular products are Neem Oil, Monterey B.t., and Spinosad to name a few. In the Spring, the guys had an okay growing season of shallots. The guys are planning to plant them again according to their Fall planting schedule because they are similar to onions so they hope to get a better crop this coming growing season. The last question they discuss is when will the new fall seed varieties be available on our website. The guys mention that we are currently working hard to get them packed and available on the website every day. If you want to get updated when new seeds are available, you can be added to our email newsletter and be the first to know all about what's new at Hoss Tools. Products of the Week Cheers Cabbage Savoy King Rio Grande Red Charleston Wakefield https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kw6Ng4RdfqY Fall Planting Schedule It is no secret that the most popular growing season for gardeners is the Fall. When deciding on a fall planting schedule there are several crops that can be planted due to the weather conditions being not too cold or hot. Fall Planting Schedule<br /> It is no secret that the most popular growing season for gardeners is the Fall. When deciding on a fall planting schedule there are several crops that can be planted due to the weather conditions being not too cold or hot. This is the perfect time to get maximum production of crops to last you on into the colder months.<br /> Best Fall Crops to Plant<br /> When direct seeding in August we recommend planting with our garden seeder to plant sweet corn, pole beans, and cucumbers. However, when it comes to transplanting we like to use our seed starting trays to plant crops such as green magic broccoli, tiger collards, kale, Brussel sprouts, cauliflower, cabbage, and kohlrabi. In September, we recommend direct-seeding crops such as English peas, all top turnips, mustard, premium greens mix, and Easter Egg radishes. For transplanting in September we prefer to plant Calshot Romaine lettuce, beets, and Calendula Prince Mix. In October, the guys plan to have a Fall planting schedule of direct-seeded crops like carrots and cool-season cover crops. Then, lastly in November is the best time to plant onions, shallots, and leeks.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Travis has some muscadines which are a staple in the South. While Greg shows off some Blue Bayou Pumpkins that he has harvested from the vegetable garden. The guys taste test the pumpkins in the form of sliced wedges, pumpkin soup, and pumpkin muffins. Travis also discusses the till and tarp technique he has been using at his consultant farm. This method is being used in a newer garden plot area that is covered in Bermuda grass. He has covered the area with a silage tarp and has left it to sit there for 2 to 3 weeks. After a couple of weeks, he has folded the tarp back and tilled it at one end, then covered the area again. This repetitive method is creating a weed-free environment because you are tilling the weed seeds to the top of the soil then killing them off with the silage tarp that is covering the garden area.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about curing pumpkins, the start-up area for a market garden, controlling the pest in the garden, and how their shallots did this season. Greg has just finished harvesting his Blue Bayou and Cherokee Tan pumpkin varieties from the vegetable garden. He likes to cure them by placing them underneath the barn and in the shade. As long as they stay in the shade and dry they can cure for around three to four weeks. Travis currently has around 10 to 12 thousand square feet of area that he works in for his market gardening. If you are doing the market gardening part-time, 10 to 12 thousand square feet is the perfect size for a startup gardening area to work in. When it comes to pest control in the garden, our most popular products are Neem Oil, Monterey B.t., and Spinosad to name a few. In the Spring, the guys had an okay growing season of shallots. The guys are planning to plant them again according to their Fall planting schedule because they are similar to onions so they hope to get a better crop this coming growing season. The last question they discuss is when will the new fall seed varieties be available on our website. The guys mention that we are currently working hard to get them packed and available on the website every day. If you want to get updated when new seeds are available, you can be added to our email newsletter and be the first to know all about what's new at Hoss Tools.<br /> Products of the Week<br /> <br /> Cheers Cabbage<br /> Savoy King<br /> Rio Grande Red<br /> Charleston Wakefield<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kw6Ng4RdfqY Greg and Travis clean 25:48 Row by Row Episode 64: Best Small Scale Market Farming Model! https://hosstools.com/best-small-scale-market-farming/ Mon, 12 Aug 2019 18:31:07 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=52042 Market Farming Strategies There are a few different methods when it comes to small scale market farming. The two most popular models are the community-supported agriculture strategy and the farmers market strategy. However, many factors play into which model would work best for you in your location and what you prefer for your vegetable garden. Small Scale Market Farming Model Travis uses a little different market farming strategy than the normal community-supported agriculture or farmers market strategies. He uses a weekly bag model strategy which requires no upfront money and he takes bag orders from week to week. Each bag is $20 and contains five items each week for the customer. However, for the most part, customers do not get to customize their orders due to the vegetable garden variance and it can be a time-consuming process. When it comes to the quantities of how much is in the bag based on each item Travis likes to put enough for a family of four to have a side dish for supper. Travis shows off an example of what typically comes in the weekly bag model. The bag contains a set of four slicing cucumbers, four Goldprize squash, three Nubia eggplants, two small wonder spaghetti squash, and one hai kabocha squash all from the vegetable garden. There are a couple of differences between buying a weekly bag instead of buying vegetables from the grocery store. Travis mentions that most the vegetable varieties that if he offers in his weekly bag model you cannot get in the grocery store. Another benefit of buying the weekly bag of vegetables is the taste. With green vegetables like collards and kale, the taste is a lot better than in the grocery store because they tend to be healthier and the home gardener watches what products he uses in the vegetable garden. Another advantage you can add to the weekly bag model is by branding the bag and making recipe cards to go along with the vegetables inside the bag. Due to some of the different varieties of vegetables, recipe cards will help people learn how to cook these unfamiliar varieties like the Kabocha squash. Travis main marketing strategy is done through Facebook and a little email to customers. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Greg talks about his Cherokee Tan Pumpkins that he tried out in the garden this year. Although they turned out smaller than he anticipated, the disease resistance was excellent during the growing season this year in the vegetable garden. He also has a Blue Bayou Pumpkin variety that has a great disease resistance as well. It is a hybrid variety that improves production and contains a high sugar content that makes it great for eating. Travis shows off a new fertilizer product that we now carry called Ammonium Sulfate. This fertilizer comes in handy when growing onions, garlic, elephant garlic, leeks, and shallots. The guys also share a little information on what is going to be available soon in the new seed lineup for this year. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about cut flowers and planting a fall garden. When it comes to selling cut flowers at a market, Greg mentions that his cut flower expert friend Lisa Ziegler recommends using a CBVN tablet in order to preserve cut flowers for selling at the market. Travis mentions the first thing to get started in the garden is transplanting Tiger Collards, Lacinato Kale, Cheers Cabbage, and Green Magic Broccolli. These four varieties grow maximum production and are easy to grow in the vegetable garden. Products of the Week Ammonium Sulfate Fertilizer https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tUevZyNGAsc Market Farming Strategies There are a few different methods when it comes to small scale market farming. The two most popular models are the community-supported agriculture strategy and the farmers market strategy. However, Market Farming Strategies<br /> There are a few different methods when it comes to small scale market farming. The two most popular models are the community-supported agriculture strategy and the farmers market strategy. However, many factors play into which model would work best for you in your location and what you prefer for your vegetable garden.<br /> Small Scale Market Farming Model<br /> Travis uses a little different market farming strategy than the normal community-supported agriculture or farmers market strategies. He uses a weekly bag model strategy which requires no upfront money and he takes bag orders from week to week. Each bag is $20 and contains five items each week for the customer. However, for the most part, customers do not get to customize their orders due to the vegetable garden variance and it can be a time-consuming process. When it comes to the quantities of how much is in the bag based on each item Travis likes to put enough for a family of four to have a side dish for supper. Travis shows off an example of what typically comes in the weekly bag model. The bag contains a set of four slicing cucumbers, four Goldprize squash, three Nubia eggplants, two small wonder spaghetti squash, and one hai kabocha squash all from the vegetable garden. There are a couple of differences between buying a weekly bag instead of buying vegetables from the grocery store. Travis mentions that most the vegetable varieties that if he offers in his weekly bag model you cannot get in the grocery store. Another benefit of buying the weekly bag of vegetables is the taste. With green vegetables like collards and kale, the taste is a lot better than in the grocery store because they tend to be healthier and the home gardener watches what products he uses in the vegetable garden. Another advantage you can add to the weekly bag model is by branding the bag and making recipe cards to go along with the vegetables inside the bag. Due to some of the different varieties of vegetables, recipe cards will help people learn how to cook these unfamiliar varieties like the Kabocha squash. Travis main marketing strategy is done through Facebook and a little email to customers.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Greg talks about his Cherokee Tan Pumpkins that he tried out in the garden this year. Although they turned out smaller than he anticipated, the disease resistance was excellent during the growing season this year in the vegetable garden. He also has a Blue Bayou Pumpkin variety that has a great disease resistance as well. It is a hybrid variety that improves production and contains a high sugar content that makes it great for eating. Travis shows off a new fertilizer product that we now carry called Ammonium Sulfate. This fertilizer comes in handy when growing onions, garlic, elephant garlic, leeks, and shallots. The guys also share a little information on what is going to be available soon in the new seed lineup for this year.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about cut flowers and planting a fall garden. When it comes to selling cut flowers at a market, Greg mentions that his cut flower expert friend Lisa Ziegler recommends using a CBVN tablet in order to preserve cut flowers for selling at the market. Travis mentions the first thing to get started in the garden is transplanting Tiger Collards, Lacinato Kale, Cheers Cabbage, and Green Magic Broccolli. These four varieties grow maximum production and are easy to grow in the vegetable garden.<br /> Products of the Week<br /> <br /> Ammonium Sulfate Fertilizer<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tUevZyNGAsc Greg and Travis clean 31:35 Row by Row Episode 63: Small Scale Market Farming https://hosstools.com/small-scale-market-farming/ Fri, 26 Jul 2019 17:27:32 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=51563 Small Scale Market Farming There are a couple of different models that small scale market farmers use when it comes to growing your own food. The first model of market farming is CSA which is Community Supported Agriculture. This system is the process of buying shares upfront at the beginning of the season that the farmer delivers throughout the growing season. So if there is crop failure and the farmer cannot deliver the crops then you do not get your money back. Another small scale market farming model is selling at the farmers market. Nowadays, farmers markets have become a sometimes weekend-long event in several different towns or cities. From the guys experience the best farmers markets they have been to has been in higher populated areas. The last model, the guys discuss is the wholesale model or larger scale selling of produce. This can be for people that like growing produce and then sell it to country stores, restaurants,  or other local markets. Out of all three small scale market farming models, it can vary which one would work best for you as an individual and your personal preference. Popular Techniques & Common Problems Depending on certain areas in the North compared to the South, not every gardening technique works best. For example, a popular technique in some gardening areas is the use of 30-inch raised beds. Due to the guys growing so many different varieties of vegetables throughout the growing season the raised beds do not work for them personally. Another popular technique is heavy composting in the North. However, living in the South, we believe in providing good compost to improve soil structures for healthier plants, but heavy composting will burn out and leave our soils looking like sand. A method that is popular in the North and South is intensive growing. The meaning behind intensive growing is growing as much in the garden as you can in a given space. Some common problems that people have when getting started on small scale market farming is no experience growing in a garden, focusing too much on schematic details, and finding individuals that will buy on a consistent regular basis. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, the guys do not have too many vegetables growing in the garden due to the weather conditions. Greg is currently cleaning out his garden, but he still has some ProCut Sunflowers and Zinnias growing. In the greenhouse, he is starting to grow some Cockscomb. Travis has been growing cover crops in his garden. He recently planted Top Millet and Buckwheat that helps with improving the soil structure and weed suppression. The guys discuss some new seeds that will be coming very soon to the website. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about when they are going to start growing collards and kale plants and where they get all of there knowledge from. Travis says if planting kale and collards by transplant start those at the end of August to early September. Greg says if you direct seeding plant them around the beginning of October. A lot of the knowledge that the guys have accumulated over the years is through informal and formal studying. Greg has done a lot of studying on insects, diseases, and received some certifications in agronomy and horticulture. As well as, experienced a lot of hands-on learning through various jobs in the industry. While Travis has a bachelor's and a master's degree in Biology and studied at the Ph.D. level for four years. Overall, a lot of the knowledge comes from getting in the garden and trying new growing techniques all year round in the vegetable garden. Products of the Week Winter Harvest Handbook The Market Gardener The New Organic Grower https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DErW3qM2QT4 Small Scale Market Farming There are a couple of different models that small scale market farmers use when it comes to growing your own food. The first model of market farming is CSA which is Community Supported Agriculture. Small Scale Market Farming<br /> There are a couple of different models that small scale market farmers use when it comes to growing your own food. The first model of market farming is CSA which is Community Supported Agriculture. This system is the process of buying shares upfront at the beginning of the season that the farmer delivers throughout the growing season. So if there is crop failure and the farmer cannot deliver the crops then you do not get your money back. Another small scale market farming model is selling at the farmers market. Nowadays, farmers markets have become a sometimes weekend-long event in several different towns or cities. From the guys experience the best farmers markets they have been to has been in higher populated areas. The last model, the guys discuss is the wholesale model or larger scale selling of produce. This can be for people that like growing produce and then sell it to country stores, restaurants,  or other local markets. Out of all three small scale market farming models, it can vary which one would work best for you as an individual and your personal preference.<br /> Popular Techniques & Common Problems<br /> Depending on certain areas in the North compared to the South, not every gardening technique works best. For example, a popular technique in some gardening areas is the use of 30-inch raised beds. Due to the guys growing so many different varieties of vegetables throughout the growing season the raised beds do not work for them personally. Another popular technique is heavy composting in the North. However, living in the South, we believe in providing good compost to improve soil structures for healthier plants, but heavy composting will burn out and leave our soils looking like sand. A method that is popular in the North and South is intensive growing. The meaning behind intensive growing is growing as much in the garden as you can in a given space. Some common problems that people have when getting started on small scale market farming is no experience growing in a garden, focusing too much on schematic details, and finding individuals that will buy on a consistent regular basis.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, the guys do not have too many vegetables growing in the garden due to the weather conditions. Greg is currently cleaning out his garden, but he still has some ProCut Sunflowers and Zinnias growing. In the greenhouse, he is starting to grow some Cockscomb. Travis has been growing cover crops in his garden. He recently planted Top Millet and Buckwheat that helps with improving the soil structure and weed suppression. The guys discuss some new seeds that will be coming very soon to the website.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about when they are going to start growing collards and kale plants and where they get all of there knowledge from. Travis says if planting kale and collards by transplant start those at the end of August to early September. Greg says if you direct seeding plant them around the beginning of October. A lot of the knowledge that the guys have accumulated over the years is through informal and formal studying. Greg has done a lot of studying on insects, diseases, and received some certifications in agronomy and horticulture. As well as, experienced a lot of hands-on learning through various jobs in the industry. While Travis has a bachelor's and a master's degree in Biology and studied at the Ph.D. level for four years. Overall, a lot of the knowledge comes from getting in the garden and trying new growing techniques all year round in the vegetable garden.<br /> Products of the Week<br /> <br /> Winter Harvest Handbook<br /> The Market Gardener<br /> The New Organic Grower<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DErW3qM2QT4 Greg and Travis clean 37:28 Row by Row Episode 62: Bet You Didn’t Know Cover Crops Could Do This! https://hosstools.com/bet-you-cover-crops-could-do-this/ Mon, 22 Jul 2019 17:20:46 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=51339 Question & Answers Segment On this week’s episode, the guys answer viewer questions about a couple of different cover crops grown in the vegetable garden. The first question is trying to determine if growing Austrian Pea for the honeybee population in the garden is good or not. Greg mentions that the Austrian pea is a wintertime pea so it can extend the season but it would not be his first choice for pollinators. The second question is all about the guy's thoughts about allelopathic plants. For example, allelopathic qualities of cover crops such as peas or vetch help with nutgrass problems. While Buckwheat is allelopathic to pigweed. Thirdly, the guys discuss the issues causing deformation in melons. Greg explains the two main causes of deformation in melons is due to infrequent watering and poor pollination. Next, they discuss various vegetables that work best when planted on drip tape irrigation. Travis mentions that he uses his drip tape on almost everything except Irish potatoes. Using drip tape will save you time, conserve water, and reduce weed pressures greatly. Recently the guys talked about figs that have a closed-end and keeps the bugs out. Due to some research that LSU has done in the past, this type of fig variety is called the LSU Purple variety. The guys then discuss whether the silage tarps control nutsedge or not. Travis explains the silage tarps will help the nutsedge a little bit but not like the other weeds. You basically just have to aggravate the soil with the Wheel Hoe or incorporate some cover crops like Austrian pea into the garden. Next, the guys talk about how heavy silage tarps are and ordering bigger tarps. Greg says the silage tarps weigh about 60 pounds and are heavy depending on your size. It can be carried by one person but it's more ideal for two people. When discussing fig trees Greg recommends planting fruit trees in the fall because it gives them a chance to get started without stressing. He also says amending the soil before planting and keeping it watered will help the fig trees as well. Then, they discuss the most productive pepper variety in the garden. The Aruba Cubanelle peppers are a hybrid variety that is the front runner in maximum yield when it comes to all the other pepper varieties we carry. The next question deals with how to treat Japanese beetle damage on flowers and vegetables. Greg says rotating between Neem Oil and Pyrtherin early on and keeping the garden clean will help control those pest issues. The last question that the guy's answer is for new garden spots whether or not you should add a tarp first then grow a cover crop or grow a cover crop then tarp. Travis explains if you have a way of cleaning or tilling the garden spot to prepare it to plant cover crops then tarp. However, if you don't have a tiller or a way to clean the garden area tarp it during the summer and plant fall cover crops. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, with the summer weather getting hotter and hotter the guys discuss a couple of different hot pepper varieties such as the Serrano, Cayenne, and Brazilian Orchid. Greg is about done growing for this season. However, he still has a few sunflower and zinnia varieties planted that have been the prettiest crop thus far in the garden. The only vegetable producing he has going on in the garden is okra. The guys are both in the cleanup phase to prepare it for fall planting season. The guys also talk a little bit about the seed line up coming out soon. Product of the Week Hoss Hats https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NxqKM0XQfWY Question & Answers Segment On this week’s episode, the guys answer viewer questions about a couple of different cover crops grown in the vegetable garden. The first question is trying to determine if growing Austrian Pea for the honeybee population in... Question & Answers Segment<br /> On this week’s episode, the guys answer viewer questions about a couple of different cover crops grown in the vegetable garden. The first question is trying to determine if growing Austrian Pea for the honeybee population in the garden is good or not. Greg mentions that the Austrian pea is a wintertime pea so it can extend the season but it would not be his first choice for pollinators. The second question is all about the guy's thoughts about allelopathic plants. For example, allelopathic qualities of cover crops such as peas or vetch help with nutgrass problems. While Buckwheat is allelopathic to pigweed. Thirdly, the guys discuss the issues causing deformation in melons. Greg explains the two main causes of deformation in melons is due to infrequent watering and poor pollination. Next, they discuss various vegetables that work best when planted on drip tape irrigation. Travis mentions that he uses his drip tape on almost everything except Irish potatoes. Using drip tape will save you time, conserve water, and reduce weed pressures greatly. Recently the guys talked about figs that have a closed-end and keeps the bugs out. Due to some research that LSU has done in the past, this type of fig variety is called the LSU Purple variety. The guys then discuss whether the silage tarps control nutsedge or not. Travis explains the silage tarps will help the nutsedge a little bit but not like the other weeds. You basically just have to aggravate the soil with the Wheel Hoe or incorporate some cover crops like Austrian pea into the garden. Next, the guys talk about how heavy silage tarps are and ordering bigger tarps. Greg says the silage tarps weigh about 60 pounds and are heavy depending on your size. It can be carried by one person but it's more ideal for two people. When discussing fig trees Greg recommends planting fruit trees in the fall because it gives them a chance to get started without stressing. He also says amending the soil before planting and keeping it watered will help the fig trees as well. Then, they discuss the most productive pepper variety in the garden. The Aruba Cubanelle peppers are a hybrid variety that is the front runner in maximum yield when it comes to all the other pepper varieties we carry. The next question deals with how to treat Japanese beetle damage on flowers and vegetables. Greg says rotating between Neem Oil and Pyrtherin early on and keeping the garden clean will help control those pest issues. The last question that the guy's answer is for new garden spots whether or not you should add a tarp first then grow a cover crop or grow a cover crop then tarp. Travis explains if you have a way of cleaning or tilling the garden spot to prepare it to plant cover crops then tarp. However, if you don't have a tiller or a way to clean the garden area tarp it during the summer and plant fall cover crops.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, with the summer weather getting hotter and hotter the guys discuss a couple of different hot pepper varieties such as the Serrano, Cayenne, and Brazilian Orchid. Greg is about done growing for this season. However, he still has a few sunflower and zinnia varieties planted that have been the prettiest crop thus far in the garden. The only vegetable producing he has going on in the garden is okra. The guys are both in the cleanup phase to prepare it for fall planting season. The guys also talk a little bit about the seed line up coming out soon.<br /> Product of the Week<br /> <br /> Hoss Hats<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NxqKM0XQfWY Greg and Travis clean 31:25 Row by Row Episode 61: Using Silage Tarps to Make Beautiful Garden Soil! https://hosstools.com/silage-tarps-beautiful-garden-soils/ Fri, 12 Jul 2019 15:42:02 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=50982 Occultation vs. Solarization Occultation basically means blocking something from view. For example, when studying Astronomy, when we experience an eclipse and the moon is blocked from the sun that is occultation. There are two forms of silage tarps that are used for solarization and occultation in the garden. For solarization, the clear tarps heat up the soil and are used if you want to sterilize your soil due to either nematode, fungal, or bacterial pressures in the vegetable garden. For occultation, the black tarps are used for maintaining soil structure, organic matter, and promote bacterial activity in the garden soil. Using Occultation in the Garden Soil On this week's episode, the guys explain how occultation is used in the garden. When we block the garden soil from the sunlight this known as occultation. To use this technique in the garden we take Silage Tarps to cover the soil area. The main purpose of occultation with the black tarp is you create this moist environment that starts weed germination but they end up dying off as soon as the germinate because there's no life to feed off of. This method is perfect for creating a stale weed seedbed or weed seed bank. The occultation is used to prepare your soil without using any kind gas-powered equipment such as a tiller, tractor, or harrow. So if you want to start a new garden area, but have no form of gas-powered equipment, add this Silage Tarp to that area. It works great when laid down for three to four weeks in the summertime or maybe up to six weeks in the wintertime. Then, just pull it up and go to planting vegetables in the garden area. Travis recommends to mow it down as low as you could then apply the silage tarp. If you are like Greg and have a longer existing garden spot that has high weed pressure these Silage tarps work great to suppress this weed seed bank. Another great benefit of Silage Tarps is it maintains the integrity of the garden soil. With the tendency of overworking our soils, this tarp method allows us to not overwork which maintains the proper tilth that we need to have for a successful vegetable garden. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Greg has a Tubtrug colander full of Jambalaya and some stragglers of Red Burgundy Okra. Both productive okra varieties, but Jambalaya is top-notch when it comes to maximum production in the vegetable garden. Travis brought some of Greg's favorite Brown Turkey Figs. He also has a Stonewall cucumber that was harvested off his Hortonova Trellis Netting. Growing on a trellis allows for higher yields and more growing space because vegetables are growing vertically in the garden. The guys also show off the different color Hoss Hats that we carry in Charcoal, Red, and Camo. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about what they learned from this growing season that they wouldn't like to do again and squash bug pressures during the Fall. Although they had a good garden season due to the dry weather they both found one thing that they learned to not do in the garden again. For Greg, he prefers not to grow southern peas in the garden again. He did well growing the peas, but he cannot control the Southern pea curculio. Travis agrees that he can't grow them as well. During late Fall and September, the squash bug pressures are probably the highest during the Fall months. Travis says to avoid even trying to grow any kind cucurbit vegetables during those months. The guys recommend planting any kind of cucurbits early in the garden to avoid those harsh squash bug pressures. Product of the Week Silage Tarp https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w1F_bihSw-g Occultation vs. Solarization Occultation basically means blocking something from view. For example, when studying Astronomy, when we experience an eclipse and the moon is blocked from the sun that is occultation. Occultation vs. Solarization<br /> Occultation basically means blocking something from view. For example, when studying Astronomy, when we experience an eclipse and the moon is blocked from the sun that is occultation. There are two forms of silage tarps that are used for solarization and occultation in the garden. For solarization, the clear tarps heat up the soil and are used if you want to sterilize your soil due to either nematode, fungal, or bacterial pressures in the vegetable garden. For occultation, the black tarps are used for maintaining soil structure, organic matter, and promote bacterial activity in the garden soil.<br /> Using Occultation in the Garden Soil<br /> On this week's episode, the guys explain how occultation is used in the garden. When we block the garden soil from the sunlight this known as occultation. To use this technique in the garden we take Silage Tarps to cover the soil area. The main purpose of occultation with the black tarp is you create this moist environment that starts weed germination but they end up dying off as soon as the germinate because there's no life to feed off of. This method is perfect for creating a stale weed seedbed or weed seed bank. The occultation is used to prepare your soil without using any kind gas-powered equipment such as a tiller, tractor, or harrow. So if you want to start a new garden area, but have no form of gas-powered equipment, add this Silage Tarp to that area. It works great when laid down for three to four weeks in the summertime or maybe up to six weeks in the wintertime. Then, just pull it up and go to planting vegetables in the garden area. Travis recommends to mow it down as low as you could then apply the silage tarp. If you are like Greg and have a longer existing garden spot that has high weed pressure these Silage tarps work great to suppress this weed seed bank. Another great benefit of Silage Tarps is it maintains the integrity of the garden soil. With the tendency of overworking our soils, this tarp method allows us to not overwork which maintains the proper tilth that we need to have for a successful vegetable garden.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Greg has a Tubtrug colander full of Jambalaya and some stragglers of Red Burgundy Okra. Both productive okra varieties, but Jambalaya is top-notch when it comes to maximum production in the vegetable garden. Travis brought some of Greg's favorite Brown Turkey Figs. He also has a Stonewall cucumber that was harvested off his Hortonova Trellis Netting. Growing on a trellis allows for higher yields and more growing space because vegetables are growing vertically in the garden. The guys also show off the different color Hoss Hats that we carry in Charcoal, Red, and Camo.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about what they learned from this growing season that they wouldn't like to do again and squash bug pressures during the Fall. Although they had a good garden season due to the dry weather they both found one thing that they learned to not do in the garden again. For Greg, he prefers not to grow southern peas in the garden again. He did well growing the peas, but he cannot control the Southern pea curculio. Travis agrees that he can't grow them as well. During late Fall and September, the squash bug pressures are probably the highest during the Fall months. Travis says to avoid even trying to grow any kind cucurbit vegetables during those months. The guys recommend planting any kind of cucurbits early in the garden to avoid those harsh squash bug pressures.<br /> Product of the Week<br /> <br /> Silage Tarp<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w1F_bihSw-g Greg and Travis clean 21:26 Row by Row Episode 60: Ultimate Taste Test Between Hybrid and Heirloom https://hosstools.com/taste-test-between-hybrid-heirloom/ Mon, 01 Jul 2019 13:03:39 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=50452 Hybrid vs. Heirloom When deciding between different hybrid and heirloom varieties to plant you should really weight out the benefits and flavor profiles that both varieties have to offer. More importantly, differentiate and decide which type of variety you prefer to plant in your personal garden. One major advantage that heirlooms have is they are open-pollinated meaning that the pollen is carried naturally through wind or pollinators. While hybrid varieties are hybridized meaning they have to be pollinated by human intervention to carry out the characteristics in the plant. Taste Testing Hybrid Tomato Varieties On last week's show, Greg had the opportunity to taste test some heirloom tomato varieties and rank them based on most productive flavors. The guys were both unsurprised that Sun Gold came out on top with the most flavor profile out of all the varieties tested. This week Travis is taste testing three different determinant hybrid tomato varieties. When discussing these varieties, Travis explains that Bella Rosa and Brickyard tend to be hardier than the Mountain Glory in his garden that is surrounded by commercial farming. According to Greg, the Mountain Glory does better in the northern cooler climates where the disease pressures are not as high like it is in the southern climates. The guys recommend testing out all these varieties to see which one works best for you because it is all based on climate temperatures and disease pressures in the area that you live in. The first tomato that Travis taste tested is the Brickyard which he says to be more acidic in flavor and compared it to a store-bought tomato. The Bella Rosa was next in the taste test which came out less acidic and more of a fruity flavor than the Brickyard. The last tomato, Travis tries is the Mountain Glory. He describes it has being less complex and plainer than the first two he tasted. Overall, the Bella Rosa came out on top with the taste testing with Brickyard and Mountain Glory close behind it. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, the guys discuss everything that is popping up and blooming in the garden. Greg has some succession planting sunflowers from his garden. With hardly any tend to them at all, his ProCut Orange sunflowers bloomed to the perfect size and left him very impressed. For easy and quick planting these ProCut sunflower varieties work like a dream in our garden seeder. Travis has some Ageratum Blue Horizon cut flowers to show off from his garden. This is his first time growing this variety and the native bees have been all over this type of cut flower variety. Travis has experienced the best pepper crop in several years. He has a Merlot Purple Bell Pepper that has great flavor and yields. However, the Bayonet is the leading bell pepper when it comes to maximum production. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about their planting schedule and can you still plant sunflowers in Ohio. To keep track of what Greg and Travis have going on in the garden it is best to watch all our YouTube videos when they come out. This will help you know what to plant and when to harvest crops in the garden if you live in the same growing zone (8a). However, they recommend getting a garden planner which is helpful for any growing zone that offers plant and row spacing as well. Greg says depending on what part of Ohio you live in if you get the ProCut Sunflowers in the garden before August 1st you should be in good shape. Product of the Week Tomato Varieties https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eT1YnooLf8c Hybrid vs. Heirloom When deciding between different hybrid and heirloom varieties to plant you should really weight out the benefits and flavor profiles that both varieties have to offer. More importantly, Hybrid vs. Heirloom<br /> When deciding between different hybrid and heirloom varieties to plant you should really weight out the benefits and flavor profiles that both varieties have to offer. More importantly, differentiate and decide which type of variety you prefer to plant in your personal garden. One major advantage that heirlooms have is they are open-pollinated meaning that the pollen is carried naturally through wind or pollinators. While hybrid varieties are hybridized meaning they have to be pollinated by human intervention to carry out the characteristics in the plant.<br /> Taste Testing Hybrid Tomato Varieties<br /> On last week's show, Greg had the opportunity to taste test some heirloom tomato varieties and rank them based on most productive flavors. The guys were both unsurprised that Sun Gold came out on top with the most flavor profile out of all the varieties tested. This week Travis is taste testing three different determinant hybrid tomato varieties. When discussing these varieties, Travis explains that Bella Rosa and Brickyard tend to be hardier than the Mountain Glory in his garden that is surrounded by commercial farming. According to Greg, the Mountain Glory does better in the northern cooler climates where the disease pressures are not as high like it is in the southern climates. The guys recommend testing out all these varieties to see which one works best for you because it is all based on climate temperatures and disease pressures in the area that you live in. The first tomato that Travis taste tested is the Brickyard which he says to be more acidic in flavor and compared it to a store-bought tomato. The Bella Rosa was next in the taste test which came out less acidic and more of a fruity flavor than the Brickyard. The last tomato, Travis tries is the Mountain Glory. He describes it has being less complex and plainer than the first two he tasted. Overall, the Bella Rosa came out on top with the taste testing with Brickyard and Mountain Glory close behind it.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, the guys discuss everything that is popping up and blooming in the garden. Greg has some succession planting sunflowers from his garden. With hardly any tend to them at all, his ProCut Orange sunflowers bloomed to the perfect size and left him very impressed. For easy and quick planting these ProCut sunflower varieties work like a dream in our garden seeder. Travis has some Ageratum Blue Horizon cut flowers to show off from his garden. This is his first time growing this variety and the native bees have been all over this type of cut flower variety. Travis has experienced the best pepper crop in several years. He has a Merlot Purple Bell Pepper that has great flavor and yields. However, the Bayonet is the leading bell pepper when it comes to maximum production.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about their planting schedule and can you still plant sunflowers in Ohio. To keep track of what Greg and Travis have going on in the garden it is best to watch all our YouTube videos when they come out. This will help you know what to plant and when to harvest crops in the garden if you live in the same growing zone (8a). However, they recommend getting a garden planner which is helpful for any growing zone that offers plant and row spacing as well. Greg says depending on what part of Ohio you live in if you get the ProCut Sunflowers in the garden before August 1st you should be in good shape.<br /> Product of the Week<br /> <br /> Tomato Varieties<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eT1YnooLf8c Greg and Travis clean 24:07 Row by Row Episode 59: Taste Testing Different Tomato Varieties in the Garden https://hosstools.com/taste-testing-different-tomato-varieties/ Fri, 21 Jun 2019 12:37:30 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=50135 Indeterminate/Heirloom Tomatoes Tomatoes are always a favorite and popular crop to grow in the garden. Whether they are heirloom/hybrid or determinate/indeterminate they all offer many different growing characteristics and flavors. The guys like to transplant their tomatoes in seed starting trays. Indeterminate tomato varieties are known to continue growing and producing all throughout the growing season. The heirloom varieties are described as your older varieties that have the same characteristics that have been passed down from generation to generation. These indeterminate tomatoes can be both heirloom and hybrid. Taste Testing Tomatoes On this week's show, Greg does a little taste testing and rates several different indeterminate tomatoes. To start off the taste testing the guys begin with the goldish/orange, Jubilee tomato which is an heirloom variety. The second variety he tries is the open-pollinated, Amish Paste variety. This is a great variety for canning and preserving after harvest. Another heirloom variety that Greg tried was the Mortgage Lifter tomato. The fourth taste test was an extremely flavorable hybrid variety, Sun Gold. The next variety is the Cherokee Purple that is an old heirloom that originated back to the Cherokee Native Americans in Tennessee. To finish up the taste testing, Travis has a little surprise for Greg. Overall, Greg ranked the Sun Gold as being the best tomato out of these different indeterminate varieties. The Sun Gold offers the best citrusy flavor out of any other tomato variety. According to Greg his least favorite one was the Mortgage Lifter variety. The guys both agree that this variety grows really nice size tomatoes, but they do not offer a lot of flavor. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Travis has some ProCut sunflowers that he harvested. These beautiful sunflower mixes were the Lemon, Orange, Red Lemon Bicolor, and Plum. Greg talks about planting some more sunflowers with the garden seeder. They guys also taste test a Beaver Dam Hot Pepper that is more sweet than hot. They agree that it has more of a sweet heat or citrusy heat, but not hot at all. Greg has some productive Blue Bayou and Cherokee Tan pumpkins growing in the garden. They guys talk about one thing in the garden that has left them pleasantly surprised thus far in the growing season. Travis recently added bees to his garden and he has been surprised at how much more squash and zucchini production he is getting since adding these pollinators. Greg is surprised at how well his Brickyard tomatoes are doing this growing season. The guys also mention a little bit about Silage Tarps which is a new product that will be on the website soon. Greg is currently doing a trial with one in his garden right now. Silage Tarps are a great companion to the cover crop system in your vegetable garden. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about the difference in bean varieties, pickled okra recipes, and what seasoning do they like to put on their potatoes. Travis says that whenever they discuss bean varieties they mainly talk about pole beans and bush beans. When talking about pole beans they should be grown on a trellis because they grow vertically and they work best in smaller garden areas. Greg likes to use the "Pickled Pantry" book to get some of his pickled okra recipes. The guys mention that the seasoning they love to use so much is called Cavender's Greek Seasoning. They like to use it to season many different vegetables in the garden and you should definitely try it out if you can get your hands on some. Product of the Week Hortonova Trellis Netting https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l6i1riyyQ-4&t=1290s Indeterminate/Heirloom Tomatoes Tomatoes are always a favorite and popular crop to grow in the garden. Whether they are heirloom/hybrid or determinate/indeterminate they all offer many different growing characteristics and flavors. Indeterminate/Heirloom Tomatoes<br /> Tomatoes are always a favorite and popular crop to grow in the garden. Whether they are heirloom/hybrid or determinate/indeterminate they all offer many different growing characteristics and flavors. The guys like to transplant their tomatoes in seed starting trays. Indeterminate tomato varieties are known to continue growing and producing all throughout the growing season. The heirloom varieties are described as your older varieties that have the same characteristics that have been passed down from generation to generation. These indeterminate tomatoes can be both heirloom and hybrid.<br /> Taste Testing Tomatoes<br /> On this week's show, Greg does a little taste testing and rates several different indeterminate tomatoes. To start off the taste testing the guys begin with the goldish/orange, Jubilee tomato which is an heirloom variety. The second variety he tries is the open-pollinated, Amish Paste variety. This is a great variety for canning and preserving after harvest. Another heirloom variety that Greg tried was the Mortgage Lifter tomato. The fourth taste test was an extremely flavorable hybrid variety, Sun Gold. The next variety is the Cherokee Purple that is an old heirloom that originated back to the Cherokee Native Americans in Tennessee. To finish up the taste testing, Travis has a little surprise for Greg. Overall, Greg ranked the Sun Gold as being the best tomato out of these different indeterminate varieties. The Sun Gold offers the best citrusy flavor out of any other tomato variety. According to Greg his least favorite one was the Mortgage Lifter variety. The guys both agree that this variety grows really nice size tomatoes, but they do not offer a lot of flavor.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Travis has some ProCut sunflowers that he harvested. These beautiful sunflower mixes were the Lemon, Orange, Red Lemon Bicolor, and Plum. Greg talks about planting some more sunflowers with the garden seeder. They guys also taste test a Beaver Dam Hot Pepper that is more sweet than hot. They agree that it has more of a sweet heat or citrusy heat, but not hot at all. Greg has some productive Blue Bayou and Cherokee Tan pumpkins growing in the garden. They guys talk about one thing in the garden that has left them pleasantly surprised thus far in the growing season. Travis recently added bees to his garden and he has been surprised at how much more squash and zucchini production he is getting since adding these pollinators. Greg is surprised at how well his Brickyard tomatoes are doing this growing season. The guys also mention a little bit about Silage Tarps which is a new product that will be on the website soon. Greg is currently doing a trial with one in his garden right now. Silage Tarps are a great companion to the cover crop system in your vegetable garden.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about the difference in bean varieties, pickled okra recipes, and what seasoning do they like to put on their potatoes. Travis says that whenever they discuss bean varieties they mainly talk about pole beans and bush beans. When talking about pole beans they should be grown on a trellis because they grow vertically and they work best in smaller garden areas. Greg likes to use the "Pickled Pantry" book to get some of his pickled okra recipes. The guys mention that the seasoning they love to use so much is called Cavender's Greek Seasoning. They like to use it to season many different vegetables in the garden and you should definitely try it out if you can get your hands on some.<br /> Product of the Week<br /> <br /> Hortonova Trellis Netting<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l6i1riyyQ-4&t=1290s Greg and Travis clean 26:59 Row by Row Episode 58: Tips for Growing Okra in the Garden https://hosstools.com/tips-growing-okra-garden/ Mon, 17 Jun 2019 13:30:37 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=49786 Okra Varieties Classified in the Malvaceae family, okra prefers warm-weather which makes it perfect for the summer growing season. The guys have tested several okra varieties over the years including Star of David, Cowhorn, Red Burgundy, Clemson Spineless, and Jambalaya. In their trials the Red Burgundy and Jambalaya varieties were the most productive. They do plan on adding more okra varieties in the future. These could include Candle Fire, Louisiana Velvet, Emerald and the Dwarf Green Long Pod okra. Growing Productive Okra The recommended row spacing for okra is 26 to 38 inches. Okra may be transplanted or direct-seeded. Rows should be spaced 28" to 36" apart, although the guys prefer the wider 3' spacing. Plant spacing along the row should be 8-12". Transplanting will require fewer seeds than direct-seeding. When transplanting, you can expect to use about 2 lbs of seed per acre. When direct-seeding, plant seeds 3-4" apart and thin to 8-12". This will usually require about 12-15 pounds of seed per acre. The preferred soil pH for okra is 5.8 to 6.5, which is slightly acidic. Okra prefers a balanced fertilizer at planting. Something like a 20-20-20 or 10-10-10 formulation would work well. The recommended amount is 600-800 pounds per acre, which equates to 13 lbs per 1,000 sq. ft. Aphids and ants can be a major pest issue on okra plants. If you are experiencing ants in your okra, you more than likely you have an aphid problem. Aphids produce honeydew which attracts ants to okra crops. Also, okra is susceptible to parasitic nematode damage. To reduce nematode issues, practice proper crop rotation and plant cover crops like Sunn Hemp, Sorghum Sudangrass, or Mustard. Okra is commercially harvested based on three pod-length classifications: Fancy, Choice, and Jumbo. Fancy pods are around 3.5 inches long, Choice pods are 3.5 to 4.5 inches long, and Jumbo pods are over 4.5 inches long. Fancy and Choice okra pods must be harvested daily to prevent pods from getting too large. Okra plants may be pruned as they are harvested. This will make the area cleaner and easier to harvest in the future. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Travis discusses his tomato struggles this year. It was a rough start, but he now has them producing well. The guys perform a taste test two heirloom varieties. They try the Cherokee Purple and the Jubilee varieties. The Cherokee Purple is a dark red, almost purple tomato, while the Jubilee is a yellow to orange tomato. They discuss the primary differences between determinate and indeterminate tomato varieties. Indeterminate tomato varieties will have a slow, steady production over a long period of time. Determinate tomato varieties will produce more tomatoes in a short window. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about planting fall corn and lowering soil pH. Travis explains that he likes to plant fall sweet corn anywhere from late August to mid-September. If you live in zone 7A, Travis suggests planting at the end of July to early August. It is a good idea to also plant the corn on drip tape to make sure it has plenty of water in the late summer temperatures. Greg says it is easy to raise soil pH, but can be really difficult to lower it. The only option for lowering soil pH is to use elemental sulfur. It is best to always perform a soil test before adding lime to elevate soil pH levels. This will ensure that you don't add too much and over-adjust the pH. Products Mentioned in the Show Hortonova Trellis Netting Spinosad Garden Insect Spray https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QMy7Adn2pnA&t=256s Okra Varieties Classified in the Malvaceae family, okra prefers warm-weather which makes it perfect for the summer growing season. The guys have tested several okra varieties over the years including Star of David, Cowhorn, Red Burgundy, Okra Varieties<br /> Classified in the Malvaceae family, okra prefers warm-weather which makes it perfect for the summer growing season. The guys have tested several okra varieties over the years including Star of David, Cowhorn, Red Burgundy, Clemson Spineless, and Jambalaya. In their trials the Red Burgundy and Jambalaya varieties were the most productive. They do plan on adding more okra varieties in the future. These could include Candle Fire, Louisiana Velvet, Emerald and the Dwarf Green Long Pod okra.<br /> Growing Productive Okra<br /> The recommended row spacing for okra is 26 to 38 inches. Okra may be transplanted or direct-seeded. Rows should be spaced 28" to 36" apart, although the guys prefer the wider 3' spacing. Plant spacing along the row should be 8-12". Transplanting will require fewer seeds than direct-seeding. When transplanting, you can expect to use about 2 lbs of seed per acre. When direct-seeding, plant seeds 3-4" apart and thin to 8-12". This will usually require about 12-15 pounds of seed per acre.<br /> <br /> The preferred soil pH for okra is 5.8 to 6.5, which is slightly acidic. Okra prefers a balanced fertilizer at planting. Something like a 20-20-20 or 10-10-10 formulation would work well. The recommended amount is 600-800 pounds per acre, which equates to 13 lbs per 1,000 sq. ft.<br /> <br /> Aphids and ants can be a major pest issue on okra plants. If you are experiencing ants in your okra, you more than likely you have an aphid problem. Aphids produce honeydew which attracts ants to okra crops. Also, okra is susceptible to parasitic nematode damage. To reduce nematode issues, practice proper crop rotation and plant cover crops like Sunn Hemp, Sorghum Sudangrass, or Mustard.<br /> <br /> Okra is commercially harvested based on three pod-length classifications: Fancy, Choice, and Jumbo. Fancy pods are around 3.5 inches long, Choice pods are 3.5 to 4.5 inches long, and Jumbo pods are over 4.5 inches long. Fancy and Choice okra pods must be harvested daily to prevent pods from getting too large. Okra plants may be pruned as they are harvested. This will make the area cleaner and easier to harvest in the future.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Travis discusses his tomato struggles this year. It was a rough start, but he now has them producing well. The guys perform a taste test two heirloom varieties. They try the Cherokee Purple and the Jubilee varieties. The Cherokee Purple is a dark red, almost purple tomato, while the Jubilee is a yellow to orange tomato. They discuss the primary differences between determinate and indeterminate tomato varieties. Indeterminate tomato varieties will have a slow, steady production over a long period of time. Determinate tomato varieties will produce more tomatoes in a short window.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about planting fall corn and lowering soil pH. Travis explains that he likes to plant fall sweet corn anywhere from late August to mid-September. If you live in zone 7A, Travis suggests planting at the end of July to early August. It is a good idea to also plant the corn on drip tape to make sure it has plenty of water in the late summer temperatures. Greg says it is easy to raise soil pH, but can be really difficult to lower it. The only option for lowering soil pH is to use elemental sulfur. It is best to always perform a soil test before adding lime to elevate soil pH levels. This will ensure that you don't add too much and over-adjust the pH.<br /> Products Mentioned in the Show<br /> <br /> Hortonova Trellis Netting<br /> Spinosad Garden Insect Spray<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QMy7Adn2pnA&t=256s Greg and Travis clean 35:04 Row by Row Episode 57: Growing Loads of Sweet Potatoes in Your Garden https://hosstools.com/growing-loads-sweet-potatoes-garden/ Wed, 12 Jun 2019 20:32:28 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=49759 Sweet Potato Planting There are over 6,500 varieties of sweet potatoes in the world. Sweet potatoes are a member of the Morning Glory family and will typically mature in 90 to 120 days. Unlike Irish potatoes which prefer cooler soils, sweet potatoes are a heat-loving crop that grows well throughout the summer. Sweet potatoes are usually grown from slips, which are sprouts that are plucked from the sweet potato. Growing Sweet Potatoes The guys have tried several varieties over the years including Beauregard, Centennial and Covington. Thus far the Covington variety has been the most productive one for them. This year they will be growing the Georgia Jet which was recommended to them by their friends at Steele Plant Company. Sweet potatoes prefer sandy or loamy soils that are well-drained and not too rich in nitrogen. The optimal pH for growing sweet potatoes is between 5.8 to 6.2. When planting this crop, you should avoid growing them in newly-established gardens, especially areas that were covered in grass. They will grow better in well-established garden plots that have been farmed for several years. It is also important to avoid growing sweet potatoes in garden areas where you experience parasitic nematode problems. The three major nutrient requirements for sweet potatoes are nitrogen, phosphate, and lots of potassium. The recommended rate for nitrogen and phosphorous is 60 lbs per acre or 1.4 lbs per 1,000 square feet. The recommended potassium rate is much higher at 200 lbs per acre or 4.5 lbs per square feet. Nutrient applications are recommended per cultivation. At the first cultivation, you should apply all of the recommended phosphorous (1.4 lbs per 1,000 sq. ft.) and half of the recommended potassium (2.25 lbs per 1,000 sq. ft.). The other half of the recommended potassium (2.25 lbs per 1,000 sq. ft.) should be applied before the second cultivation. Nitrogen (1.4 lbs per 1,000 sq. ft.) should be applied in the third and final cultivation. This is the ideal fertilization cycle for sweet potatoes. Sweet potatoes need adequate water when slips are young and roots are establishing. Drip tape can work great for this, as long as you don't overwater when plants are older. Hilling sweet potatoes will help to reduce weed pressure along the row, but doesn't necessarily increase harvests. You can also prune the vines as they grow to keep the area more neatly managed. Steele Plant Company Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Travis shows new variety of lettuce called Calshot. This is a red romaine variety which is available in pelleted seed form. Even with the dry and humid weather the guys have experienced lately, they were able to salvage a couple of heads. However, the flowers in the garden have been loving the warm weather. Travis has  been harvesting many of his Benary Giant Zinnias, including the lime, white, and the mixed varieties. Greg provides an update on his honey select sweet corn that Travis wanted him to grow this year. Greg explains that it is much sweeter than the varieties he grew previously. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about nematodes and buckwheat. Travis explains that nematodes are microscopic roundworms and they are present in every type of soil. They can damage crops by destroying the root systems. You can control nematodes by growing cover crops like Sorghum Sudangrass and Sunn Hemp. Greg says buckwheat attracts pollinators, especially bees, to your garden. Each cover crop can have a slightly different benefit and each one has a different maturity date. When selecting a warm-season cover crop, one should consider the window in which they expect this crop to grow and mature. Products Mentioned in the Show Micro-Boost https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XXs83GcOyRM Sweet Potato Planting There are over 6,500 varieties of sweet potatoes in the world. Sweet potatoes are a member of the Morning Glory family and will typically mature in 90 to 120 days. Unlike Irish potatoes which prefer cooler soils, Sweet Potato Planting<br /> There are over 6,500 varieties of sweet potatoes in the world. Sweet potatoes are a member of the Morning Glory family and will typically mature in 90 to 120 days. Unlike Irish potatoes which prefer cooler soils, sweet potatoes are a heat-loving crop that grows well throughout the summer. Sweet potatoes are usually grown from slips, which are sprouts that are plucked from the sweet potato.<br /> Growing Sweet Potatoes<br /> The guys have tried several varieties over the years including Beauregard, Centennial and Covington. Thus far the Covington variety has been the most productive one for them. This year they will be growing the Georgia Jet which was recommended to them by their friends at Steele Plant Company. Sweet potatoes prefer sandy or loamy soils that are well-drained and not too rich in nitrogen. The optimal pH for growing sweet potatoes is between 5.8 to 6.2. When planting this crop, you should avoid growing them in newly-established gardens, especially areas that were covered in grass. They will grow better in well-established garden plots that have been farmed for several years. It is also important to avoid growing sweet potatoes in garden areas where you experience parasitic nematode problems.<br /> <br /> The three major nutrient requirements for sweet potatoes are nitrogen, phosphate, and lots of potassium. The recommended rate for nitrogen and phosphorous is 60 lbs per acre or 1.4 lbs per 1,000 square feet. The recommended potassium rate is much higher at 200 lbs per acre or 4.5 lbs per square feet.<br /> <br /> Nutrient applications are recommended per cultivation. At the first cultivation, you should apply all of the recommended phosphorous (1.4 lbs per 1,000 sq. ft.) and half of the recommended potassium (2.25 lbs per 1,000 sq. ft.). The other half of the recommended potassium (2.25 lbs per 1,000 sq. ft.) should be applied before the second cultivation. Nitrogen (1.4 lbs per 1,000 sq. ft.) should be applied in the third and final cultivation. This is the ideal fertilization cycle for sweet potatoes.<br /> <br /> Sweet potatoes need adequate water when slips are young and roots are establishing. Drip tape can work great for this, as long as you don't overwater when plants are older. Hilling sweet potatoes will help to reduce weed pressure along the row, but doesn't necessarily increase harvests. You can also prune the vines as they grow to keep the area more neatly managed.<br /> <br /> Steele Plant Company<br /> <br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Travis shows new variety of lettuce called Calshot. This is a red romaine variety which is available in pelleted seed form. Even with the dry and humid weather the guys have experienced lately, they were able to salvage a couple of heads. However, the flowers in the garden have been loving the warm weather. Travis has  been harvesting many of his Benary Giant Zinnias, including the lime, white, and the mixed varieties. Greg provides an update on his honey select sweet corn that Travis wanted him to grow this year. Greg explains that it is much sweeter than the varieties he grew previously.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about nematodes and buckwheat. Travis explains that nematodes are microscopic roundworms and they are present in every type of soil. They can damage crops by destroying the root systems. You can control nematodes by growing cover crops like Sorghum Sudangrass and Sunn Hemp. Greg says buckwheat attracts pollinators, especially bees, to your garden. Each cover crop can have a slightly different benefit and each one has a different maturity date. When selecting a warm-season cover crop, one should consider the window in which they expect this crop to grow and mature.<br /> Products Mentioned in the Show<br /> <br /> Micro-Boost<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XXs83GcOyRM Greg and Travis clean 31:49 Row by Row Episode 56: Improve Your Garden with Warm-Weather Cover Crops https://hosstools.com/improve-garden-warm-weather-cover-crops/ Wed, 12 Jun 2019 18:34:49 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=49708 Warm-Weather Cover Crops Growing cover crops can be just as important as growing vegetable crops in the garden. Cover crops will restore your garden soils by increasing organic matter and feeding the soil biology. Warm weather cover crops are a great option during the warmer months when other vegetable crops may not grow as well. Sorghum Sudangrass Sorghum Sudangrass is monocot that contains a fibrous root system similar to corn. Sorghum Sudangrass will aerate and provide a significant amount of biomass for your soil. This cover crop is taller compared to other warm-season cover crops, and looks much like corn. It also provides a solid ground cover which will outcompete weeds and reduce further weed pressure. It can be broadcast or easily direct-seeded with our Hoss Garden Seeder. Brown Top Millet Brown Top Millet is another monocot, warm-season cover crop that works great to prevent soil erosion and suppress weeds. Many people like to use this cover crop as a livestock forage. Others will use it to create feeding plots for doves and other wildlife. Much like Sorghum Sudangrass, it is a taller cover crop and performs very well in the heat. It usually matures in 60 to 70 days. Buckwheat Buckwheat is a dicot, warm-season cover crop with a taproot system. It is the fastest-maturing warm-weather cover crops that we offer. Buckwheat will mature in four to six weeks. This crop is great for attracting pollinators such as bees because they absolutely adore this crop. It is an ideal plant to scavenge the phosphorus in the soil as well. Sunn Hemp Another dicot that adapts well in hot and dry climates is Sunn Hemp. This is also a fast-growing crop that only takes eight to twelve weeks to mature. Sunn Hemp works well on overfarmed soils like sandy soils that are nutrient-poor. It is also can be a nitrogen fixer and can be used to suppress parasitic nematode populations in the soil. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, the guys discuss the dry and humid weather they've experienced lately. Travis has tomatoes, winter squash, and cucumbers planted on drip tape, but cannot seem to cool them off from the heat. Much to his disliking, he has had to use an overhead sprinkler on his tomatoes and winter squash to cool the plants during the heat of the day. However, the Jambalaya and Red Burgundy okra are growing perfect in this warm weather. Another heat tolerant crop is the Tiger Collards. The guys have been harvesting quite a few of these lately. Greg has some Honey Select sweet corn that is almost ready to harvest. He explains that the brown silks are the primary indication of maturity with sweet corn. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about dry storage vegetables and transplanting sweet corn. Their Irish potatoes and Texas Legend onions will store for four to five months. On average, winter squash and spaghetti squash will last about six months. Seminole pumpkins will last about a year, making them one of the longest-storing crops. In summary, many of the dry storage vegetables will store for several weeks if given a dry area with good airflow and shade. Greg explains that he has transplanted sweet corn in the past, but it may be a little more difficult to transplant than crops like okra, tomatoes, and peppers. You can transplant sweet corn, it will just be more time-consuming. Products Mentioned in the Show Seminole Pumpkins https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AI-ObAfhnQY Warm-Weather Cover Crops Growing cover crops can be just as important as growing vegetable crops in the garden. Cover crops will restore your garden soils by increasing organic matter and feeding the soil biology. Warm-Weather Cover Crops<br /> Growing cover crops can be just as important as growing vegetable crops in the garden. Cover crops will restore your garden soils by increasing organic matter and feeding the soil biology. Warm weather cover crops are a great option during the warmer months when other vegetable crops may not grow as well.<br /> Sorghum Sudangrass<br /> Sorghum Sudangrass is monocot that contains a fibrous root system similar to corn. Sorghum Sudangrass will aerate and provide a significant amount of biomass for your soil. This cover crop is taller compared to other warm-season cover crops, and looks much like corn. It also provides a solid ground cover which will outcompete weeds and reduce further weed pressure. It can be broadcast or easily direct-seeded with our Hoss Garden Seeder.<br /> Brown Top Millet<br /> Brown Top Millet is another monocot, warm-season cover crop that works great to prevent soil erosion and suppress weeds. Many people like to use this cover crop as a livestock forage. Others will use it to create feeding plots for doves and other wildlife. Much like Sorghum Sudangrass, it is a taller cover crop and performs very well in the heat. It usually matures in 60 to 70 days.<br /> Buckwheat<br /> Buckwheat is a dicot, warm-season cover crop with a taproot system. It is the fastest-maturing warm-weather cover crops that we offer. Buckwheat will mature in four to six weeks. This crop is great for attracting pollinators such as bees because they absolutely adore this crop. It is an ideal plant to scavenge the phosphorus in the soil as well.<br /> Sunn Hemp<br /> Another dicot that adapts well in hot and dry climates is Sunn Hemp. This is also a fast-growing crop that only takes eight to twelve weeks to mature. Sunn Hemp works well on overfarmed soils like sandy soils that are nutrient-poor. It is also can be a nitrogen fixer and can be used to suppress parasitic nematode populations in the soil.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, the guys discuss the dry and humid weather they've experienced lately. Travis has tomatoes, winter squash, and cucumbers planted on drip tape, but cannot seem to cool them off from the heat. Much to his disliking, he has had to use an overhead sprinkler on his tomatoes and winter squash to cool the plants during the heat of the day. However, the Jambalaya and Red Burgundy okra are growing perfect in this warm weather. Another heat tolerant crop is the Tiger Collards. The guys have been harvesting quite a few of these lately. Greg has some Honey Select sweet corn that is almost ready to harvest. He explains that the brown silks are the primary indication of maturity with sweet corn.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about dry storage vegetables and transplanting sweet corn. Their Irish potatoes and Texas Legend onions will store for four to five months. On average, winter squash and spaghetti squash will last about six months. Seminole pumpkins will last about a year, making them one of the longest-storing crops. In summary, many of the dry storage vegetables will store for several weeks if given a dry area with good airflow and shade. Greg explains that he has transplanted sweet corn in the past, but it may be a little more difficult to transplant than crops like okra, tomatoes, and peppers. You can transplant sweet corn, it will just be more time-consuming.<br /> Products Mentioned in the Show<br /> <br /> Seminole Pumpkins<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AI-ObAfhnQY Greg and Travis clean 31:45 Row by Row Episode 55: The Best Storage Tips for Fresh Garden Vegetables https://hosstools.com/best-storage-tips-garden-vegetables/ Tue, 11 Jun 2019 19:11:55 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=49696 Storing Vegetable Gardens There are many ways to store your vegetable crops once they're harvested from the vegetable garden. Whether you store them in the barn or under the carport, creating a storage area for your vegetable crops is important. Aspects like good airflow, shade, and temperature should be considered to keep your crops stored for their maximal lifespan. Dry vs. Cold Storage Dry: When it comes to storing crops like onions, garlic, shallots, winter squash, Irish and sweet potatoes, you want to make sure they are in an area that has good airflow and that is shaded and dry. Here in the South, most people have pole barns which are open-air, covered barns. For these areas, many people build a storage rack with hardware cloth or chicken wire to place their dry storage vegetables. Cold: Other vegetable crops should be stored in a cool environment to preserve their longevity. These would include crops like greens, lettuce, squash, cucumbers, peppers, okra and many others. In addition to having a cooler temperature, airflow is also important. Travis prefers to use plastic produce bags, much like you would find at the grocery store, to store his cool-storage crops. He places the vegetables in the bag, ties a knot in the top and pokes a few holes in the top for airflow. This creates a similar environment to a plastic clam shell, which is also great for storing cold vegetables. Greg explains that it's best to not wash vegetables until they are ready to be prepared or consumed. This will decrease the risk of introducing bacteria and spoilage. He also suggests washing squash and cucumbers in a dilution of baking soda as this will help to preserve them longer. Once washed with the baking soda solution, allow them to air dry and then place in cold storage. If allowed to dry, many vegetables like carrots, squash and cucumbers will store for up to two weeks in the fridge. Tomatoes are a crop that doesn't fall into either of the above categories. When storing tomatoes, the guys like to pick them during the pink stage. They will then lay the fruits on a towel-covered table under the carport. It is important to lay them in a single layer to prevent spoilage. The carport will provide shade and keep them shaded from direct sunlight, but will not provide a drastic temperature change while they continue to ripen. As soon as they ripen, they will take them inside and lay them on a table in the cooler, indoor climate. The ideal temperature for tomatoes is 60 degrees, so take them inside where it is 68-70 degrees. Here they will store nicely and be ready to eat. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, the guys discuss how they have both been experiencing perfect gardening weather recently. As a result, all the crops in the garden have been growing nicely. Greg has some indeterminate Sun Gold tomatoes that have been really productive this year. Initially these fruits will be green on the vine, but they will quickly turn yellow to orange. They like to harvest them at the yellow to orange stage as that seems to provide the peak flavor. Travis has dug all of his potatoes except his German butterballs, which have a couple more weeks before harvesting. This is Greg's first year growing shallots and he is growing three different varieties. His favorite variety that he grew is the Banana shallot. Greg prefers to use shallots for cooking instead of eating them raw like his he does with onions. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about drip irrigation filter setups, watermelon fertilization and nutgrass problems. Travis suggests using a separate filter/regulator setup for each subplot in the vegetable garden. This is much easier than trying to move the filter/regulator setup each time you water a different plot. Greg explains that watermelons require about 120 units of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium per acre. Watermelons need a well-balanced fertilizer to help with de... Storing Vegetable Gardens There are many ways to store your vegetable crops once they're harvested from the vegetable garden. Whether you store them in the barn or under the carport, creating a storage area for your vegetable crops is important. Storing Vegetable Gardens<br /> There are many ways to store your vegetable crops once they're harvested from the vegetable garden. Whether you store them in the barn or under the carport, creating a storage area for your vegetable crops is important. Aspects like good airflow, shade, and temperature should be considered to keep your crops stored for their maximal lifespan.<br /> Dry vs. Cold Storage<br /> Dry: When it comes to storing crops like onions, garlic, shallots, winter squash, Irish and sweet potatoes, you want to make sure they are in an area that has good airflow and that is shaded and dry. Here in the South, most people have pole barns which are open-air, covered barns. For these areas, many people build a storage rack with hardware cloth or chicken wire to place their dry storage vegetables.<br /> <br /> Cold: Other vegetable crops should be stored in a cool environment to preserve their longevity. These would include crops like greens, lettuce, squash, cucumbers, peppers, okra and many others. In addition to having a cooler temperature, airflow is also important. Travis prefers to use plastic produce bags, much like you would find at the grocery store, to store his cool-storage crops. He places the vegetables in the bag, ties a knot in the top and pokes a few holes in the top for airflow. This creates a similar environment to a plastic clam shell, which is also great for storing cold vegetables. Greg explains that it's best to not wash vegetables until they are ready to be prepared or consumed. This will decrease the risk of introducing bacteria and spoilage. He also suggests washing squash and cucumbers in a dilution of baking soda as this will help to preserve them longer. Once washed with the baking soda solution, allow them to air dry and then place in cold storage. If allowed to dry, many vegetables like carrots, squash and cucumbers will store for up to two weeks in the fridge.<br /> <br /> Tomatoes are a crop that doesn't fall into either of the above categories. When storing tomatoes, the guys like to pick them during the pink stage. They will then lay the fruits on a towel-covered table under the carport. It is important to lay them in a single layer to prevent spoilage. The carport will provide shade and keep them shaded from direct sunlight, but will not provide a drastic temperature change while they continue to ripen. As soon as they ripen, they will take them inside and lay them on a table in the cooler, indoor climate. The ideal temperature for tomatoes is 60 degrees, so take them inside where it is 68-70 degrees. Here they will store nicely and be ready to eat.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, the guys discuss how they have both been experiencing perfect gardening weather recently. As a result, all the crops in the garden have been growing nicely. Greg has some indeterminate Sun Gold tomatoes that have been really productive this year. Initially these fruits will be green on the vine, but they will quickly turn yellow to orange. They like to harvest them at the yellow to orange stage as that seems to provide the peak flavor. Travis has dug all of his potatoes except his German butterballs, which have a couple more weeks before harvesting. This is Greg's first year growing shallots and he is growing three different varieties. His favorite variety that he grew is the Banana shallot. Greg prefers to use shallots for cooking instead of eating them raw like his he does with onions.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about drip irrigation filter setups, watermelon fertilization and nutgrass problems. Travis suggests using a separate filter/regulator setup for each subplot in the vegetable garden. This is much easier than trying to move the filter/regulator setup each time you water a different plot. Greg explains that watermelons require about 120 units of nitrogen, phosphorus, Greg and Travis clean 34:02 Row by Row Episode 54: Productive Crops for the Summer Garden https://hosstools.com/productive-crops-summer-garden/ Tue, 11 Jun 2019 15:33:37 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=49684 Improving Your Summer Garden Not sure what to plant in the summer garden? Instead of allowing the vegetable garden to become covered with grass and weeds, grow heat-loving summer crops and keep the garden healthy for fall plantings. A summer garden is a great way to include succession planting and crop rotation. A solid crop rotation will help to promote soil health, plant health and reduce insect/disease pressure. Succession Planting & Crop Rotation During the fall and winter seasons, crops like lettuce, beets, and brassicas such as kohlrabi or bok choi are excellent for crop rotations because they all have similar dates to maturity. This is a great three crop rotation for the fall, winter and spring garden. This rotation will provide plenty of food in the cooler months if succession planted properly. To have successful cool weather crop rotations, you should consider choosing crops that require the same amount of time to grow. Succession planting in late spring and early summer is a great way to extend the harvest into the warmer months. We suggest succession planting squash, cucumbers and okra to get multiple crops within a given spring/summer period. We usually plant okra three to four times from spring through fall. This will ensure that we always have productive plants in the garden. As older plants become taller and produce less, we will always have younger plants that are starting to heavily produce. Sweet potatoes are also a great heat-loving summer crop that can be used to follow several other warm-season crops. We like to plant sweet potatoes behind our Irish potatoes or onions. Because they're in different families, we can follow either of those crops with sweet potatoes in late spring/early summer. We usually plant sweet potatoes in late May to early June, but they may be planted as late as August in warmer climates. We plant slips from Steele Plant Company in Gleason, TN. Warm-weather cover crops are another great option for summer plantings. These would include buckwheat, sorghum sudangrass, sunn hemp and brown top millet. Steele Plant Company: https://www.sweetpotatoplant.com/ Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Travis brought some Sunburst patty pan squash and explains his preferred method of preparing and cooking them. This is Greg's first year growing Rattlesnake pole beans and he has been surprised by the shape of the beans. They are not as flat as he thought they would be. For an heirloom variety, they are very productive and easy to grow. It has been a month since Travis has transplanted his peppers and they are not doing good. To fix resolve that issue, he decided to put some Epsom salt, some Gypsum to prevent blossom end rot and soil drench with Micro-Boost. After adding those elements to the peppers they are doing great now. Greg's Honey Select corn is almost ready to harvest, while Travis' Incredible Sweet Corn is growing fast but not quite ready to harvest. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about injecting micronutrients and spraying tomatoes for pests. Travis uses the Micro-Boost in his EZ-FLO Fertilizer Injector. The recommended rate is 1/4 cup per thousand square feet. For his garden, he adds two cups to the 2 gallon injector per injection. The Micro-Boost supplement may be mixed with any other fertilizer like 20-20-20, Chilean Nitrate or Liquid-Fish. Greg mentions that he does not spray his tomato plants while growing them in the greenhouse. But he does begin a spray program as soon as he transplants them into the vegetable garden. As soon as those transplants make contact with outside, non-sterile soil, it is a good idea to start a pest control program. Products Mentioned in the Show Micro-Boost Chilean Nitrate https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G71zihfmMeY&t=667s Improving Your Summer Garden Not sure what to plant in the summer garden? Instead of allowing the vegetable garden to become covered with grass and weeds, grow heat-loving summer crops and keep the garden healthy for fall plantings. Improving Your Summer Garden<br /> Not sure what to plant in the summer garden? Instead of allowing the vegetable garden to become covered with grass and weeds, grow heat-loving summer crops and keep the garden healthy for fall plantings. A summer garden is a great way to include succession planting and crop rotation. A solid crop rotation will help to promote soil health, plant health and reduce insect/disease pressure.<br /> Succession Planting & Crop Rotation<br /> During the fall and winter seasons, crops like lettuce, beets, and brassicas such as kohlrabi or bok choi are excellent for crop rotations because they all have similar dates to maturity. This is a great three crop rotation for the fall, winter and spring garden. This rotation will provide plenty of food in the cooler months if succession planted properly. To have successful cool weather crop rotations, you should consider choosing crops that require the same amount of time to grow. Succession planting in late spring and early summer is a great way to extend the harvest into the warmer months. We suggest succession planting squash, cucumbers and okra to get multiple crops within a given spring/summer period. We usually plant okra three to four times from spring through fall. This will ensure that we always have productive plants in the garden. As older plants become taller and produce less, we will always have younger plants that are starting to heavily produce.<br /> <br /> Sweet potatoes are also a great heat-loving summer crop that can be used to follow several other warm-season crops. We like to plant sweet potatoes behind our Irish potatoes or onions. Because they're in different families, we can follow either of those crops with sweet potatoes in late spring/early summer. We usually plant sweet potatoes in late May to early June, but they may be planted as late as August in warmer climates. We plant slips from Steele Plant Company in Gleason, TN. Warm-weather cover crops are another great option for summer plantings. These would include buckwheat, sorghum sudangrass, sunn hemp and brown top millet.<br /> <br /> Steele Plant Company: https://www.sweetpotatoplant.com/<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Travis brought some Sunburst patty pan squash and explains his preferred method of preparing and cooking them. This is Greg's first year growing Rattlesnake pole beans and he has been surprised by the shape of the beans. They are not as flat as he thought they would be. For an heirloom variety, they are very productive and easy to grow. It has been a month since Travis has transplanted his peppers and they are not doing good. To fix resolve that issue, he decided to put some Epsom salt, some Gypsum to prevent blossom end rot and soil drench with Micro-Boost. After adding those elements to the peppers they are doing great now. Greg's Honey Select corn is almost ready to harvest, while Travis' Incredible Sweet Corn is growing fast but not quite ready to harvest.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about injecting micronutrients and spraying tomatoes for pests. Travis uses the Micro-Boost in his EZ-FLO Fertilizer Injector. The recommended rate is 1/4 cup per thousand square feet. For his garden, he adds two cups to the 2 gallon injector per injection. The Micro-Boost supplement may be mixed with any other fertilizer like 20-20-20, Chilean Nitrate or Liquid-Fish. Greg mentions that he does not spray his tomato plants while growing them in the greenhouse. But he does begin a spray program as soon as he transplants them into the vegetable garden. As soon as those transplants make contact with outside, non-sterile soil, it is a good idea to start a pest control program.<br /> Products Mentioned in the Show<br /> <br /> Micro-Boost<br /> Chilean Nitrate<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G71zihfmMeY&t=667s Greg and Travis clean 28:29 Row by Row Episode 53: Organic Pest Control Solutions for the Garden https://hosstools.com/organic-pest-control-solutions-garden/ Tue, 11 Jun 2019 12:37:22 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=49643 How Can We Control Pests? We cannot always expect to fully eradicate pests, but we can control them in our vegetable gardens. By eliminating larval and younger individuals of the insect populations, we can break that life cycle and prevent further reproductively mature adults from being added to the population. It is also important to only plant certain crops when success can be expected. If pest pressure is extremely high during a given portion of the year, don't try to grow certain susceptible crops during that time. It can be different for everyone depending on your climate and local biology. Organic & All-Natural Pest Controls Insecticides: The most popular organic insecticide is Neem Oil, which will work best on insects in the nymph or immature stages. They even use Neem Oil in conventional farming because insects do not build a resistance to it. Another great organic insecticide is Pyrethrin, which is a contact insecticide. This means that it will kill whatever it touches. Because of this, it should be sprayed or applied late in the evening when the pollinators have gone to bed. Our Take Down Garden Spray includes pyrethrin and canola oil for a more residual control. The Take Down Garden Spray is not OMRI certified because the canola oil is not organically sourced. However, our Bug Buster also has pyrethrin as the active ingredient and it is OMRI registered. Horticultural Oil is a great option for controlling insects on fruit trees. Use it before bud break to help control insects that can attack any type of fruit trees. Our Fruit Tree Spray is a combination of both Neem Oil and Pyrethrin, which has a synergistic effect. All these products are concentrated and they will help control any of your soft-bodied insects. If you have any problems with worms or caterpillars in your cucumbers, you should definitely use B.t. B.t. is a naturally occurring bacteria and will kill the worms when they try to eat a plant that has been sprayed with it. This will break the pest cycle and prevent those larval forms from becoming reproductively mature adults. Spinosad is another treatment for worms, and it is a little more powerful than B.t. Spinosad is a naturally fermented product that can kill an insect either by contact or ingestion. For slugs and snails, we have a product called Sluggo, which is spinosad in a pelleted granular form. Sluggo works as a bait for slugs and snails in the vegetable garden. Fungicides: An OMRI registered option like our Complete Disease Control can be used for your fungal problems in the vegetable garden. You can use it either by soil drench or foliar spray as a protectant. When used as a soil drench, it can help with some of your soil-borne diseases. When used as a foliar spray, it covers the plant and protects it from disease pores. A widely used agricultural fungicide, Liquid Cop is great for controlling powdery mildew, downy mildew, and blight issues. Used especially for powdery and downy mildew, Bi-Carb is a great product to protect against those mildews on roses, vegetables, fruit trees, and ornamentals. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Greg brought some of his Calypso Cumcumbers, which is a hybrid pickling variety that is really productive in the vegetable garden. The guys taste test and compare the Calypso and Lemon cucumbers. Greg definitely recommends growing the Lemon Cucumbers in your garden. Travis talks about one of the most productive crops in the entire vegetable garden -- Tiger Collards. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about their relation and their Hoss seed selection process. They also provide information on succession planting and vertical growing. Yes, Greg and Travis are related but they are not brothers. They choose seed varieties based on what they have tried and been recommended by seed and variety experts. They are always looking to provide new seeds and try new varieties that are easy for the... How Can We Control Pests? We cannot always expect to fully eradicate pests, but we can control them in our vegetable gardens. By eliminating larval and younger individuals of the insect populations, we can break that life cycle and prevent further rep... How Can We Control Pests?<br /> We cannot always expect to fully eradicate pests, but we can control them in our vegetable gardens. By eliminating larval and younger individuals of the insect populations, we can break that life cycle and prevent further reproductively mature adults from being added to the population. It is also important to only plant certain crops when success can be expected. If pest pressure is extremely high during a given portion of the year, don't try to grow certain susceptible crops during that time. It can be different for everyone depending on your climate and local biology.<br /> Organic & All-Natural Pest Controls<br /> Insecticides:<br /> <br /> The most popular organic insecticide is Neem Oil, which will work best on insects in the nymph or immature stages. They even use Neem Oil in conventional farming because insects do not build a resistance to it. Another great organic insecticide is Pyrethrin, which is a contact insecticide. This means that it will kill whatever it touches. Because of this, it should be sprayed or applied late in the evening when the pollinators have gone to bed. Our Take Down Garden Spray includes pyrethrin and canola oil for a more residual control. The Take Down Garden Spray is not OMRI certified because the canola oil is not organically sourced. However, our Bug Buster also has pyrethrin as the active ingredient and it is OMRI registered. Horticultural Oil is a great option for controlling insects on fruit trees. Use it before bud break to help control insects that can attack any type of fruit trees. Our Fruit Tree Spray is a combination of both Neem Oil and Pyrethrin, which has a synergistic effect. All these products are concentrated and they will help control any of your soft-bodied insects. If you have any problems with worms or caterpillars in your cucumbers, you should definitely use B.t. B.t. is a naturally occurring bacteria and will kill the worms when they try to eat a plant that has been sprayed with it. This will break the pest cycle and prevent those larval forms from becoming reproductively mature adults. Spinosad is another treatment for worms, and it is a little more powerful than B.t. Spinosad is a naturally fermented product that can kill an insect either by contact or ingestion. For slugs and snails, we have a product called Sluggo, which is spinosad in a pelleted granular form. Sluggo works as a bait for slugs and snails in the vegetable garden.<br /> <br /> Fungicides:<br /> <br /> An OMRI registered option like our Complete Disease Control can be used for your fungal problems in the vegetable garden. You can use it either by soil drench or foliar spray as a protectant. When used as a soil drench, it can help with some of your soil-borne diseases. When used as a foliar spray, it covers the plant and protects it from disease pores. A widely used agricultural fungicide, Liquid Cop is great for controlling powdery mildew, downy mildew, and blight issues. Used especially for powdery and downy mildew, Bi-Carb is a great product to protect against those mildews on roses, vegetables, fruit trees, and ornamentals.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Greg brought some of his Calypso Cumcumbers, which is a hybrid pickling variety that is really productive in the vegetable garden. The guys taste test and compare the Calypso and Lemon cucumbers. Greg definitely recommends growing the Lemon Cucumbers in your garden. Travis talks about one of the most productive crops in the entire vegetable garden -- Tiger Collards.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about their relation and their Hoss seed selection process. They also provide information on succession planting and vertical growing. Yes, Greg and Travis are related but they are not brothers. They choose seed varieties based on what they have tried and been recommended by seed and variety experts. Greg and Travis clean 39:44 Row by Row Episode 52: The Beginnings of Hoss Tools https://hosstools.com/beginnings-hoss-tools/ Mon, 10 Jun 2019 18:07:44 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=49618 How Hoss Tools Got Started Hoss Tools began about nine years ago when Greg and his friend decided that there was a need for quality gardening tools that were made in the USA. They also wanted to be able to offer excellent customer support for those tools. At the time they were both working other jobs when they started Hoss Tools, so they were not able to completely focus on the new business. As the business grew, they both realized that it would require more of their time. Greg bought his partner's portion of the business and started to create an online presence for the company. Since then, Greg has sold his other business and is now concentrating on Hoss Tools full-time. Travis joined the team around 2013 when the business really started evolving. Now Hoss Tools is completely direct-to-consumer so that we are able to provide better customer service and support. Row by Row Garden Show: One Year Anniversary The Row by Row Garden Show is a weekly gardening talk show where Greg and Travis discuss what is happening in their gardens, discuss a certain topic for the week, and answer viewer questions. For the one-year anniversary show, the guys decided to do a big giveaway for their viewers to thank them for showing so much support for the show thus far. The guys did a drawing for several collections of seed packs which included ProCut Sunflower, Lettuce, Peppers, and Summer and Winter Squash packs. They also gave away some of their fertilizers such as Chilean Nitrate, 20-20-20, and Micro-Boost. Finally, they drew names for some of their most popular garden tools like the short single tine cultivator, long single tine cultivator, 8 mil drip tape kit, and the new Hoss Stirrup Hoe. The two biggest products at the end of the giveaway were the Single Wheel Hoe and the Double Wheel Hoe. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Greg has some freshly harvested Golden Delight Zucchini and Goldprize Squash that were really productive this year. Also, his cucumbers are about ready to harvest in the next couple of days. Travis shows his Starfighter lettuce that is looking really good and productive. He also talks about the productivity of his jambalaya okra and how tall they are growing. Greg also brought a huge bulb of green Kohlrabi and mentions that Travis may be envious because he doesn't know his secret. He recently harvested all of his onions and laid them on the ground to cure for a couple of days before he stores them in the barn. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about yellow squash/zucchini issues, "banding" fertilizer, fish emulsion, and organic solutions for phosphorous and potassium. Travis explains that garden soil pH can become too acidic over time if you grow the same crops year after year in the same spot. This will also start to create some fertilization problems, because plants cannot uptake nutrients in soils with an incorrect pH. To help resolve these issues, you should practice better crop rotations and build the organic matter in your soils. To "band" fertilize, Greg takes his two-gallon sprayer with the tip-off and uses either some 20-20-20 or Chilean Nitrate. He then applies it in a band about 3 to 4 inches beside the plant or plant foliage. The fish emulsion products available in stores are not ready for uptake by plants. Any organic fertilizer will have a much slower uptake because it has to be broken down to those smaller chemical forms like ammonia or nitrate. Greg says that some good organic solutions for phosphate are soft rock phosphate and bone meal for phosphorous. Products Mentioned in the Show Micro-Boost https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1cEm7087c5M&t=973s How Hoss Tools Got Started Hoss Tools began about nine years ago when Greg and his friend decided that there was a need for quality gardening tools that were made in the USA. They also wanted to be able to offer excellent customer support for those to... How Hoss Tools Got Started<br /> Hoss Tools began about nine years ago when Greg and his friend decided that there was a need for quality gardening tools that were made in the USA. They also wanted to be able to offer excellent customer support for those tools. At the time they were both working other jobs when they started Hoss Tools, so they were not able to completely focus on the new business. As the business grew, they both realized that it would require more of their time. Greg bought his partner's portion of the business and started to create an online presence for the company. Since then, Greg has sold his other business and is now concentrating on Hoss Tools full-time. Travis joined the team around 2013 when the business really started evolving. Now Hoss Tools is completely direct-to-consumer so that we are able to provide better customer service and support.<br /> Row by Row Garden Show: One Year Anniversary<br /> The Row by Row Garden Show is a weekly gardening talk show where Greg and Travis discuss what is happening in their gardens, discuss a certain topic for the week, and answer viewer questions. For the one-year anniversary show, the guys decided to do a big giveaway for their viewers to thank them for showing so much support for the show thus far. The guys did a drawing for several collections of seed packs which included ProCut Sunflower, Lettuce, Peppers, and Summer and Winter Squash packs. They also gave away some of their fertilizers such as Chilean Nitrate, 20-20-20, and Micro-Boost. Finally, they drew names for some of their most popular garden tools like the short single tine cultivator, long single tine cultivator, 8 mil drip tape kit, and the new Hoss Stirrup Hoe. The two biggest products at the end of the giveaway were the Single Wheel Hoe and the Double Wheel Hoe.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Greg has some freshly harvested Golden Delight Zucchini and Goldprize Squash that were really productive this year. Also, his cucumbers are about ready to harvest in the next couple of days. Travis shows his Starfighter lettuce that is looking really good and productive. He also talks about the productivity of his jambalaya okra and how tall they are growing. Greg also brought a huge bulb of green Kohlrabi and mentions that Travis may be envious because he doesn't know his secret. He recently harvested all of his onions and laid them on the ground to cure for a couple of days before he stores them in the barn.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about yellow squash/zucchini issues, "banding" fertilizer, fish emulsion, and organic solutions for phosphorous and potassium. Travis explains that garden soil pH can become too acidic over time if you grow the same crops year after year in the same spot. This will also start to create some fertilization problems, because plants cannot uptake nutrients in soils with an incorrect pH. To help resolve these issues, you should practice better crop rotations and build the organic matter in your soils. To "band" fertilize, Greg takes his two-gallon sprayer with the tip-off and uses either some 20-20-20 or Chilean Nitrate. He then applies it in a band about 3 to 4 inches beside the plant or plant foliage. The fish emulsion products available in stores are not ready for uptake by plants. Any organic fertilizer will have a much slower uptake because it has to be broken down to those smaller chemical forms like ammonia or nitrate. Greg says that some good organic solutions for phosphate are soft rock phosphate and bone meal for phosphorous.<br /> Products Mentioned in the Show<br /> <br /> Micro-Boost<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1cEm7087c5M&t=973s Greg and Travis clean 30:30 Row by Row Episode 51: Are You Giving Enough Fertilizer to Your Tomatoes? https://hosstools.com/are-you-fertilizing-tomatoes/ Mon, 10 Jun 2019 14:49:44 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=49503 Fertilizing Tomatoes Tomatoes are one of the most popular crops grown by the backyard vegetable gardener. Providing the correct amount of nutrients is an important part of solving the tomato-growing puzzle. Having an effective fertilizing schedule or program will greatly improve your success when growing tomatoes in the vegetable garden. When To Fertilize Your Tomatoes Here are some things to consider when thinking about fertilizing tomatoes. The optimal soil pH range for tomatoes is 6.2 - 6.8. In order to achieve the proper soil pH, you can apply lime three months ahead of planting to adjust the soil pH and provide some calcium for your tomatoes. A soil test should always be conducted before applying lime. It is very easy to raise the pH using lime, but very difficult to lower the pH if too much lime is added. Tomatoes will benefit from a balanced fertilizer which includes equal parts of the three big macronutrients: Nitrogen, Phosphorous, and Potassium. The recommended use of phosphorous is to apply all of it before planting, because it help the plants to establish a solid root system and phosphorous will not leach out of the soil. When applying phosphorous at pre-plant, you should apply 3.5 pounds of phosphorous per thousand square foot. As opposed to phosphorous, nitrogen and potassium will need to be "spoon-fed" to the tomato plants. The recommended rate is 3.5 pounds of nitrogen and potassium per thousand square foot, but both of these nutrients should be administered differently than phosphorous. Only around 1.5 pounds of nitrogen and potassium per 1,000 sq. ft. needs to be applied at pre-plant. Then 0.3 pounds per thousand square foot will need to be applied on a bi-weekly basis. This is the "spoon-feeding" part. The best way to apply these fertilizers is through an injector that works in conjunction with the drip tape irrigation system. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Travis brought a bundle of one of the most productive crops in his garden -- Lacinato Kale. He also brought some of his Texas Legend onions on which the tops have fallen. Once he harvests all the alliums (onions, leeks, elephant garlic) from this plot, he plans to go ahead and plant his sweet potatoes. Greg is thinking about planting a cover crop like Buckwheat before he plants his potatoes in June. It will be interesting to see who comes out on top with sweet potatoes this year. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about planting rattlesnake pole beans and reusing drip tape. Greg plants his rattlesnake pole beans directly on top of his drip tape. Once they emerge from the soil, he installs the cow panel trellis directly on top of the plants. He places the panel trellis about 3-4" off the ground so that plants can easily grow on the trellis as they get larger. Travis does not save drip tape from one year to the next. But he does reuse it multiple times in a given year. So it can definitely be used for multiple seasons. He mentions that they have four seasons that they can grow food, so they will reuse the tape four times. You can also reuse the mainline by plugging previous holes goof plugs. There is not really a great way to store and put away drip tape, so it is best if you just use it in the four seasons and replace it. Products Mentioned in the Show 20-20-20 Garden Fertilizer Micro-Boost https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fsPiACM4I2U&t=615s Fertilizing Tomatoes Tomatoes are one of the most popular crops grown by the backyard vegetable gardener. Providing the correct amount of nutrients is an important part of solving the tomato-growing puzzle. Fertilizing Tomatoes<br /> Tomatoes are one of the most popular crops grown by the backyard vegetable gardener. Providing the correct amount of nutrients is an important part of solving the tomato-growing puzzle. Having an effective fertilizing schedule or program will greatly improve your success when growing tomatoes in the vegetable garden.<br /> When To Fertilize Your Tomatoes<br /> Here are some things to consider when thinking about fertilizing tomatoes. The optimal soil pH range for tomatoes is 6.2 - 6.8. In order to achieve the proper soil pH, you can apply lime three months ahead of planting to adjust the soil pH and provide some calcium for your tomatoes. A soil test should always be conducted before applying lime. It is very easy to raise the pH using lime, but very difficult to lower the pH if too much lime is added.<br /> <br /> Tomatoes will benefit from a balanced fertilizer which includes equal parts of the three big macronutrients: Nitrogen, Phosphorous, and Potassium. The recommended use of phosphorous is to apply all of it before planting, because it help the plants to establish a solid root system and phosphorous will not leach out of the soil. When applying phosphorous at pre-plant, you should apply 3.5 pounds of phosphorous per thousand square foot.<br /> <br /> As opposed to phosphorous, nitrogen and potassium will need to be "spoon-fed" to the tomato plants. The recommended rate is 3.5 pounds of nitrogen and potassium per thousand square foot, but both of these nutrients should be administered differently than phosphorous. Only around 1.5 pounds of nitrogen and potassium per 1,000 sq. ft. needs to be applied at pre-plant. Then 0.3 pounds per thousand square foot will need to be applied on a bi-weekly basis. This is the "spoon-feeding" part. The best way to apply these fertilizers is through an injector that works in conjunction with the drip tape irrigation system.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Travis brought a bundle of one of the most productive crops in his garden -- Lacinato Kale. He also brought some of his Texas Legend onions on which the tops have fallen. Once he harvests all the alliums (onions, leeks, elephant garlic) from this plot, he plans to go ahead and plant his sweet potatoes. Greg is thinking about planting a cover crop like Buckwheat before he plants his potatoes in June. It will be interesting to see who comes out on top with sweet potatoes this year.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about planting rattlesnake pole beans and reusing drip tape. Greg plants his rattlesnake pole beans directly on top of his drip tape. Once they emerge from the soil, he installs the cow panel trellis directly on top of the plants. He places the panel trellis about 3-4" off the ground so that plants can easily grow on the trellis as they get larger. Travis does not save drip tape from one year to the next. But he does reuse it multiple times in a given year. So it can definitely be used for multiple seasons. He mentions that they have four seasons that they can grow food, so they will reuse the tape four times. You can also reuse the mainline by plugging previous holes goof plugs. There is not really a great way to store and put away drip tape, so it is best if you just use it in the four seasons and replace it.<br /> Products Mentioned in the Show<br /> <br /> 20-20-20 Garden Fertilizer<br /> Micro-Boost<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fsPiACM4I2U&t=615s Greg and Travis clean 33:35 Row by Row Episode 50: The Truth Behind Why This Forbes Article Is All WRONG! https://hosstools.com/truth-behind-forbes-article-is-wrong/ Fri, 07 Jun 2019 17:04:40 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=49494 Breaking Down the Forbes Article We all know that everything written on the internet may not be completely true. When reading an article, it is important to understand the intention of the article and the background of the author or writer. You should always give yourself the freedom to make informed decisions. Building your own facts and knowledge on a topic is much better than assuming a person or media source is completely right all the time. Setting The Facts Straight In this Forbes Article entitled "Why I Don't Buy Organic, and Why You Might Not Want to Either," the writer has the position that there is not much difference between organic and conventionally-grown food. His first point includes the argument that there is no difference between the conventionally grown food vs. organic food. This is probably the biggest myth of the entire article. Commercially-grown food that you buy in the grocery store has often been over-fertilized and injected with pesticides that are completely different than what the organic farmers use on their food.In his second point, he makes the preposterous statement that conventional pesticides are non-toxic to humans. In reality the suffix "cide" in the word pesticide means to kill something. Any kind of pesticide can be harmful whether they are used for conventional or organic, but you have to understand and know the proper ways to use those pesticides. The third point the author makes is that just because organic food costs more does not mean it is safer. Organic food costs more because it is more costly to produce. Organic farming usually occurs on a smaller scale and can be more labor intensive than commercial farming.The fourth point of the article is that conventional farming requires less land and is more eco-friendly. Organic farming was built on the premise of building the soil. Since then, the government has gotten involved with organic certification and the emphasis on building the soil has not been as strong. Conventional farmers are not interested in building soils, they're interested in maximizing profits on a given piece of land. The last point made by the Forbes Article is more truthful than any of the other points made. He states that the marketing of organic products is unethical and fear-based. This is somewhat true because so many companies exploit certain terms to comply with the demand for all-natural or organic products. In summary, it is important to understand how things are produced and know both sides of the conventional and organic farming argument. Then you will be able to make informed decisions based on what you believe, not what others tell you. 2016 Forbes Article: "Why I Don't Buy Organic, and Why You Might Not Want to Either" Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Greg has some red onions that are coming along pretty good, but are not quite ready to harvest. Travis recently planted two varieties of his winter squash in his new dream garden. He planted half in the Hai Kabocha and the other half in Small Wonder Spaghetti. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about side dressing corn and when to stop hilling potatoes. Greg usually side-dresses corn plants using some Chilean Nitrate and puts it about 3 inches from the plant. Travis says the time to stop hilling potatoes will depend on the variety. For early to mid-season crops such as our Yukon Gold or Red Norland, you would hill them around a 1' - 1.5' tall. With a later-maturing variety like the German Butterball, you can continually hill the plants as they grow for more potato production. Products Mentioned in the Show German Butterball Potato https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RvriwP7SqcU Breaking Down the Forbes Article We all know that everything written on the internet may not be completely true. When reading an article, it is important to understand the intention of the article and the background of the author or writer. Breaking Down the Forbes Article<br /> We all know that everything written on the internet may not be completely true. When reading an article, it is important to understand the intention of the article and the background of the author or writer. You should always give yourself the freedom to make informed decisions. Building your own facts and knowledge on a topic is much better than assuming a person or media source is completely right all the time.<br /> Setting The Facts Straight<br /> In this Forbes Article entitled "Why I Don't Buy Organic, and Why You Might Not Want to Either," the writer has the position that there is not much difference between organic and conventionally-grown food. His first point includes the argument that there is no difference between the conventionally grown food vs. organic food. This is probably the biggest myth of the entire article. Commercially-grown food that you buy in the grocery store has often been over-fertilized and injected with pesticides that are completely different than what the organic farmers use on their food.In his second point, he makes the preposterous statement that conventional pesticides are non-toxic to humans. In reality the suffix "cide" in the word pesticide means to kill something. Any kind of pesticide can be harmful whether they are used for conventional or organic, but you have to understand and know the proper ways to use those pesticides.<br /> <br /> The third point the author makes is that just because organic food costs more does not mean it is safer. Organic food costs more because it is more costly to produce. Organic farming usually occurs on a smaller scale and can be more labor intensive than commercial farming.The fourth point of the article is that conventional farming requires less land and is more eco-friendly. Organic farming was built on the premise of building the soil. Since then, the government has gotten involved with organic certification and the emphasis on building the soil has not been as strong. Conventional farmers are not interested in building soils, they're interested in maximizing profits on a given piece of land.<br /> <br /> The last point made by the Forbes Article is more truthful than any of the other points made. He states that the marketing of organic products is unethical and fear-based. This is somewhat true because so many companies exploit certain terms to comply with the demand for all-natural or organic products. In summary, it is important to understand how things are produced and know both sides of the conventional and organic farming argument. Then you will be able to make informed decisions based on what you believe, not what others tell you.<br /> <br /> 2016 Forbes Article: "Why I Don't Buy Organic, and Why You Might Not Want to Either"<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Greg has some red onions that are coming along pretty good, but are not quite ready to harvest. Travis recently planted two varieties of his winter squash in his new dream garden. He planted half in the Hai Kabocha and the other half in Small Wonder Spaghetti.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about side dressing corn and when to stop hilling potatoes. Greg usually side-dresses corn plants using some Chilean Nitrate and puts it about 3 inches from the plant. Travis says the time to stop hilling potatoes will depend on the variety. For early to mid-season crops such as our Yukon Gold or Red Norland, you would hill them around a 1' - 1.5' tall. With a later-maturing variety like the German Butterball, you can continually hill the plants as they grow for more potato production.<br /> Products Mentioned in the Show<br /> <br /> German Butterball Potato<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RvriwP7SqcU Greg and Travis clean 33:12 Row by Row Episode 49: Are You Giving Your Garden Enough Water? https://hosstools.com/giving-vegetable-garden-enough-water/ Thu, 06 Jun 2019 19:09:47 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=49450 How Much Water Does Your Garden Need Knowing how much to water your garden can be rather tricky because there are so many variables at play. In general, vegetable crops in the garden need about 1 to 1.5 inches of water per week. If an entire acre was to receive an inch of water, that would equal 27,154 gallons of water. If you convert that to a smaller scale, that would equate to 0.6 gallons per square foot per week. Our 8 mil drip tape has an output rate of 0.4 gallons per minute per 100 feet. In other words, it would take 1,000 minutes or 16 hours for a single emitter to output 4 gallons of water. A common mistake is watering more than the holding capacity of the soil. The more dense the soil, the better the holding capacity and the longer you can water at one time. For sandy soils, the holding capacity will be lower and you should only water a maximum of 1.5 hours at a time. For clay soils, the holding capacity can be double and you could thus run the water for up to 3 hours a time before wasting water. Factors That Can Affect This One major factor is whether you are using subsurface or surface drip. Subsurface drip tape is buried below the soil surface and is the most efficient and conservative way of watering the garden. Surface drip sits on the soil surface and will result in loss of water through evaporation. This will require longer watering times because the water is not being delivered directly to the plant roots. Another factor is the placement of your crops. If your plants are directly on top of drip emitters, you will need less water compared to plants that are located between drip tape emitters. Crops like tomatoes and peppers are typically planted directly on top of emitters whereas corn and beans are planted between emitters. Two additional factors, which we cannot control, are wind and temperature. These will also affect how much water is needed. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Greg brought a kohlrabi bulb and explored some of his diverse language skills. After doing some research, Greg discovered that Kohlrabi in German means "cabbage turnip." Not only do they eat Kohlrabi in Germany, but they eat them in Vietnam and Bangladesh too. In Vietnam, they call them "su hoa" and in Bangladesh, they're called "ol kapi." Kohlrabi has a mild turnip taste and most people prefer to eat them roasted, although they are great raw as well. Some people also like to make coleslaw with kohlrabi. Greg has added that to his to-do list this year. Travis just finished adding some stakes to his determinate tomatoes in the garden. The guys discuss different methods on why and how they like to add their twine around the tomato plants. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about organic pesticides and lettuce germination tips for non-greenhouse owners. Greg explains that any pesticide with the suffix "cide" designates that it was designed to kill something. The safest and best insecticide for preserving beneficial insect populations is Neem Oil. Another great organic pesticide is B.t., which works pretty much only on worms. As always, the best time to apply these pesticides is late in the afternoon in your garden. Travis gives some tips to help with germination for non-greenhouse gardeners. If you have any kind of problems with germination, it is a good idea to use pelleted and primed lettuce seed. Pelleted seeds offer wonderful germination rates, they're easier to seed in the seed trays and they're quick to germinate. Products Mentioned in the Show Calshot Romaine Lettuce Starfighter Lettuce 8 Mil Drip Tape Irrigation Kit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n0UNOtGC72o&t=103s How Much Water Does Your Garden Need Knowing how much to water your garden can be rather tricky because there are so many variables at play. In general, vegetable crops in the garden need about 1 to 1.5 inches of water per week. How Much Water Does Your Garden Need<br /> Knowing how much to water your garden can be rather tricky because there are so many variables at play. In general, vegetable crops in the garden need about 1 to 1.5 inches of water per week. If an entire acre was to receive an inch of water, that would equal 27,154 gallons of water. If you convert that to a smaller scale, that would equate to 0.6 gallons per square foot per week. Our 8 mil drip tape has an output rate of 0.4 gallons per minute per 100 feet. In other words, it would take 1,000 minutes or 16 hours for a single emitter to output 4 gallons of water. A common mistake is watering more than the holding capacity of the soil. The more dense the soil, the better the holding capacity and the longer you can water at one time. For sandy soils, the holding capacity will be lower and you should only water a maximum of 1.5 hours at a time. For clay soils, the holding capacity can be double and you could thus run the water for up to 3 hours a time before wasting water.<br /> Factors That Can Affect This<br /> One major factor is whether you are using subsurface or surface drip. Subsurface drip tape is buried below the soil surface and is the most efficient and conservative way of watering the garden. Surface drip sits on the soil surface and will result in loss of water through evaporation. This will require longer watering times because the water is not being delivered directly to the plant roots. Another factor is the placement of your crops. If your plants are directly on top of drip emitters, you will need less water compared to plants that are located between drip tape emitters. Crops like tomatoes and peppers are typically planted directly on top of emitters whereas corn and beans are planted between emitters. Two additional factors, which we cannot control, are wind and temperature. These will also affect how much water is needed.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Greg brought a kohlrabi bulb and explored some of his diverse language skills. After doing some research, Greg discovered that Kohlrabi in German means "cabbage turnip." Not only do they eat Kohlrabi in Germany, but they eat them in Vietnam and Bangladesh too. In Vietnam, they call them "su hoa" and in Bangladesh, they're called "ol kapi." Kohlrabi has a mild turnip taste and most people prefer to eat them roasted, although they are great raw as well. Some people also like to make coleslaw with kohlrabi. Greg has added that to his to-do list this year. Travis just finished adding some stakes to his determinate tomatoes in the garden. The guys discuss different methods on why and how they like to add their twine around the tomato plants.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about organic pesticides and lettuce germination tips for non-greenhouse owners. Greg explains that any pesticide with the suffix "cide" designates that it was designed to kill something. The safest and best insecticide for preserving beneficial insect populations is Neem Oil. Another great organic pesticide is B.t., which works pretty much only on worms. As always, the best time to apply these pesticides is late in the afternoon in your garden. Travis gives some tips to help with germination for non-greenhouse gardeners. If you have any kind of problems with germination, it is a good idea to use pelleted and primed lettuce seed. Pelleted seeds offer wonderful germination rates, they're easier to seed in the seed trays and they're quick to germinate.<br /> Products Mentioned in the Show<br /> <br /> Calshot Romaine Lettuce<br /> Starfighter Lettuce<br /> 8 Mil Drip Tape Irrigation Kit<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n0UNOtGC72o&t=103s Greg and Travis clean 31:30 Row by Row Episode 48: Interplanting Flowers in Your Vegetable Garden https://hosstools.com/interplanting-flowers-vegetable-garden/ Thu, 06 Jun 2019 16:28:57 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=49438 Improving Your Garden with Cut Flowers Do you want some vibrant, eye-appealing crops in your vegetable garden? Interplanting flowers in your vegetable garden will leave you astonished by how it can attract more pollinators and beneficial insects, which will subsequently improve your garden production. When thinking of planting during the summer months, interplanting cut flowers are a great choice because they can survive the summer heat much better than most vegetable crops. Cut Flower Varieties All of the cut flower varieties we carry can be direct-seeded or transplanted. We prefer to grow most of them from transplants because it makes it a little easier and it conserves seed. The great thing about growing cut flowers in the summer season is that they absolutely love the heat and do not have hardly any insect issues. All of our cut flower varieties have really nice long stems which makes them very appealing to the eye. A purple colored flower variety such as Ageratum Blue Horizon is a great pelleted seed that grows in these beautiful purple clusters. A brightly colored Cosmos mix called Versailles is great for attracting pollinators such as butterflies, birds, and bees. An older variety of Celosia, which you may remember as a child, is Chief Mix, also known as Cockscomb. The ProCut line of sunflowers is popular in the garden providing very manageable flower height. Another great thing about the ProCut Sunflowers is that they are pollenless. So when you harvest them and place them in a vase, they will not drip pollen and leave a mess. Our ProCut Sunflower selection includes colors like red, lemon, orange, plum, and white nite. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Travis brought a head of Skyphos Lettuce and shows how to make a healthy little snack using his lettuce and chicken salad. Greg calls it the Chicken Salad Lettuce Taco. The guys talk about a new variety of lettuce called Starfighter Lettuce, which is a pelleted seed that they have transplanted in a 162 cell seed starting tray. This Starfighter lettuce is ready to go in the ground and will get planted later in the week. Greg shows some of his Banana Shallots and was a little concerned on how well they were doing because he was late planting them. The ones he has pulled thus far were a little bit on the spicy side, but he thinks the taste is subject to change if he waits longer to harvest them. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about side dressing potatoes and they discuss whitefly problems. Travis explains that his preferred way of side dressing is using chicken manure compost. If you do not have access to quality manure compost, you can use some granular fertilizer such as 10-10-10. According to Greg, whiteflies can be tough to manage in some years. If it is a wet year and we receive plenty of rain, the whiteflies are really no issue at all. If it is drier year, the whiteflies are much more of a problem. Whiteflies can be tough because they are nearly impossible to control when they come into your garden. Greg does note that he's had success using an insect growth-regulator called Knack, but that it can be hard to find. Products Mentioned in the Show Cut Flower Seeds https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o7P75afcTi8 Improving Your Garden with Cut Flowers Do you want some vibrant, eye-appealing crops in your vegetable garden? Interplanting flowers in your vegetable garden will leave you astonished by how it can attract more pollinators and beneficial insects, Improving Your Garden with Cut Flowers<br /> Do you want some vibrant, eye-appealing crops in your vegetable garden? Interplanting flowers in your vegetable garden will leave you astonished by how it can attract more pollinators and beneficial insects, which will subsequently improve your garden production. When thinking of planting during the summer months, interplanting cut flowers are a great choice because they can survive the summer heat much better than most vegetable crops.<br /> Cut Flower Varieties<br /> All of the cut flower varieties we carry can be direct-seeded or transplanted. We prefer to grow most of them from transplants because it makes it a little easier and it conserves seed. The great thing about growing cut flowers in the summer season is that they absolutely love the heat and do not have hardly any insect issues. All of our cut flower varieties have really nice long stems which makes them very appealing to the eye. A purple colored flower variety such as Ageratum Blue Horizon is a great pelleted seed that grows in these beautiful purple clusters. A brightly colored Cosmos mix called Versailles is great for attracting pollinators such as butterflies, birds, and bees. An older variety of Celosia, which you may remember as a child, is Chief Mix, also known as Cockscomb. The ProCut line of sunflowers is popular in the garden providing very manageable flower height. Another great thing about the ProCut Sunflowers is that they are pollenless. So when you harvest them and place them in a vase, they will not drip pollen and leave a mess. Our ProCut Sunflower selection includes colors like red, lemon, orange, plum, and white nite.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Travis brought a head of Skyphos Lettuce and shows how to make a healthy little snack using his lettuce and chicken salad. Greg calls it the Chicken Salad Lettuce Taco. The guys talk about a new variety of lettuce called Starfighter Lettuce, which is a pelleted seed that they have transplanted in a 162 cell seed starting tray. This Starfighter lettuce is ready to go in the ground and will get planted later in the week. Greg shows some of his Banana Shallots and was a little concerned on how well they were doing because he was late planting them. The ones he has pulled thus far were a little bit on the spicy side, but he thinks the taste is subject to change if he waits longer to harvest them.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about side dressing potatoes and they discuss whitefly problems. Travis explains that his preferred way of side dressing is using chicken manure compost. If you do not have access to quality manure compost, you can use some granular fertilizer such as 10-10-10. According to Greg, whiteflies can be tough to manage in some years. If it is a wet year and we receive plenty of rain, the whiteflies are really no issue at all. If it is drier year, the whiteflies are much more of a problem. Whiteflies can be tough because they are nearly impossible to control when they come into your garden. Greg does note that he's had success using an insect growth-regulator called Knack, but that it can be hard to find.<br /> Products Mentioned in the Show<br /> <br /> Cut Flower Seeds<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o7P75afcTi8 Greg and Travis clean 34:14 Row by Row by Episode 47: Winter Squash and Pumpkins for Your Vegetable Garden https://hosstools.com/winter-squash-pumpkins/ Thu, 06 Jun 2019 14:21:35 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=49386 Growing Winter Squash and Pumpkins Winter squash are not planted in the winter months. They are planted in the spring, much like summer squash, but they will store well into the winter. That is why they are called "winter squash". Winter squash should be planted in the spring after the chance of frost has passed. They are typically planted a few weeks after one would traditionally plant summer squash or zucchini varieties. One of the most under-recognized food sources for the home gardener, winter squash is a valuable crop that should be grown by more people because of the long-lasting shelf life without refrigeration. Winter Squash Varieties There are three primary species of winter squash, Cucurbita maxima, Cucurbita pepo, and Cucurbita moschata. Cucurbita maxima include species like kabocha squash that are very sweet and widely considered one of the best-tasting squash types. Cucurbita pepo includes varieties like Delicata and Spaghetti Squash. Cucurbita moschata includes varieties like Butternut, Seminole Pumpkin, Fairytale Pumpkin, and our Blue Bayou Pumpkin. The moschata tends to include more heat tolerant varieties and are a little more resistant to insect pressure. The recommended area of spacing to grow winter squash is at least a 20' x 20' or 30' x 30' area due to their extensive ground cover, much like watermelons. Most of these squash have 90 days to maturity which is about 40 days longer than summer squash. That being said, it is important to keep this winter squash on drip irrigation to reduce your chances of having issues with downy and powdery mildew. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Travis has some okra transplants that are ready to be planted. Growing okra from transplants has always been successful for the guys. Greg talks about how excited he is about his shallots that are looking healthy and growing well. Travis mentions that he may have to do a little research on when exactly he should harvest his leeks. However, they seem to be growing and doing just fine. So he will wait to harvest his leeks at a later time. The peppers are ready to "step up" into a 4" pot once they start getting the second set of true leaves. So the guys are busy stepping up the peppers and getting those acclimated to the bigger seed trays in the greenhouse. The guys also share a new tool called the Hoss Stirrup Hoe which is a long-handled version of their Oscillating Hoe attachment for the Wheel Hoe. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about planting green beans and using fruit trees to attract pollinators. Travis says that pole beans need a panel or some type of trellis because they are climbing beans. Greg says it takes 50 days to maturity on pole beans and to definitely plant before the end of May. Greg states that trees are great for pollinators, but you should think several years ahead of time because they take longer to grow than flowers. With flowers, they are quicker and easier to get them in the ground and blooming if you need something quick. Some tree varieties that are wonderful for pollinators include native oaks or any trees that bloom in the springtime. Greg suggests that you should stay away from trees that are not native to your area because you will have difficulty growing those types. Products Mentioned in the Show Rattlesnake Pole Bean Kentucky Wonder Pole Bean   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fylO6MWXZF8&list=PLpE5HGhzrST9SIWO8FTk2rMrFONDmIl2v&index=11&t=0s   Growing Winter Squash and Pumpkins Winter squash are not planted in the winter months. They are planted in the spring, much like summer squash, but they will store well into the winter. That is why they are called "winter squash". Growing Winter Squash and Pumpkins<br /> Winter squash are not planted in the winter months. They are planted in the spring, much like summer squash, but they will store well into the winter. That is why they are called "winter squash". Winter squash should be planted in the spring after the chance of frost has passed. They are typically planted a few weeks after one would traditionally plant summer squash or zucchini varieties. One of the most under-recognized food sources for the home gardener, winter squash is a valuable crop that should be grown by more people because of the long-lasting shelf life without refrigeration.<br /> Winter Squash Varieties<br /> There are three primary species of winter squash, Cucurbita maxima, Cucurbita pepo, and Cucurbita moschata. Cucurbita maxima include species like kabocha squash that are very sweet and widely considered one of the best-tasting squash types. Cucurbita pepo includes varieties like Delicata and Spaghetti Squash. Cucurbita moschata includes varieties like Butternut, Seminole Pumpkin, Fairytale Pumpkin, and our Blue Bayou Pumpkin. The moschata tends to include more heat tolerant varieties and are a little more resistant to insect pressure. The recommended area of spacing to grow winter squash is at least a 20' x 20' or 30' x 30' area due to their extensive ground cover, much like watermelons. Most of these squash have 90 days to maturity which is about 40 days longer than summer squash. That being said, it is important to keep this winter squash on drip irrigation to reduce your chances of having issues with downy and powdery mildew.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Travis has some okra transplants that are ready to be planted. Growing okra from transplants has always been successful for the guys. Greg talks about how excited he is about his shallots that are looking healthy and growing well. Travis mentions that he may have to do a little research on when exactly he should harvest his leeks. However, they seem to be growing and doing just fine. So he will wait to harvest his leeks at a later time. The peppers are ready to "step up" into a 4" pot once they start getting the second set of true leaves. So the guys are busy stepping up the peppers and getting those acclimated to the bigger seed trays in the greenhouse. The guys also share a new tool called the Hoss Stirrup Hoe which is a long-handled version of their Oscillating Hoe attachment for the Wheel Hoe.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about planting green beans and using fruit trees to attract pollinators. Travis says that pole beans need a panel or some type of trellis because they are climbing beans. Greg says it takes 50 days to maturity on pole beans and to definitely plant before the end of May. Greg states that trees are great for pollinators, but you should think several years ahead of time because they take longer to grow than flowers. With flowers, they are quicker and easier to get them in the ground and blooming if you need something quick. Some tree varieties that are wonderful for pollinators include native oaks or any trees that bloom in the springtime. Greg suggests that you should stay away from trees that are not native to your area because you will have difficulty growing those types.<br /> Products Mentioned in the Show<br /> <br /> Rattlesnake Pole Bean<br /> Kentucky Wonder Pole Bean<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fylO6MWXZF8&list=PLpE5HGhzrST9SIWO8FTk2rMrFONDmIl2v&index=11&t=0s<br /> <br />   Greg and Travis clean 32:54 Row by Row Episode 46: Improving Pollinators for Garden Harvest https://hosstools.com/improving-pollinators-garden-harvest/ Wed, 05 Jun 2019 20:29:46 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=45801 Improving Your Garden Harvest with Pollinators Pollinators are essential for producing fruits in the vegetable garden. Crops like squash, cucumbers and watermelon will require pollination in order to make fruits. The more pollinators present, the more fruits you will have to harvest. In order to improve your garden harvest, you must understand the importance of providing a healthy and safe environment for pollinators. You should always be cautious when spraying insecticides so that you do not harm the pollinator populations. Even some organic insecticides like pyrethrin and spinosad can be detrimental to pollinators if sprayed during pollination hours. So it's always a good idea to spray insecticides late in the evenings, when the pollinators are no longer pollinating. You certainly want to avoid harsh chemicals like neonicotinoids. These are systemic insecticides that are inside the plant and will kill whatever eats or pollinates the plant. Neonicotinoids have been known to cause complete colony collapses in bees. Special Guest: Gary from BEE-LIEVE Today we had a special guest -- Gary from BEE-LIEVE Farms. Gary spends the majority of his day working with bees. Greg and Gary discuss how poor pollination can cause fruits to be distorted or rotten on the ends. They also provide helpful tips to start and maintain a beehive in your garden. According to Gary, the best pollinating insect for a vegetable garden is the European Honeybee. He calls these the "true working bee." If you do not have access to a beehive, you can increase pollinator presence by planting flowers and other plants that will attract native bees. Planting flowers such as zinnias, sunflowers and cosmos will help because those flowers have easily accessible nectar for the bees to feed. If you do decide to purchase a beehive for your homestead or garden, Gary suggests doing adequate research to educate yourself on how to maintain and care for the bees. Check out BEE-LIEVE Apiaries & Farm: https://bee-lieveapiaries.com/ Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Travis shows some of his Purple Haze carrots that he recently harvested. Greg tries dipping carrots in honey which he appropriately names "honey carrots." Greg has rattlesnake pole beans, squash, cucumbers, and potatoes growing well in his garden. Travis explains that his potatoes are growing extremely slow this season. Also, he made a little mistake in his new dream garden. He thought it would be easier to plant his taters at one end of his subplot, but it ended up being the hardest dirt that he has in the new garden. This might cause a small issue because potatoes like soft, well-drained, sandy soil. And this dirt is the complete opposite. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about growing tomatoes in the fall and using drip tape for multiple seasons. Greg explains that growing tomatoes in the fall can be more difficult than growing them in the springtime. However, you can be successful if you plant your tomatoes early and use a disease-resistant variety such as Brickyard or Mountain Glory Also, have a consistent pest control spray program using Neem Oil or B.t. Travis talks about the best drip tape thickness if you intend to use it for multiple seasons. Travis always uses the 8 mil tape over the 15 mil tape because it is just much more flexible and easier to use, especially if you are reusing it for multiple harvesting seasons. Products Mentioned in the Show Yellowstone Carrot 8 Mil Drip Irrigation Tape https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KC2FUd0gD8Q&list=PLpE5HGhzrST9SIWO8FTk2rMrFONDmIl2v&index=12&t=0s Improving Your Garden Harvest with Pollinators Pollinators are essential for producing fruits in the vegetable garden. Crops like squash, cucumbers and watermelon will require pollination in order to make fruits. The more pollinators present, Improving Your Garden Harvest with Pollinators<br /> Pollinators are essential for producing fruits in the vegetable garden. Crops like squash, cucumbers and watermelon will require pollination in order to make fruits. The more pollinators present, the more fruits you will have to harvest. In order to improve your garden harvest, you must understand the importance of providing a healthy and safe environment for pollinators. You should always be cautious when spraying insecticides so that you do not harm the pollinator populations. Even some organic insecticides like pyrethrin and spinosad can be detrimental to pollinators if sprayed during pollination hours. So it's always a good idea to spray insecticides late in the evenings, when the pollinators are no longer pollinating. You certainly want to avoid harsh chemicals like neonicotinoids. These are systemic insecticides that are inside the plant and will kill whatever eats or pollinates the plant. Neonicotinoids have been known to cause complete colony collapses in bees.<br /> Special Guest: Gary from BEE-LIEVE<br /> Today we had a special guest -- Gary from BEE-LIEVE Farms. Gary spends the majority of his day working with bees. Greg and Gary discuss how poor pollination can cause fruits to be distorted or rotten on the ends. They also provide helpful tips to start and maintain a beehive in your garden. According to Gary, the best pollinating insect for a vegetable garden is the European Honeybee. He calls these the "true working bee." If you do not have access to a beehive, you can increase pollinator presence by planting flowers and other plants that will attract native bees. Planting flowers such as zinnias, sunflowers and cosmos will help because those flowers have easily accessible nectar for the bees to feed. If you do decide to purchase a beehive for your homestead or garden, Gary suggests doing adequate research to educate yourself on how to maintain and care for the bees.<br /> <br /> Check out BEE-LIEVE Apiaries & Farm: https://bee-lieveapiaries.com/<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Travis shows some of his Purple Haze carrots that he recently harvested. Greg tries dipping carrots in honey which he appropriately names "honey carrots." Greg has rattlesnake pole beans, squash, cucumbers, and potatoes growing well in his garden. Travis explains that his potatoes are growing extremely slow this season. Also, he made a little mistake in his new dream garden. He thought it would be easier to plant his taters at one end of his subplot, but it ended up being the hardest dirt that he has in the new garden. This might cause a small issue because potatoes like soft, well-drained, sandy soil. And this dirt is the complete opposite.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about growing tomatoes in the fall and using drip tape for multiple seasons. Greg explains that growing tomatoes in the fall can be more difficult than growing them in the springtime. However, you can be successful if you plant your tomatoes early and use a disease-resistant variety such as Brickyard or Mountain Glory Also, have a consistent pest control spray program using Neem Oil or B.t. Travis talks about the best drip tape thickness if you intend to use it for multiple seasons. Travis always uses the 8 mil tape over the 15 mil tape because it is just much more flexible and easier to use, especially if you are reusing it for multiple harvesting seasons.<br /> Products Mentioned in the Show<br /> <br /> Yellowstone Carrot<br /> 8 Mil Drip Irrigation Tape<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KC2FUd0gD8Q&list=PLpE5HGhzrST9SIWO8FTk2rMrFONDmIl2v&index=12&t=0s Greg and Travis clean 25:48 Row by Row Episode 45: The Best Varieties of Summer Squash and Cucumbers https://hosstools.com/summer-squash-cucumbers/ Thu, 28 Mar 2019 16:10:06 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=45212 Summer Squash and Cucumbers On this week’s episode, we discuss growing summer squash and cucumbers. Summer squash and cucumbers are in the cucurbit family. These plants have a relatively fast maturity date, but can be susceptible to fungal diseases as temperatures increase. Diseases like powdery mildew and downy mildew can cause problems on squash plants once humidity levels increase in early summer. Drip irrigation drastically helps to alleviate those pressures by reducing leaf moisture. Summer squash and cucumbers are also susceptible to insect pressure from cucumber beetles, squash bugs and more. These insects are easily controlled in the larval stage, but can be difficult to manage once adult populations bloom. Using B.t. early can help to prevent large adult populations. Crop rotation and proper removal of crop debris are also extremely important when growing cucurbits. Fungal spores and insect eggs can overwinter in the garden soil and cause problems in future years. Therefore, it's important to move these plants from year to year to prevent recurring issues. Some of our favorite varieties of summer squash include Sunburst, Golden Delight and Goldprize. Some of our favorite cucumber varieties include Calypso and Stonewall. Both of these varieties are gynoecious, which means they only produce female flowers and are extremely productive. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, the guys taste a sample of yellow carrots that have recently been harvested from Travis' garden. This variety is called Yellowstone and has always performed well in fall and spring. It produces very large, bright yellow carrots that are sweet and delicious. Greg also has some asparagus that he enjoys raw or cooked on the grill. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about tomato cross-pollination and "topping" peppers. Tomatoes are self-pollinating, but natural cross-pollination can occur, although rare. Most people, including us, have had no problems with planting multiple varieties of tomatoes in the same row. Greg mentions that he's never heard of "topping", or removing the apical meristem, on peppers. He says that he doesn't see any benefit to doing that. Tool of the Week Yellowstone Carrot https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=THYlGdpvGC0 Summer Squash and Cucumbers On this week’s episode, we discuss growing summer squash and cucumbers. Summer squash and cucumbers are in the cucurbit family. These plants have a relatively fast maturity date, Summer Squash and Cucumbers<br /> On this week’s episode, we discuss growing summer squash and cucumbers. Summer squash and cucumbers are in the cucurbit family. These plants have a relatively fast maturity date, but can be susceptible to fungal diseases as temperatures increase. Diseases like powdery mildew and downy mildew can cause problems on squash plants once humidity levels increase in early summer. Drip irrigation drastically helps to alleviate those pressures by reducing leaf moisture. Summer squash and cucumbers are also susceptible to insect pressure from cucumber beetles, squash bugs and more. These insects are easily controlled in the larval stage, but can be difficult to manage once adult populations bloom. Using B.t. early can help to prevent large adult populations. Crop rotation and proper removal of crop debris are also extremely important when growing cucurbits. Fungal spores and insect eggs can overwinter in the garden soil and cause problems in future years. Therefore, it's important to move these plants from year to year to prevent recurring issues. Some of our favorite varieties of summer squash include Sunburst, Golden Delight and Goldprize. Some of our favorite cucumber varieties include Calypso and Stonewall. Both of these varieties are gynoecious, which means they only produce female flowers and are extremely productive.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, the guys taste a sample of yellow carrots that have recently been harvested from Travis' garden. This variety is called Yellowstone and has always performed well in fall and spring. It produces very large, bright yellow carrots that are sweet and delicious. Greg also has some asparagus that he enjoys raw or cooked on the grill.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about tomato cross-pollination and "topping" peppers. Tomatoes are self-pollinating, but natural cross-pollination can occur, although rare. Most people, including us, have had no problems with planting multiple varieties of tomatoes in the same row. Greg mentions that he's never heard of "topping", or removing the apical meristem, on peppers. He says that he doesn't see any benefit to doing that.<br /> Tool of the Week<br /> Yellowstone Carrot<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=THYlGdpvGC0 Greg and Travis clean 26:52 Row by Row Episode 44: Our Favorite Pepper Varieties for the Garden https://hosstools.com/pepper-varieties/ Thu, 07 Mar 2019 20:05:24 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=44938 Pepper Varieties You Should Be Growing On this week’s episode, Greg and Travis discuss techniques for growing peppers and pepper varieties to plant in the vegetable garden. Pepper seed germination can take a while and will require some patience. Some varieties will take up to 2 weeks for germination. Hot pepper varieties usually take longer to germinate than sweet pepper varieties. Pepper transplants grow well in our heavy-duty seed starting trays when placed on a heated germination mat. Because pepper seedlings can be quite fragile, we recommend replanting them in 4" pots before transplanting into the ground. This will allow the stem to become stronger and more durable. Large pepper plants will need some form of support to keep them upright and keep fruits off the ground. For just a few plants, we recommend using our smaller Tomato Cages. For many plants or an entire row of peppers, the Florida Weave trellising technique works great. You can use cotton twine or commercial-grade, poly twine for this technique. Our current pepper varieties include Bayonet Bell Pepper, Gold Rush Banana Pepper, Tiburon Poblano Pepper, Beaver Dam Hot Pepper, and many others. Bayonet Bell Pepper is a hybrid variety that produces blocky, consistently-sized fruits. The Tiburon Poblano Pepper and Beaver Dam Hot Pepper, although not very hot at all, are some of our favorites for grilling and stuffing. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, the guys talk about green onions or spring onions. Greg has some green onions from his garden that are just starting the bulbing process. At this stage, it is important to provide the onion plants with plenty of water, but not to fertilize them anymore. Once the vegetative stage has ended, the plants will require no more fertilizer and just need ample amounts of water to produce large, sweet onions. Travis shows some of the hybrid varieties that he transplanted such as the Bella Rosa, Mountain Glory, Brickyard, and Sun Gold tomatoes. The guys had pretty good germination on the Bella Rosas and Sun Gold varieties. However, the rats got into the Mountain Glory and Brickyard this year and did not have great success with the germination on those varieties.  They guys show the difference between transplanting tomatoes versus peppers. They transplanted both the tomatoes and peppers at the same time, but the tomatoes are ready to go in the ground and the peppers are not. The peppers are just now popping up in the seed trays because they take longer to germinate than the tomatoes. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about heat-tolerant lettuce varieties and storing seed potatoes that have been cut. Cherokee and Muir lettuce are varieties that have been highly acclaimed by many market farmers and are known to be very heat-resistant. We hope to carry both of these varieties in the near future in pelleted form. Travis says that he does not put lettuce on a seed mat because it germinates fine in the greenhouse during the winter without a seed mat. Greg says when cutting seed potatoes up, he simply puts them in a bucket and leaves them in a dry, cool place. They could be spread on a table or other surface, but we haven't found that to be necessary. Sometimes Travis will dump his into another bucket every other day so they don't get too much moisture at the bottom of the bucket and that will allow them to be equally distributed. Although, not really sure if it truly works it may just be all in Travis's head. Tool of the Week Bayonet Bell Pepper https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_LQtg9_YNl4 Pepper Varieties You Should Be Growing On this week’s episode, Greg and Travis discuss techniques for growing peppers and pepper varieties to plant in the vegetable garden. Pepper seed germination can take a while and will require some patience. Pepper Varieties You Should Be Growing<br /> On this week’s episode, Greg and Travis discuss techniques for growing peppers and pepper varieties to plant in the vegetable garden. Pepper seed germination can take a while and will require some patience. Some varieties will take up to 2 weeks for germination. Hot pepper varieties usually take longer to germinate than sweet pepper varieties. Pepper transplants grow well in our heavy-duty seed starting trays when placed on a heated germination mat. Because pepper seedlings can be quite fragile, we recommend replanting them in 4" pots before transplanting into the ground. This will allow the stem to become stronger and more durable. Large pepper plants will need some form of support to keep them upright and keep fruits off the ground. For just a few plants, we recommend using our smaller Tomato Cages. For many plants or an entire row of peppers, the Florida Weave trellising technique works great. You can use cotton twine or commercial-grade, poly twine for this technique. Our current pepper varieties include Bayonet Bell Pepper, Gold Rush Banana Pepper, Tiburon Poblano Pepper, Beaver Dam Hot Pepper, and many others. Bayonet Bell Pepper is a hybrid variety that produces blocky, consistently-sized fruits. The Tiburon Poblano Pepper and Beaver Dam Hot Pepper, although not very hot at all, are some of our favorites for grilling and stuffing.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, the guys talk about green onions or spring onions. Greg has some green onions from his garden that are just starting the bulbing process. At this stage, it is important to provide the onion plants with plenty of water, but not to fertilize them anymore. Once the vegetative stage has ended, the plants will require no more fertilizer and just need ample amounts of water to produce large, sweet onions. Travis shows some of the hybrid varieties that he transplanted such as the Bella Rosa, Mountain Glory, Brickyard, and Sun Gold tomatoes. The guys had pretty good germination on the Bella Rosas and Sun Gold varieties. However, the rats got into the Mountain Glory and Brickyard this year and did not have great success with the germination on those varieties.  They guys show the difference between transplanting tomatoes versus peppers. They transplanted both the tomatoes and peppers at the same time, but the tomatoes are ready to go in the ground and the peppers are not. The peppers are just now popping up in the seed trays because they take longer to germinate than the tomatoes.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about heat-tolerant lettuce varieties and storing seed potatoes that have been cut. Cherokee and Muir lettuce are varieties that have been highly acclaimed by many market farmers and are known to be very heat-resistant. We hope to carry both of these varieties in the near future in pelleted form. Travis says that he does not put lettuce on a seed mat because it germinates fine in the greenhouse during the winter without a seed mat. Greg says when cutting seed potatoes up, he simply puts them in a bucket and leaves them in a dry, cool place. They could be spread on a table or other surface, but we haven't found that to be necessary. Sometimes Travis will dump his into another bucket every other day so they don't get too much moisture at the bottom of the bucket and that will allow them to be equally distributed. Although, not really sure if it truly works it may just be all in Travis's head.<br /> Tool of the Week<br /> <br /> Bayonet Bell Pepper<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_LQtg9_YNl4 Greg and Travis clean 30:06 Row by Row Episode 43: What You Need to Know Before Growing Vegetable Seedlings https://hosstools.com/vegetable-seedlings/ Thu, 28 Feb 2019 15:03:43 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=44723 Vegetable Seedlings in the Garden On this week’s episode, the guys talk about growing vegetable seedlings in a greenhouse. Greg explains how this can be tough for someone who is at work all day because the greenhouse and the plants inside it will need repeated supervision. Unless some automated systems are used, it's not very realistic for those who are away from home during the day. They discuss how vegetable seedlings need a constant environment and to avoid sudden changes in temperatures. In their greenhouse, this is done by opening the windows based on the outside temperature. They talk about grow lights and how they should be put directly on top of the seed tray initially and slowly elevated as the plants grow. This will prevent plants from becoming leggy as they attempt to climb to the lights. Travis explains that they don't use an automatic watering system, but that those are extremely handy if you're going to be away for a prolonged period of time. He also suggests having a spigot at the greenhouse to better utilize a fertilizer injection tool like their Brass Siphon Mixer. This tool allows you to easily water and fertilize vegetable seedlings simultaneously. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Greg has some English peas that are maturing in his garden. He mentions that the plants are loaded with blooms and he's been harvesting the pods as they are ready. They explain that English peas from the home garden taste so much better than those bought at the store and that they are also great to eat raw. Travis brought a few Bolero carrots from his garden. They are not as large as he would like yet, but they are slowly getting there. They also discuss the taste difference between homegrown carrots and those purchased at the grocery store. Greg has had a little bit of a worm problem on his collards so he sprayed them with some B.t. fertilizer.  The guys are about to start pulling onions in the vegetable garden. When the onions get big enough it can sometimes be hard to get in the garden to clean the area up. However, the guys like to use the Short Single Tine Cultivator which allows you to weed and cultivate in between the onions easily. The guys also look forward to carrying a good supply of elephant garlic and shallots coming this Fall. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, they answer questions about corn earworms and suggested crops for a first-year vegetable garden. Greg explains that planting early is one of the first keys to success against corn earworms. Travis also mentions that applying Spinosad Garden Insect Spray to the silks and tassels a couple of times a week will also take care of the earworm problem. For a first-year vegetable garden, Travis recommends using the KISS principle -- Keep It Simple Stupid. He explains that one should strive to do 3-5 crops really well versus doing 10 crops unsuccessfully. Once you perfect those crops then you can move on to other crops. He suggests growing potatoes, okra, beans, cucumbers, or squash that are relatively easy to grow to start for your first-time growing in the garden. Tool of the Week Short Single Tine Cultivator https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XidQz9NS1BI Vegetable Seedlings in the Garden On this week’s episode, the guys talk about growing vegetable seedlings in a greenhouse. Greg explains how this can be tough for someone who is at work all day because the greenhouse and the plants inside it will need... Vegetable Seedlings in the Garden<br /> On this week’s episode, the guys talk about growing vegetable seedlings in a greenhouse. Greg explains how this can be tough for someone who is at work all day because the greenhouse and the plants inside it will need repeated supervision. Unless some automated systems are used, it's not very realistic for those who are away from home during the day. They discuss how vegetable seedlings need a constant environment and to avoid sudden changes in temperatures. In their greenhouse, this is done by opening the windows based on the outside temperature. They talk about grow lights and how they should be put directly on top of the seed tray initially and slowly elevated as the plants grow. This will prevent plants from becoming leggy as they attempt to climb to the lights. Travis explains that they don't use an automatic watering system, but that those are extremely handy if you're going to be away for a prolonged period of time. He also suggests having a spigot at the greenhouse to better utilize a fertilizer injection tool like their Brass Siphon Mixer. This tool allows you to easily water and fertilize vegetable seedlings simultaneously.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Greg has some English peas that are maturing in his garden. He mentions that the plants are loaded with blooms and he's been harvesting the pods as they are ready. They explain that English peas from the home garden taste so much better than those bought at the store and that they are also great to eat raw. Travis brought a few Bolero carrots from his garden. They are not as large as he would like yet, but they are slowly getting there. They also discuss the taste difference between homegrown carrots and those purchased at the grocery store. Greg has had a little bit of a worm problem on his collards so he sprayed them with some B.t. fertilizer.  The guys are about to start pulling onions in the vegetable garden. When the onions get big enough it can sometimes be hard to get in the garden to clean the area up. However, the guys like to use the Short Single Tine Cultivator which allows you to weed and cultivate in between the onions easily. The guys also look forward to carrying a good supply of elephant garlic and shallots coming this Fall.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, they answer questions about corn earworms and suggested crops for a first-year vegetable garden. Greg explains that planting early is one of the first keys to success against corn earworms. Travis also mentions that applying Spinosad Garden Insect Spray to the silks and tassels a couple of times a week will also take care of the earworm problem. For a first-year vegetable garden, Travis recommends using the KISS principle -- Keep It Simple Stupid. He explains that one should strive to do 3-5 crops really well versus doing 10 crops unsuccessfully. Once you perfect those crops then you can move on to other crops. He suggests growing potatoes, okra, beans, cucumbers, or squash that are relatively easy to grow to start for your first-time growing in the garden.<br /> Tool of the Week<br /> <br /> Short Single Tine Cultivator<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XidQz9NS1BI Greg and Travis clean 32:18 Row by Row Episode 42: The Best Corn Varieties to Grow in a Vegetable Garden https://hosstools.com/corn-varieties/ Thu, 21 Feb 2019 21:02:37 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=44543 Corn in the Vegetable Garden As part of the Poaceae family, Corn has been a staple crop from generation to generation. Pollinated by wind, corn is a heavy feeder and needs lots of space, water, and fertilizer to grow good during the warm season. When growing corn it prefers to grow in well-drained soil that has a pH of 6.0 to 6.8. Depending on the heat temperature and varieties of corn it can take anywhere from 60 to 100 days to harvest in the garden. Sweet Corn Categories and Varieties On this week’s episode, the guys talk about different corn varieties for sweet and field corn. They begin by discussing the different types of sweet corn which are indicated by the genes present. There are three main sweet corn categories based on the genes they have which are su (standard), se (sugary extender) and sh2 (supersweet). There are also varieties with combinations of these genes, which is the case with the Honey Select variety. The su, or standard, varieties include those older cultivars such as Silver Queen, Silver King and Stowell's Evergreen. These varieties have more starch and less sugar as compared to the se and sh2 varieties. The se, or sugary extender, varieties include cultivars such as Ambrosia, Peaches and Cream and Incredible. The sh2, or supersweet, varieties have the highest sugar content and store the longest, but are the most finicky when it comes to germination and planting depth. Greg recommends that beginner gardeners go with one of the su varieties, but that he has grown many of the se varieties in the last few years with great success. They also talk about their field corn varieties which include Jimmy Red, Blue Hopi, Truckers Favorite and Hickory King -- all of which are great for grinding into corn meal and grits. Greg is feeling generous today and gives away some South American Popcorn seed to the first 10 viewers that send us an email. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment this week, the guys sample a couple of beets from Travis' garden. Travis mentions that a customer recently asked him about the taste difference between red and golden beets. To help answer the question, he brought a Merlin beet and a Touchstone Gold beet from his vegetable garden. After sampling, the guys both agreed that the Merlin beet has a sweeter flavor and higher sugar content, but that they are both delicious and fun to grow. Greg has lots growing in the garden right now. He has kohlrabi, tiger collards, English peas, onions, and shallots all growing really good in the vegetable garden this season. Greg and Travis also hope to get some of there potatoes in the garden this weekend since potato planting season is right around the corner. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about pickling okra and planting asparagus or strawberries in their garden. Greg brought a book called "The Pickled Pantry" and agrees to send it to the viewer who asked the question. He mentions that the book contains several great pickled okra recipes that he's tried that have had great success. He has liked one of the sweet and one of the spicy recipes in the book. Travis explains that they have several beds of asparagus growing behind the warehouse for a long time. They guys also have a couple of asparagus growing videos on their YouTube Channel. Greg has been doing some research on strawberries so maybe we will add those to our seed lineup in the near future. Tool of the Week Premium Corn Seed Mockmill Stone Grain Mill https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AklFnTNpOSo Corn in the Vegetable Garden As part of the Poaceae family, Corn has been a staple crop from generation to generation. Pollinated by wind, corn is a heavy feeder and needs lots of space, water, and fertilizer to grow good during the warm season. Corn in the Vegetable Garden<br /> As part of the Poaceae family, Corn has been a staple crop from generation to generation. Pollinated by wind, corn is a heavy feeder and needs lots of space, water, and fertilizer to grow good during the warm season. When growing corn it prefers to grow in well-drained soil that has a pH of 6.0 to 6.8. Depending on the heat temperature and varieties of corn it can take anywhere from 60 to 100 days to harvest in the garden.<br /> Sweet Corn Categories and Varieties<br /> On this week’s episode, the guys talk about different corn varieties for sweet and field corn. They begin by discussing the different types of sweet corn which are indicated by the genes present. There are three main sweet corn categories based on the genes they have which are su (standard), se (sugary extender) and sh2 (supersweet). There are also varieties with combinations of these genes, which is the case with the Honey Select variety. The su, or standard, varieties include those older cultivars such as Silver Queen, Silver King and Stowell's Evergreen. These varieties have more starch and less sugar as compared to the se and sh2 varieties. The se, or sugary extender, varieties include cultivars such as Ambrosia, Peaches and Cream and Incredible. The sh2, or supersweet, varieties have the highest sugar content and store the longest, but are the most finicky when it comes to germination and planting depth. Greg recommends that beginner gardeners go with one of the su varieties, but that he has grown many of the se varieties in the last few years with great success. They also talk about their field corn varieties which include Jimmy Red, Blue Hopi, Truckers Favorite and Hickory King -- all of which are great for grinding into corn meal and grits. Greg is feeling generous today and gives away some South American Popcorn seed to the first 10 viewers that send us an email.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment this week, the guys sample a couple of beets from Travis' garden. Travis mentions that a customer recently asked him about the taste difference between red and golden beets. To help answer the question, he brought a Merlin beet and a Touchstone Gold beet from his vegetable garden. After sampling, the guys both agreed that the Merlin beet has a sweeter flavor and higher sugar content, but that they are both delicious and fun to grow. Greg has lots growing in the garden right now. He has kohlrabi, tiger collards, English peas, onions, and shallots all growing really good in the vegetable garden this season. Greg and Travis also hope to get some of there potatoes in the garden this weekend since potato planting season is right around the corner.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about pickling okra and planting asparagus or strawberries in their garden. Greg brought a book called "The Pickled Pantry" and agrees to send it to the viewer who asked the question. He mentions that the book contains several great pickled okra recipes that he's tried that have had great success. He has liked one of the sweet and one of the spicy recipes in the book. Travis explains that they have several beds of asparagus growing behind the warehouse for a long time. They guys also have a couple of asparagus growing videos on their YouTube Channel. Greg has been doing some research on strawberries so maybe we will add those to our seed lineup in the near future.<br /> Tool of the Week<br /> <br /> Premium Corn Seed<br /> Mockmill Stone Grain Mill<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AklFnTNpOSo Greg and Travis clean 26:36 Row by Row Episode 41: The Best Vegetable Garden Design https://hosstools.com/garden-design/ Thu, 14 Feb 2019 20:42:06 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=44320 Vegetable Garden Designing On this week’s episode, the guys talk about their vegetable garden designs and what they plan to plant, how much, and where they plan to plant crops for their spring gardens this year. Travis has a sketch of his new 1/4 acre garden plot that they prepared using a tractor harrow and chisel plow last weekend. He mentioned that he will still need to till the area once and get the soil pH tested, but once he does that it should be ready to plant for the spring. Greg and Travis discuss the importance of having a garden design that is broken up into subplots, as opposed to having one large continuous garden. The subplot design makes it easier to compartmentalize certain crops and makes it easier to practice proper crop rotation. Travis mentions that his new garden area consists of six subplots that are each 30' x 35' and his pathways are 10-foot wide. He prefers square plots because it is easier for crop rotation and to attract pollinators. Greg shows a sketch of his garden area where there are 7 subplots that vary in size slightly. He has a slight problem with the walkways being 6-foot which in hindsight could have been a little bit longer. As of right now, he has cover crops in this garden plot that he will soon be incorporating into the soil to help build soil nutrients and prepare the plot for the spring crops. They both talk about the importance of having walkways between the plots, and they prefer grass walkways over wood chips. Overall, the subplots make for a more manageable garden which allows you to have proper crop rotation and breaks up your fertilizing and watering to different sections in the garden. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, the guys share a bulb of raw kohlrabi from Travis' garden. Travis mentions how he prefers to eat the kohlrabi raw, but that it also tastes great when cooked. You can eat the leaves on Kohlrabi, but the guys have not tried that out yet. Greg is having a little problem in the greenhouse with mice eating on his pepper seeds, but he plans to take care of those this afternoon. They discuss how they've recently started pepper, tomato and eggplant seedlings for spring. Travis talks about some of our Gardening Gloves that are extremely comfortable and will fit your hands nicely unlike any others you can find at the store. Greg also talks about a new product in their seed line, Wynne Peanut. He explains that this is an improved variety with excellent disease resistance, high oleic acid content, and great storage potential. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about tomatoes splitting and tomato trellising stakes. Greg mentions that tomatoes will split as a result of excess moisture or irregular watering. Also, some newer varieties are not prone to split as bad as the old heirloom varieties. He suggests picking a newer variety that is not prone to splitting. Also, apply a drip irrigation system that allows for more consistent watering, but if the excess water is a result of rainfall, there's not much you can do. He does explain that the hybrid, round varieties are less susceptible to splitting as compared to the heirloom varieties. Travis states that he prefers t-posts and wooden stakes for his Florida Weave tomato trellising. While the t-posts are a bit of an upfront investment, the wooden stakes can be easily found and will last for several years before needing replacement. Tool of the Week Hoss Gardening Gloves Hoss Garden Seeder https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H8h2DAmhpt4 Vegetable Garden Designing On this week’s episode, the guys talk about their vegetable garden designs and what they plan to plant, how much, and where they plan to plant crops for their spring gardens this year. Vegetable Garden Designing<br /> On this week’s episode, the guys talk about their vegetable garden designs and what they plan to plant, how much, and where they plan to plant crops for their spring gardens this year. Travis has a sketch of his new 1/4 acre garden plot that they prepared using a tractor harrow and chisel plow last weekend. He mentioned that he will still need to till the area once and get the soil pH tested, but once he does that it should be ready to plant for the spring. Greg and Travis discuss the importance of having a garden design that is broken up into subplots, as opposed to having one large continuous garden. The subplot design makes it easier to compartmentalize certain crops and makes it easier to practice proper crop rotation. Travis mentions that his new garden area consists of six subplots that are each 30' x 35' and his pathways are 10-foot wide. He prefers square plots because it is easier for crop rotation and to attract pollinators. Greg shows a sketch of his garden area where there are 7 subplots that vary in size slightly. He has a slight problem with the walkways being 6-foot which in hindsight could have been a little bit longer. As of right now, he has cover crops in this garden plot that he will soon be incorporating into the soil to help build soil nutrients and prepare the plot for the spring crops. They both talk about the importance of having walkways between the plots, and they prefer grass walkways over wood chips. Overall, the subplots make for a more manageable garden which allows you to have proper crop rotation and breaks up your fertilizing and watering to different sections in the garden.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, the guys share a bulb of raw kohlrabi from Travis' garden. Travis mentions how he prefers to eat the kohlrabi raw, but that it also tastes great when cooked. You can eat the leaves on Kohlrabi, but the guys have not tried that out yet. Greg is having a little problem in the greenhouse with mice eating on his pepper seeds, but he plans to take care of those this afternoon. They discuss how they've recently started pepper, tomato and eggplant seedlings for spring. Travis talks about some of our Gardening Gloves that are extremely comfortable and will fit your hands nicely unlike any others you can find at the store. Greg also talks about a new product in their seed line, Wynne Peanut. He explains that this is an improved variety with excellent disease resistance, high oleic acid content, and great storage potential.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about tomatoes splitting and tomato trellising stakes. Greg mentions that tomatoes will split as a result of excess moisture or irregular watering. Also, some newer varieties are not prone to split as bad as the old heirloom varieties. He suggests picking a newer variety that is not prone to splitting. Also, apply a drip irrigation system that allows for more consistent watering, but if the excess water is a result of rainfall, there's not much you can do. He does explain that the hybrid, round varieties are less susceptible to splitting as compared to the heirloom varieties. Travis states that he prefers t-posts and wooden stakes for his Florida Weave tomato trellising. While the t-posts are a bit of an upfront investment, the wooden stakes can be easily found and will last for several years before needing replacement.<br /> Tool of the Week<br /> <br /> Hoss Gardening Gloves<br /> Hoss Garden Seeder<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H8h2DAmhpt4 Greg and Travis clean 29:14 Row by Row Episode 40: The Best Tips for Growing Tomatoes https://hosstools.com/growing-tomatoes/ Wed, 06 Feb 2019 21:39:48 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=44037 Tips and Tricks for Tomato Growing On this week’s episode, the guys talk about growing tomatoes in the vegetable garden. They mention that tomatoes are one of the most popular crops in vegetable gardens across the world, but that they can also be one of the most challenging to grow. They like to plan they're planting just right so the tomatoes start in the seed starting trays and then go directly into the garden. They first discuss the different varieties that are available, including heirloom and hybrid variations. Heirlooms, while beautiful and delicious, can be highly susceptible to diseases. Meanwhile, the hybrids provide a more consistent appearance and are resistant to troublesome diseases like tomato spotted wilt virus. They suggest growing tomatoes like Bella Rosa, Mountain Glory and Brickyard for disease-resistance and improved yields. They explain why growing your own plants is a much better option than purchasing them at a store. They also explain that the size of the transplant has nothing to do with how well the plant will do once planted in the ground. They discuss trellising techniques including cages and using twine to do the Florida Weave. Some of the tomato varieties can get huge so having a trellis technique will help the crops stay off the ground. Travis suggests using cages for indeterminate varieties and the Florida Weave for determinate varieties. We have several videos on the Florida Weave Trellis on our YouTube channel. Finally, they explain the importance of adequate calcium when growing tomatoes. Supplementing calcium by adding Pelletized Gypsum will help to prevent blossom end rot, which is caused by a calcium deficiency. Travis likes to add the gypsum when he plants them in the ground, but Greg likes to do it a week or two before the first bloom set. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Travis has some Butter Crunch Lettuce that has a nice large head on them and says that they have great field holding ability in the cooler months. He also talks a little bit about the new hybrid variety, Harmony Butterhead Lettuce which has excellent production and is a pelleted seed. Greg has a Watermelon Radish that he grew in the vegetable garden. The guys cut into the radish to taste test and observe the bright pink to purple coloration on the inside of the radish root. Travis mentions that watermelon radish, also called red meat radish, tends to be less spicy than traditional radishes. They also take longer to grow but are less susceptible to splitting as they get larger. The weather is starting to warm up a little bit and the cover crops are paying off. Travis also shows a sneak peek of the final prototype of our new Hoss Stirrup Hoe. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about lunar planting and the difference between ammonium nitrate and Chilean Nitrate. Travis explains that the concept of lunar planting is a myth or "old wives' tale," and that potatoes will grow regardless of the moon phase. He suggests planting potatoes as soon as your climate or soil conditions will allow, and not wait on the moon for planting. Greg explains that Chilean Nitrate is an organic product that is naturally mined in Chile, while ammonium nitrate is a chemically produced fertilizer. While they have a very similar action in the soil, one is naturally-derived and the other isn't. Ammonium nitrate is a lot more powerful so they are apt to burn more than the Chilean nitrate in the garden. Tool of the Week Watermelon Radish Skyphos Butterhead Lettuce https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7nFFG4_HenU Tips and Tricks for Tomato Growing On this week’s episode, the guys talk about growing tomatoes in the vegetable garden. They mention that tomatoes are one of the most popular crops in vegetable gardens across the world, Tips and Tricks for Tomato Growing<br /> On this week’s episode, the guys talk about growing tomatoes in the vegetable garden. They mention that tomatoes are one of the most popular crops in vegetable gardens across the world, but that they can also be one of the most challenging to grow. They like to plan they're planting just right so the tomatoes start in the seed starting trays and then go directly into the garden. They first discuss the different varieties that are available, including heirloom and hybrid variations. Heirlooms, while beautiful and delicious, can be highly susceptible to diseases. Meanwhile, the hybrids provide a more consistent appearance and are resistant to troublesome diseases like tomato spotted wilt virus. They suggest growing tomatoes like Bella Rosa, Mountain Glory and Brickyard for disease-resistance and improved yields. They explain why growing your own plants is a much better option than purchasing them at a store. They also explain that the size of the transplant has nothing to do with how well the plant will do once planted in the ground. They discuss trellising techniques including cages and using twine to do the Florida Weave. Some of the tomato varieties can get huge so having a trellis technique will help the crops stay off the ground. Travis suggests using cages for indeterminate varieties and the Florida Weave for determinate varieties. We have several videos on the Florida Weave Trellis on our YouTube channel. Finally, they explain the importance of adequate calcium when growing tomatoes. Supplementing calcium by adding Pelletized Gypsum will help to prevent blossom end rot, which is caused by a calcium deficiency. Travis likes to add the gypsum when he plants them in the ground, but Greg likes to do it a week or two before the first bloom set.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Travis has some Butter Crunch Lettuce that has a nice large head on them and says that they have great field holding ability in the cooler months. He also talks a little bit about the new hybrid variety, Harmony Butterhead Lettuce which has excellent production and is a pelleted seed. Greg has a Watermelon Radish that he grew in the vegetable garden. The guys cut into the radish to taste test and observe the bright pink to purple coloration on the inside of the radish root. Travis mentions that watermelon radish, also called red meat radish, tends to be less spicy than traditional radishes. They also take longer to grow but are less susceptible to splitting as they get larger. The weather is starting to warm up a little bit and the cover crops are paying off. Travis also shows a sneak peek of the final prototype of our new Hoss Stirrup Hoe.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about lunar planting and the difference between ammonium nitrate and Chilean Nitrate. Travis explains that the concept of lunar planting is a myth or "old wives' tale," and that potatoes will grow regardless of the moon phase. He suggests planting potatoes as soon as your climate or soil conditions will allow, and not wait on the moon for planting. Greg explains that Chilean Nitrate is an organic product that is naturally mined in Chile, while ammonium nitrate is a chemically produced fertilizer. While they have a very similar action in the soil, one is naturally-derived and the other isn't. Ammonium nitrate is a lot more powerful so they are apt to burn more than the Chilean nitrate in the garden.<br /> Tool of the Week<br /> <br /> Watermelon Radish<br /> Skyphos Butterhead Lettuce<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7nFFG4_HenU Greg and Travis clean 33:28 Row by Row Episode 39: The Best Tips for Growing a Huge Potato Harvest https://hosstools.com/potato-harvest/ Wed, 06 Feb 2019 21:38:00 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=44035 Increasing Your Potato Harvest On this week’s episode, the guys discuss their favorite tips and practices for growing a huge potato harvest. They walk through the four varieties of seed potatoes that they now carry, which include Yukon Gold, Red Norland, Adirondack Blue, and German Butterball. They mention how some varieties are early-maturing and others are late-maturing, and that this should be taken into consideration when planting. They suggest planting potatoes 3-4 weeks before the last frost date in spring. For their planting zone, which is zone 8, the ideal planting time is Valentines Day throughout the end of February. They talk about cutting potatoes to get more from the seed potatoes purchased. They suggest cutting the seed potatoes so that there are 2-3 eyes on each piece. Seed potatoes should be cut several days before the intended planting date, because they need time to suberize or heal. This will prevent the potatoes from rotting in the ground, making them less susceptible to fungal disease in the soil, and provide a better potato harvest in the end. They mention that the Hoss Double or High Arch Wheel Hoe with the Plow Set attachment is the perfect tool for planting potatoes. The Plow Set allows you to make a planting furrow and cover the potatoes easily, just by pushing the wheel hoe along the row. Hilling, or covering the plants with soil, will also ensure a large potato harvest. This should be done every 2-3 weeks as the plants grow, leaving just a few leaves uncovered. To decrease issues with blight causing problems with foliage on your potato plants you should apply a fungicide. Greg recommends using Liquid Copper Fungicide to help with your blight problems. It is very weather resistant and sticks to the plant once it dries out leaving lasting control. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Greg shows the preferred size that he likes when harvesting his Skyphos Butterhead Lettuce, which is an open-pollinated variety. He also brought some Daikon radishes that he grew as a cover crop in his vegetable garden. Although these were grown as a cover crop, they are also great to eat and are considered a high-demand crop in some markets. Travis explains why Tillage Radish works so well as a cover crop. The long roots penetrate deeply into the soil, providing aeration and reducing soil compaction. The roots also sequester nutrients from deep and store them so that they are available to the upper soil layer when they are incorporated or tilled into the soil. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about harvesting peppers and growing onions from seed. Travis suggests two techniques to help when you are adding trellis to the plants get the string on the main stem of the plant so it won't smush all the leaves together. The other suggestion is growing peppers in cages to provide more airflow, allow leaves to spread, and decreases disease problems in the garden. This will also help to prevent fruit from being stuck in the middle of the plant and being inaccessible for harvest. Greg explains that onion plants can be grown from seed in the greenhouse, but that it is much easier to just purchase plants from companies like Dixondale. Tool of the Week Tillage Radish https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T90Kq2XgEPU Increasing Your Potato Harvest On this week’s episode, the guys discuss their favorite tips and practices for growing a huge potato harvest. They walk through the four varieties of seed potatoes that they now carry, which include Yukon Gold, Increasing Your Potato Harvest<br /> On this week’s episode, the guys discuss their favorite tips and practices for growing a huge potato harvest. They walk through the four varieties of seed potatoes that they now carry, which include Yukon Gold, Red Norland, Adirondack Blue, and German Butterball. They mention how some varieties are early-maturing and others are late-maturing, and that this should be taken into consideration when planting. They suggest planting potatoes 3-4 weeks before the last frost date in spring. For their planting zone, which is zone 8, the ideal planting time is Valentines Day throughout the end of February. They talk about cutting potatoes to get more from the seed potatoes purchased. They suggest cutting the seed potatoes so that there are 2-3 eyes on each piece. Seed potatoes should be cut several days before the intended planting date, because they need time to suberize or heal. This will prevent the potatoes from rotting in the ground, making them less susceptible to fungal disease in the soil, and provide a better potato harvest in the end. They mention that the Hoss Double or High Arch Wheel Hoe with the Plow Set attachment is the perfect tool for planting potatoes. The Plow Set allows you to make a planting furrow and cover the potatoes easily, just by pushing the wheel hoe along the row. Hilling, or covering the plants with soil, will also ensure a large potato harvest. This should be done every 2-3 weeks as the plants grow, leaving just a few leaves uncovered. To decrease issues with blight causing problems with foliage on your potato plants you should apply a fungicide. Greg recommends using Liquid Copper Fungicide to help with your blight problems. It is very weather resistant and sticks to the plant once it dries out leaving lasting control.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Greg shows the preferred size that he likes when harvesting his Skyphos Butterhead Lettuce, which is an open-pollinated variety. He also brought some Daikon radishes that he grew as a cover crop in his vegetable garden. Although these were grown as a cover crop, they are also great to eat and are considered a high-demand crop in some markets. Travis explains why Tillage Radish works so well as a cover crop. The long roots penetrate deeply into the soil, providing aeration and reducing soil compaction. The roots also sequester nutrients from deep and store them so that they are available to the upper soil layer when they are incorporated or tilled into the soil.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about harvesting peppers and growing onions from seed. Travis suggests two techniques to help when you are adding trellis to the plants get the string on the main stem of the plant so it won't smush all the leaves together. The other suggestion is growing peppers in cages to provide more airflow, allow leaves to spread, and decreases disease problems in the garden. This will also help to prevent fruit from being stuck in the middle of the plant and being inaccessible for harvest. Greg explains that onion plants can be grown from seed in the greenhouse, but that it is much easier to just purchase plants from companies like Dixondale.<br /> Tool of the Week<br /> <br /> Tillage Radish<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T90Kq2XgEPU Greg and Travis clean 33:22 Row by Row Episode 38: Succession Planting to Grow Food Year Round https://hosstools.com/succession-planting/ Thu, 31 Jan 2019 20:32:05 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=43901 Tips for Succession Planting Year Round On this week’s episode, the guys talk about succession planting crops in the vegetable garden for continual harvests throughout the respective growing season for a particular crop. Succession planting is an effective strategy for one-time harvest crops or crops that are continually harvested throughout the growing season. They first discuss succession planting with cool-season crops like lettuce, kohlrabi, beets, broccoli, cauliflower, and cabbage. All crops that mature fast so around 50 days or less. Travis mentions that he likes to succession plant these on 1-month intervals. This means that he will start seeds for these crops every 4 weeks and always have them in the garden throughout the fall and winter growing seasons. In the cooler seasons, crops are less likely to bolt and will hold better in the field. This allows one to harvest vegetables as they need them, instead of having to harvest the entire crop at one time. They also talk about succession planting warm-season crops that decline in production as the plant's age. They specifically mention okra and squash, which tend to be less productive once the plants reach a certain age. To keep that continual high-productivity in their gardens, they will succession plant okra and squash every couple of months to ensure that they have those crops producing throughout the warm growing season. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Greg has a head of Skyphos lettuce from his garden. Skyphos is a variety of red butterhead lettuce that does really well for them. They have it available in a pelleted seed form which makes it easy to singulate when planting in seed trays. They also show some seed potatoes that they are now carrying on their website. They have four different varieties which include Yukon Gold, Red Norland, Adirondack Blue, and German Butterball. Greg shows several different varieties of shallots. Shallots are a part of the Onion family but have a different species which is allium. They show off a Banana variety that is long and slender. Most people cook this variety by roasting them. Greg is going to plant a few different varieties and test which ones he likes best. When growing shallots they are believed to be less dependent on daylength, unlike onions. However, when storing shallots they store away just like onions do. After testing these shallots out this year, we hope to carry them along with some more seeds in the near future on the website. The guys also show off their new favorite Hoss Gardening gloves which offer comfort, durability, and flexibility. They come in two different colors: Hoss red and kind of pastel green color. We also have different sizes of these gloves for everyone to use in the garden. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys talk about some upcoming seed varieties that will be posted on the website soon. These include a couple of new varieties of beets. One of the beet varieties called Solo and it is a monogerm variety, which means it does not require thinning like the multigerm varieties. They also have a new beet variety named Kestrel which offers superior disease-resistance and uniformity. Also, some more cucumber and lettuce varieties like the Stonewall and the Calypso and pelleted lettuce seed like Harmony and Calshot. Travis talks about a new variety of sweet corn called Temptress which is what they call a "quad sweet". The "quad sweet" means that it has the heirloom flavor with the modern corn sweetness. Overall, lots of great productive varieties coming to the Hoss Tools website soon. Tool of the Week Skyphos Butterhead Lettuce https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rwwATthMDHw Tips for Succession Planting Year Round On this week’s episode, the guys talk about succession planting crops in the vegetable garden for continual harvests throughout the respective growing season for a particular crop. Tips for Succession Planting Year Round<br /> On this week’s episode, the guys talk about succession planting crops in the vegetable garden for continual harvests throughout the respective growing season for a particular crop. Succession planting is an effective strategy for one-time harvest crops or crops that are continually harvested throughout the growing season. They first discuss succession planting with cool-season crops like lettuce, kohlrabi, beets, broccoli, cauliflower, and cabbage. All crops that mature fast so around 50 days or less. Travis mentions that he likes to succession plant these on 1-month intervals. This means that he will start seeds for these crops every 4 weeks and always have them in the garden throughout the fall and winter growing seasons. In the cooler seasons, crops are less likely to bolt and will hold better in the field. This allows one to harvest vegetables as they need them, instead of having to harvest the entire crop at one time. They also talk about succession planting warm-season crops that decline in production as the plant's age. They specifically mention okra and squash, which tend to be less productive once the plants reach a certain age. To keep that continual high-productivity in their gardens, they will succession plant okra and squash every couple of months to ensure that they have those crops producing throughout the warm growing season.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Greg has a head of Skyphos lettuce from his garden. Skyphos is a variety of red butterhead lettuce that does really well for them. They have it available in a pelleted seed form which makes it easy to singulate when planting in seed trays. They also show some seed potatoes that they are now carrying on their website. They have four different varieties which include Yukon Gold, Red Norland, Adirondack Blue, and German Butterball. Greg shows several different varieties of shallots. Shallots are a part of the Onion family but have a different species which is allium. They show off a Banana variety that is long and slender. Most people cook this variety by roasting them. Greg is going to plant a few different varieties and test which ones he likes best. When growing shallots they are believed to be less dependent on daylength, unlike onions. However, when storing shallots they store away just like onions do. After testing these shallots out this year, we hope to carry them along with some more seeds in the near future on the website. The guys also show off their new favorite Hoss Gardening gloves which offer comfort, durability, and flexibility. They come in two different colors: Hoss red and kind of pastel green color. We also have different sizes of these gloves for everyone to use in the garden.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys talk about some upcoming seed varieties that will be posted on the website soon. These include a couple of new varieties of beets. One of the beet varieties called Solo and it is a monogerm variety, which means it does not require thinning like the multigerm varieties. They also have a new beet variety named Kestrel which offers superior disease-resistance and uniformity. Also, some more cucumber and lettuce varieties like the Stonewall and the Calypso and pelleted lettuce seed like Harmony and Calshot. Travis talks about a new variety of sweet corn called Temptress which is what they call a "quad sweet". The "quad sweet" means that it has the heirloom flavor with the modern corn sweetness. Overall, lots of great productive varieties coming to the Hoss Tools website soon.<br /> Tool of the Week<br /> <br /> Skyphos Butterhead Lettuce<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rwwATthMDHw Greg and Travis clean 29:18 Row by Row Episode 37: Hybrid vs. Heirloom Seeds – Which is Better? https://hosstools.com/heirloom-seed-vs-hybrid-seed/ Thu, 31 Jan 2019 19:39:47 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=43898 Hybrid vs. Heirloom Seeds On this week’s episode, the guys talk about vegetable seed and the differences between hybrid, heirloom and GMO seed. They first define heirloom seed as those that have been passed from generation to generation back in the early 1900s. Heirloom plants are open-pollinated, which means that seed can be saved and used for the next year's crop. Some heirlooms are locally adapted to handle certain disease or pest pressures, which is certainly an advantage. Greg is a big believer in that heirloom corn has more disease, insect, and drought resistance than the hybrid varieties. One misconception about heirloom seed is that they have better taste or flavor than hybrid varieties. They say that the hybrid varieties were made for more production than taste, unlike the heirlooms. Greg and Travis believe that this is not 100% true. While the heirlooms may have a more unique shape, many of the modern-day hybrid seeds offer superb flavor comparable to that of heirlooms. Artificial and natural selection has two different meanings. Artificial selection or hybridizing means that humans have been involved and they had control in selecting things to happen. Natural selection has to do with nature taking its own course of action without any human interaction with it. They talk about hybrid seeds being the result of a cross-breeding between two related varieties. With hybrids, all of the first generation (F1) plants are the same. However, hybrid seeds cannot be reliably saved because the F2 individuals will not be true to variety. Hybrid seeds are great because they usually offer increased disease or pest-resistance and increased productivity. Hybrids allow you to get a certain selection done that have a particular outcome of the varieties. Finally, they discuss how GMO seeds are manufactured and address the ecological ramifications of seeds that allow the widespread use of non-selective herbicides. Genetically modified organism (GMO) is when you take a gene from an unrelated species or nonplant organism and isolate that gene based on the trait you are looking for. Then, you take that gene and insert it into the plant so that plant carries the same trait. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Travis has a head of Butter Crunch Lettuce that he harvested earlier that day. He mentions the butterhead lettuce is his favorite because it has such a smooth texture and rich flavor. Butterhead lettuce is great for making wraps with shrimp, chicken or pork. Greg has been harvesting some radishes out of his vegetable garden. If you do not like the radishes spiciness a lot of people like to saute them instead of eating them raw. He has a watermelon radish that has a little split which can be caused by too much water or they have grown too large. A tip when storing away radishes you can snap the leaves off of them and place them in a little bag and they will store in the refrigerator nicely. Travis has some Joi Choi Chinese Cabbage that grows nice little heads and has great taste. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about knife sharpening and the cost of hybrid seeds. Greg mentions that a leather strop is his favorite device for sharpening a knife. As long as the blade is not extremely dull, it can work to shape fairly easily with a leather strop and sharpening compound. Travis mentions that hybrids seeds are usually more expensive because they are more costly to produce. They are also usually better quality seed because they have been bred for disease-resistance or high productivity. Tool of the Week Butter Crunch Lettuce https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ktzggaZTmnI Hybrid vs. Heirloom Seeds On this week’s episode, the guys talk about vegetable seed and the differences between hybrid, heirloom and GMO seed. They first define heirloom seed as those that have been passed from generation to generation back in the ea... Hybrid vs. Heirloom Seeds<br /> On this week’s episode, the guys talk about vegetable seed and the differences between hybrid, heirloom and GMO seed. They first define heirloom seed as those that have been passed from generation to generation back in the early 1900s. Heirloom plants are open-pollinated, which means that seed can be saved and used for the next year's crop. Some heirlooms are locally adapted to handle certain disease or pest pressures, which is certainly an advantage. Greg is a big believer in that heirloom corn has more disease, insect, and drought resistance than the hybrid varieties. One misconception about heirloom seed is that they have better taste or flavor than hybrid varieties. They say that the hybrid varieties were made for more production than taste, unlike the heirlooms. Greg and Travis believe that this is not 100% true. While the heirlooms may have a more unique shape, many of the modern-day hybrid seeds offer superb flavor comparable to that of heirlooms. Artificial and natural selection has two different meanings. Artificial selection or hybridizing means that humans have been involved and they had control in selecting things to happen. Natural selection has to do with nature taking its own course of action without any human interaction with it. They talk about hybrid seeds being the result of a cross-breeding between two related varieties. With hybrids, all of the first generation (F1) plants are the same. However, hybrid seeds cannot be reliably saved because the F2 individuals will not be true to variety. Hybrid seeds are great because they usually offer increased disease or pest-resistance and increased productivity. Hybrids allow you to get a certain selection done that have a particular outcome of the varieties. Finally, they discuss how GMO seeds are manufactured and address the ecological ramifications of seeds that allow the widespread use of non-selective herbicides. Genetically modified organism (GMO) is when you take a gene from an unrelated species or nonplant organism and isolate that gene based on the trait you are looking for. Then, you take that gene and insert it into the plant so that plant carries the same trait.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Travis has a head of Butter Crunch Lettuce that he harvested earlier that day. He mentions the butterhead lettuce is his favorite because it has such a smooth texture and rich flavor. Butterhead lettuce is great for making wraps with shrimp, chicken or pork. Greg has been harvesting some radishes out of his vegetable garden. If you do not like the radishes spiciness a lot of people like to saute them instead of eating them raw. He has a watermelon radish that has a little split which can be caused by too much water or they have grown too large. A tip when storing away radishes you can snap the leaves off of them and place them in a little bag and they will store in the refrigerator nicely. Travis has some Joi Choi Chinese Cabbage that grows nice little heads and has great taste.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about knife sharpening and the cost of hybrid seeds. Greg mentions that a leather strop is his favorite device for sharpening a knife. As long as the blade is not extremely dull, it can work to shape fairly easily with a leather strop and sharpening compound. Travis mentions that hybrids seeds are usually more expensive because they are more costly to produce. They are also usually better quality seed because they have been bred for disease-resistance or high productivity.<br /> Tool of the Week<br /> <br /> Butter Crunch Lettuce<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ktzggaZTmnI Greg and Travis clean 35:04 Row by Row Episode 36: The Best Knives for Gardening and Homesteading https://hosstools.com/best-knives/ Wed, 30 Jan 2019 04:54:41 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=43865 Best Knives for Gardening and Harvesting On this week’s episode, the guys talk about the best knives for gardening and general use around the homestead. They each chose five of their favorite knives that they use frequently around their garden and farm. They first talk about the different types of metal present on modern-day knives and discuss the differences between high-carbon steel and stainless steel. They mention that high-carbon steel is your older type steels that are easier to sharpen, but requires more maintenance and care. The high-performance stainless steels, which have become increasingly popular as of late, are great but can take longer to sharpen because the metal is harder. The Bushlore Knife has a walnut handle and 1080 high carbon steel. Similar to the Bushlore is our smaller Sapien Knife that is high carbon steel also. The guys talk a little bit about the Old Hickory knives that are made for harvesting and for kitchen or food preparation. These knives include the cabbage knife which is made for cutting greens, lettuce, or cabbage. Similar to the cabbage knife is the California knife. Travis' favorite knives include the ESEE-3, the Morakniv Craftline, the Kershaw Leek and his newly acquired Benchmade 940. Greg's favorite knives include Buck folders and several made by Bark River Knives. They conclude that the Kershaw Leek and the Bushlore Knife are the best two knives for the money. Show and Tell Segment On the Show & Tell segment, Travis has a head of Parris Island Romaine Lettuce that he grew in his vegetable garden. He recently sprinkled some Chilean Nitrate and used his Hoss Wheel Hoe to cultivate alongside the row and that's when his lettuce really started taking off. They give the lettuce a taste test and talk about the flavor compared to traditional iceberg lettuce. Greg mentions that romaine is his favorite type of lettuce to grow. They discuss how romaine is great for making Caesar salads or using for lettuce wraps with chicken, pork or shrimp. They talk about when using hybrid seeds you should make sure that you put one per seed tray. Greg prefers to seed by hand because it is a lot easier with those pelleted seeds. Greg shows his little mini greenhouse that he has a rooted fig cutting in that they had previously demonstrated on a video. It has some buddings and he will soon move it out to the greenhouse. They guys also discuss a little bit about the new seed room and the new products that will becoming to the Hoss Tools website very soon. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, they answer questions about starting spring crops in seed trays and the frequency at which soil samples should be taken in the garden. They explain that they usually start spring transplants around early to mid-February. Some spring transplants would include tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, okra, and watermelons. Travis does not recommend transplanting squash in the seed trays because they may experience some transplant shock. Greg explains soil sampling and suggests that the potassium, or "potash", levels shouldn't change much between winter and spring. He explains that potash is a little bit mobile in the soil so when doing an application of potash you should do it pre-plant a couple of three weeks before planting. Greg recommends not sampling the soil again as those nutrients should still be there for spring planting. Always remember when doing a soil sample and reading your phosphorous, potassium, and nitrogen levels you should apply them two to three weeks before planting not three or four months in advance. Tool of the Week Bushlore Garden Knife https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NgB4iD_2tmk Best Knives for Gardening and Harvesting On this week’s episode, the guys talk about the best knives for gardening and general use around the homestead. They each chose five of their favorite knives that they use frequently around their garden and far... Best Knives for Gardening and Harvesting<br /> On this week’s episode, the guys talk about the best knives for gardening and general use around the homestead. They each chose five of their favorite knives that they use frequently around their garden and farm. They first talk about the different types of metal present on modern-day knives and discuss the differences between high-carbon steel and stainless steel. They mention that high-carbon steel is your older type steels that are easier to sharpen, but requires more maintenance and care. The high-performance stainless steels, which have become increasingly popular as of late, are great but can take longer to sharpen because the metal is harder. The Bushlore Knife has a walnut handle and 1080 high carbon steel. Similar to the Bushlore is our smaller Sapien Knife that is high carbon steel also. The guys talk a little bit about the Old Hickory knives that are made for harvesting and for kitchen or food preparation. These knives include the cabbage knife which is made for cutting greens, lettuce, or cabbage. Similar to the cabbage knife is the California knife. Travis' favorite knives include the ESEE-3, the Morakniv Craftline, the Kershaw Leek and his newly acquired Benchmade 940. Greg's favorite knives include Buck folders and several made by Bark River Knives. They conclude that the Kershaw Leek and the Bushlore Knife are the best two knives for the money.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the Show & Tell segment, Travis has a head of Parris Island Romaine Lettuce that he grew in his vegetable garden. He recently sprinkled some Chilean Nitrate and used his Hoss Wheel Hoe to cultivate alongside the row and that's when his lettuce really started taking off. They give the lettuce a taste test and talk about the flavor compared to traditional iceberg lettuce. Greg mentions that romaine is his favorite type of lettuce to grow. They discuss how romaine is great for making Caesar salads or using for lettuce wraps with chicken, pork or shrimp. They talk about when using hybrid seeds you should make sure that you put one per seed tray. Greg prefers to seed by hand because it is a lot easier with those pelleted seeds. Greg shows his little mini greenhouse that he has a rooted fig cutting in that they had previously demonstrated on a video. It has some buddings and he will soon move it out to the greenhouse. They guys also discuss a little bit about the new seed room and the new products that will becoming to the Hoss Tools website very soon.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, they answer questions about starting spring crops in seed trays and the frequency at which soil samples should be taken in the garden. They explain that they usually start spring transplants around early to mid-February. Some spring transplants would include tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, okra, and watermelons. Travis does not recommend transplanting squash in the seed trays because they may experience some transplant shock. Greg explains soil sampling and suggests that the potassium, or "potash", levels shouldn't change much between winter and spring. He explains that potash is a little bit mobile in the soil so when doing an application of potash you should do it pre-plant a couple of three weeks before planting. Greg recommends not sampling the soil again as those nutrients should still be there for spring planting. Always remember when doing a soil sample and reading your phosphorous, potassium, and nitrogen levels you should apply them two to three weeks before planting not three or four months in advance.<br /> Tool of the Week<br /> <br /> Bushlore Garden Knife<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NgB4iD_2tmk Greg and Travis clean 30:42 Row by Row Episode 35: How to Prepare a Garden Plot for Planting https://hosstools.com/prepare-a-garden-plot/ Wed, 30 Jan 2019 04:19:37 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=43864 Preparing Your Garden Plot for Planting On this week’s episode, the guys talk about the different ways to prepare a garden plot for planting. They first discuss how to determine the appropriate size of the garden. They explain how they prefer small subplots versus one large garden plot. The subplots make the garden easier to manage and are more friendly to proper crop rotation. They've found that planting in long rows is not the best solution for crop rotation because you are limited to where you can plant year after year. They talk about different ways to prepare the soil on a new garden plot. These would include using a bottom plow, harrow, tiller or tarping. They suggest starting a couple of months before you intend to plant, as this will allow enough time to break up the grass clumps and get the tilth to a working state. Also, Greg says when you go to prepare a garden plot do not forget to do a soil sample test so you know what level of phosphorus, potassium, and nitrogen you need to add to the soil before planting. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Travis has a jar of pickled okra that his father-in-law made. The guys try it on the show and talk about their favorite ways to make pickled okra. Travis brought a head of white cauliflower that he harvested from the demonstration garden at the Sunbelt Ag Expo. Although it can take a while to produce, cauliflower is one of the best-tasting treats from the cool-weather vegetable garden. He also has a head of purple cauliflower called Graffiti. With the purple cauliflower, you don't have to worry about much discoloration because of the darker color. This is a great variety that is rich in antioxidants and holds its color when cooked. We also carry a yellow to orangish, Flame Star Cauliflower that is a hybrid and has great heat tolerance. Greg talks a little bit about when you want to use calcium nitrate and ammonium sulfate. In the southern climates, you should use some ammonium sulfate on onions because it is a nitrogen source that contains a lot of sulfur which onions love. In the northern climates, you should use calcium nitrate to help supplement your nitrogen source to onions. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about planting the Premium Greens Mix and how to manage squash borers. Travis explains that the Asian greens mixes are pretty cold-hardy and can be planted anytime throughout the fall and winter growing seasons. Succession planting these beds of greens is a great strategy to ensure continuous harvests throughout the cooler months. Greg says if we have a really bad cold spell they will take a little longer to germinate and pop up, but if you have warmer days it won't take long at all to pop up. They mention that squash vine borers are more easily controlled in the larval stage, but can be difficult to manage once adult populations begin to thrive. They suggest using rotations of B.t. and Spinosad to eliminate larval individuals and prevent adult populations from flourishing and doing maximal damage. Greg says instead of using B.t. he would use Neem Oil and switch it out with Spinosad. As well as, good crop rotation because it is not good to plant the same crops in the same spot year after year. Also, removing crop debris like eggs that can overwinter in the soil will decrease your chances of squash borers in the vegetable garden. Tool of the Week Graffiti Cauliflower https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QCpja4pSvEo Preparing Your Garden Plot for Planting On this week’s episode, the guys talk about the different ways to prepare a garden plot for planting. They first discuss how to determine the appropriate size of the garden. Preparing Your Garden Plot for Planting<br /> On this week’s episode, the guys talk about the different ways to prepare a garden plot for planting. They first discuss how to determine the appropriate size of the garden. They explain how they prefer small subplots versus one large garden plot. The subplots make the garden easier to manage and are more friendly to proper crop rotation. They've found that planting in long rows is not the best solution for crop rotation because you are limited to where you can plant year after year. They talk about different ways to prepare the soil on a new garden plot. These would include using a bottom plow, harrow, tiller or tarping. They suggest starting a couple of months before you intend to plant, as this will allow enough time to break up the grass clumps and get the tilth to a working state. Also, Greg says when you go to prepare a garden plot do not forget to do a soil sample test so you know what level of phosphorus, potassium, and nitrogen you need to add to the soil before planting.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Travis has a jar of pickled okra that his father-in-law made. The guys try it on the show and talk about their favorite ways to make pickled okra. Travis brought a head of white cauliflower that he harvested from the demonstration garden at the Sunbelt Ag Expo. Although it can take a while to produce, cauliflower is one of the best-tasting treats from the cool-weather vegetable garden. He also has a head of purple cauliflower called Graffiti. With the purple cauliflower, you don't have to worry about much discoloration because of the darker color. This is a great variety that is rich in antioxidants and holds its color when cooked. We also carry a yellow to orangish, Flame Star Cauliflower that is a hybrid and has great heat tolerance. Greg talks a little bit about when you want to use calcium nitrate and ammonium sulfate. In the southern climates, you should use some ammonium sulfate on onions because it is a nitrogen source that contains a lot of sulfur which onions love. In the northern climates, you should use calcium nitrate to help supplement your nitrogen source to onions.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about planting the Premium Greens Mix and how to manage squash borers. Travis explains that the Asian greens mixes are pretty cold-hardy and can be planted anytime throughout the fall and winter growing seasons. Succession planting these beds of greens is a great strategy to ensure continuous harvests throughout the cooler months. Greg says if we have a really bad cold spell they will take a little longer to germinate and pop up, but if you have warmer days it won't take long at all to pop up. They mention that squash vine borers are more easily controlled in the larval stage, but can be difficult to manage once adult populations begin to thrive. They suggest using rotations of B.t. and Spinosad to eliminate larval individuals and prevent adult populations from flourishing and doing maximal damage. Greg says instead of using B.t. he would use Neem Oil and switch it out with Spinosad. As well as, good crop rotation because it is not good to plant the same crops in the same spot year after year. Also, removing crop debris like eggs that can overwinter in the soil will decrease your chances of squash borers in the vegetable garden.<br /> Tool of the Week<br /> <br /> Graffiti Cauliflower<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QCpja4pSvEo Greg and Travis clean 25:35 Row by Row Episode 34: New Years Resolutions for Vegetable Gardeners https://hosstools.com/new-years-resolutions/ Wed, 30 Jan 2019 03:46:53 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=43863 Vegetable Gardeners: New Years Resolutions On this week’s episode, the guys discuss their New Years Resolutions for their own personal gardens. Some of their New Years Resolutions include expanding their garden size, growing more cover crops, growing more winter squash in spring, doing more pickling and fermenting, and growing more okra. Travis mentions that he has plans to expand his garden area by 1/4 acre after the removal of trees and finishes the preparation of the soil so he can get started planting spring crops. This will add at least six more subplots to his current garden production. Another resolution is that he would like to incorporate more summer cover crops into the rotation, especially in the months of August and September when many things won't grow due to the extreme heat. He also mentions that he wants to grow more crops that can be harvested more than one time. So crops like Asian greens, Lacinato kale, tiger collards, and okra would all be great because you are able to get multiple harvests off that one crop. Greg explains that one of his New Years Resolutions is to increase his soil health by nurturing the earthworm and microbial populations in it. Another resolution he has is to do a better job in succession planting this coming year. The last resolution that Greg mentions is he wants to go back to growing his favorite field corn variety, Hickory King. It is an old heirloom variety that produces around 12 to 13-foot tall stalks and each stalk produces two huge ears of corn. Overall, Greg and Travis looking forward to trying out these New Years Resolutions and hope to have more successful gardens in the new year. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Travis has some Purple Vienna Kohlrabi and Premium Greens Mix that he grew in his garden. The Purple Vienna Kohlrabi is a great fall/winter vegetable that is cold-hardy, fast-growing and great to eat. The leaves are edible, but most people grow them for the bulb which sits at the bottom of the plant. The bulb has a flavor that resembles a cross between cabbage and cucumber. The Premium Greens Mix is a combination of several different greens like Tatsoi, Mizuna, Arugula, Red Mustard, and Red Russian Kale. This is a great fast-growing, productive crop that grows in the cooler months. It is a "cut and come again" crop that may be harvested 3-4 times throughout the cool growing season. It's great when prepared raw for a salad, but also can be sautéed with other cool weather vegetables. The tool of the week is the Farmers file that has a double-side for taking the excess material off and single-side for finishing up getting that edge as you want it. Greg talks about the new hand-held Oscillating hoe that they have been working on that has been redesigned to fix on a handle. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about NOP compliant pelleted seed and how to plant mustard as a cover crop. The NOP is the organic compliant pelleted seed which you see a lot with carrots or lettuce. They explain that pelleted seed will definitely be something they carry in the future, but the varieties may be limited initially. They contrast growing a large cover crop of mustard versus a small one and explain that broadcasting is more feasible on a larger plot while a walk-behind seeder works well for smaller plots. Greg says if he is using mustard for a cover crop he will broadcast it, but if he is using it for a food crop he will use the seeder and plant in rows. Tool of the Week Farmer's File https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l034fuHKSzw Vegetable Gardeners: New Years Resolutions On this week’s episode, the guys discuss their New Years Resolutions for their own personal gardens. Some of their New Years Resolutions include expanding their garden size, growing more cover crops, Vegetable Gardeners: New Years Resolutions<br /> On this week’s episode, the guys discuss their New Years Resolutions for their own personal gardens. Some of their New Years Resolutions include expanding their garden size, growing more cover crops, growing more winter squash in spring, doing more pickling and fermenting, and growing more okra. Travis mentions that he has plans to expand his garden area by 1/4 acre after the removal of trees and finishes the preparation of the soil so he can get started planting spring crops. This will add at least six more subplots to his current garden production. Another resolution is that he would like to incorporate more summer cover crops into the rotation, especially in the months of August and September when many things won't grow due to the extreme heat. He also mentions that he wants to grow more crops that can be harvested more than one time. So crops like Asian greens, Lacinato kale, tiger collards, and okra would all be great because you are able to get multiple harvests off that one crop. Greg explains that one of his New Years Resolutions is to increase his soil health by nurturing the earthworm and microbial populations in it. Another resolution he has is to do a better job in succession planting this coming year. The last resolution that Greg mentions is he wants to go back to growing his favorite field corn variety, Hickory King. It is an old heirloom variety that produces around 12 to 13-foot tall stalks and each stalk produces two huge ears of corn. Overall, Greg and Travis looking forward to trying out these New Years Resolutions and hope to have more successful gardens in the new year.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Travis has some Purple Vienna Kohlrabi and Premium Greens Mix that he grew in his garden. The Purple Vienna Kohlrabi is a great fall/winter vegetable that is cold-hardy, fast-growing and great to eat. The leaves are edible, but most people grow them for the bulb which sits at the bottom of the plant. The bulb has a flavor that resembles a cross between cabbage and cucumber. The Premium Greens Mix is a combination of several different greens like Tatsoi, Mizuna, Arugula, Red Mustard, and Red Russian Kale. This is a great fast-growing, productive crop that grows in the cooler months. It is a "cut and come again" crop that may be harvested 3-4 times throughout the cool growing season. It's great when prepared raw for a salad, but also can be sautéed with other cool weather vegetables. The tool of the week is the Farmers file that has a double-side for taking the excess material off and single-side for finishing up getting that edge as you want it. Greg talks about the new hand-held Oscillating hoe that they have been working on that has been redesigned to fix on a handle.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about NOP compliant pelleted seed and how to plant mustard as a cover crop. The NOP is the organic compliant pelleted seed which you see a lot with carrots or lettuce. They explain that pelleted seed will definitely be something they carry in the future, but the varieties may be limited initially. They contrast growing a large cover crop of mustard versus a small one and explain that broadcasting is more feasible on a larger plot while a walk-behind seeder works well for smaller plots. Greg says if he is using mustard for a cover crop he will broadcast it, but if he is using it for a food crop he will use the seeder and plant in rows.<br /> Tool of the Week<br /> <br /> Farmer's File<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l034fuHKSzw Greg and Travis clean 25:47 Row by Row Episode 33: Using Biofumigation to Manage Garden Pests https://hosstools.com/biofumigation/ Wed, 30 Jan 2019 03:27:21 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=43862 Biofumigation in the Vegetable Garden On this week’s episode, the guys discuss using biofumigation as a sustainable technique for controlling harmful soil pests like nematodes. Travis begins by describing how biofumigation works so different plants like brassicas will release certain compounds when their leaves are broken down into the soil. Brassicas and mustards both have those different compounds known as glucosinolates. Broadleaf mustard is a great cover crop to use for biofumigation. Travis talks about a plot that he has grown throughout the fall in an attempt to remove nematodes that he found on an okra crop. When certain crops (like mustard) are chopped and incorporated into the soil, they release chemical compounds that fumigate the soil and kill harmful soil pests. Biofumigation is great for nematode control, weed pressure, and fungal diseases. Also, it helps with Verticillium and Fusarium Wilt. They talk about best practices for incorporating the biofumigant crop into the soil, including what equipment to use and when to do it. Travis says they recommended having your soil pH as close to neutral or 7 as possible. Another recommendation is adding nitrogen or the nutrients before you plant. They mention that the plant leaves must be adequately chopped for the biofumigant chemicals to be released. This is best done with a tiller or a harrow. The chopping and incorporation of the biomass are also best done when the soil is somewhat moist. Due to the release of the biofumigant gases, it is important to not plant anything in that area until the cover crop is completely decomposed. This will ensure any of the biofumigant effects do not affect the following crop. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, the guys talk about the large amounts of rain they've been having and how it has impeded their ability to cultivate the garden. They mention that they have been unable to inject fertilizer through the drip system, but have been side dressing using Chilean Nitrate. Greg used the fertilizer on his onions, radishes, mustard, and beets in the vegetable garden. Travis talks about his onions and how he's been fertilizing them regularly lately. They guys also answer some questions that viewers have been having about when you can suspect to see our new seed lineup on the website. They also talk a little bit about the start of construction on our new climate controlled seed room. The guys share their tool of the week which is Broadleaf mustard. It is not only great to eat, but it also offers disease and weed control in your garden. We offer the mustard in a one, five, and ten-pound bags. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer a wish from a viewer. Travis reads a letter from a 16-year-old boy who raises chickens for egg production to sell at the farmers market. The boy grows his own corn for feed and was having trouble with weeds hampering his corn production. The guys were glad to grant his Christmas wish and send him a new High Arch Wheel Hoe and some attachments to help him grow more corn for the future. Tool of the Week Broadleaf Mustard https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8r7OBAGI8a4 Biofumigation in the Vegetable Garden On this week’s episode, the guys discuss using biofumigation as a sustainable technique for controlling harmful soil pests like nematodes. Travis begins by describing how biofumigation works so different plants li... Biofumigation in the Vegetable Garden<br /> On this week’s episode, the guys discuss using biofumigation as a sustainable technique for controlling harmful soil pests like nematodes. Travis begins by describing how biofumigation works so different plants like brassicas will release certain compounds when their leaves are broken down into the soil. Brassicas and mustards both have those different compounds known as glucosinolates. Broadleaf mustard is a great cover crop to use for biofumigation. Travis talks about a plot that he has grown throughout the fall in an attempt to remove nematodes that he found on an okra crop. When certain crops (like mustard) are chopped and incorporated into the soil, they release chemical compounds that fumigate the soil and kill harmful soil pests. Biofumigation is great for nematode control, weed pressure, and fungal diseases. Also, it helps with Verticillium and Fusarium Wilt.<br /> <br /> They talk about best practices for incorporating the biofumigant crop into the soil, including what equipment to use and when to do it. Travis says they recommended having your soil pH as close to neutral or 7 as possible. Another recommendation is adding nitrogen or the nutrients before you plant. They mention that the plant leaves must be adequately chopped for the biofumigant chemicals to be released. This is best done with a tiller or a harrow. The chopping and incorporation of the biomass are also best done when the soil is somewhat moist. Due to the release of the biofumigant gases, it is important to not plant anything in that area until the cover crop is completely decomposed. This will ensure any of the biofumigant effects do not affect the following crop.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, the guys talk about the large amounts of rain they've been having and how it has impeded their ability to cultivate the garden. They mention that they have been unable to inject fertilizer through the drip system, but have been side dressing using Chilean Nitrate. Greg used the fertilizer on his onions, radishes, mustard, and beets in the vegetable garden. Travis talks about his onions and how he's been fertilizing them regularly lately. They guys also answer some questions that viewers have been having about when you can suspect to see our new seed lineup on the website. They also talk a little bit about the start of construction on our new climate controlled seed room. The guys share their tool of the week which is Broadleaf mustard. It is not only great to eat, but it also offers disease and weed control in your garden. We offer the mustard in a one, five, and ten-pound bags.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer a wish from a viewer. Travis reads a letter from a 16-year-old boy who raises chickens for egg production to sell at the farmers market. The boy grows his own corn for feed and was having trouble with weeds hampering his corn production. The guys were glad to grant his Christmas wish and send him a new High Arch Wheel Hoe and some attachments to help him grow more corn for the future.<br /> Tool of the Week<br /> <br /> Broadleaf Mustard<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8r7OBAGI8a4 Greg and Travis clean 34:29 Row by Row Episode 32: The Best Gardening Gifts Under $20 https://hosstools.com/gardening-gifts/ Thu, 13 Dec 2018 20:10:00 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=42956 Best Gardening Gifts for Under $20 On this week’s episode, the guys talk about the best gardening gifts under $20 for the holiday season. The first one they show is the Carrot and Potato Washing Brush, which is an excellent vegetable brush for harder-skinned gardening harvests. This brush is made in the USA and very high-quality. The second stocking stuffer is the Hoss Garden Planner, which provides planting dates, plant spacing, row spacing and even companion planting suggestions for a wide variety of vegetable crops. The next gardening gifts include Wooden Garden Labels which is great for putting in your transplanted seed trays or even in the garden so you can know what you planted. The fourth gardening gift is the Farmers File, which is great for keeping hoes and other hand tools sharp. Greg then shows the Corn Silking Brush, which is hard to find but very useful for removing the silks on fresh sweet corn. Travis shows one of his favorite tools for pickling vegetables, which is the Pickle Packer vegetable tamper. The last gardening gifts under $20 include Cotton Butcher String, the California Knife and the Handy Twine Knife, which are all especially handy to have around the farm and garden. They also discuss some of their favorite gardening gifts that are not available on the Hoss Tools site. These would include Muck Boots, Foxgloves, a Buck pocket knife, Row Cover and a Filson wax canvas hat. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Greg has a head of broccoli that came from Travis' garden. Travis mentions that this is the Green Magic variety, which is especially heat-tolerant compared to other standard broccoli varieties. He mentions that they will soon carry two varieties of broccoli, Green Magic and Arcadia. While Green Magic is especially heat-tolerant, Acadia performs well in cool weather when soil moisture tends to be higher. Greg's garden is drying out from all the rain lately. He has lettuce and mixed greens planted and will need to hit them both with some fertilizer soon. Travis side dressed with some Chilean Nitrate last night since there is rain coming. This weeks tool of the week is the Bushlore Garden Knife which has a high carbon steel blade and a full tang. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer a question about a 40-year-old fig tree ceasing production. Greg mentions that disease can sometimes cripple old trees, but that he would still have hope for it. He recommends pruning all the old, dead wood and cutting at an angle so the wood does not hold in there. One thing that Greg has noticed about fig trees is they respond well to good water. Make sure you provide enough water to that tree when you experience a dry period. He says give it about a year to grow back and it should stay true to variety. If it does not come back and flourish it may have got to infected so remove the tree and replace it. Greg gives one tip that he likes to do with his fig trees. He takes a 5-gallon bucket then drills a small hole at the bottom of the bucket and fills it with water. Greg places that bucket next to his fig tree during the dry period and the fig tree is gradually getting water from the 5-gallon bucket. Greg shows off one more gardening gift idea at the end of the show. Which is the Garden Hod that works as a great multifunctional harvesting bucket. Tool of the Week Bushlore Garden Knife https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z15scCF8vFc&t=24s Best Gardening Gifts for Under $20 On this week’s episode, the guys talk about the best gardening gifts under $20 for the holiday season. The first one they show is the Carrot and Potato Washing Brush, which is an excellent vegetable brush for harder-... Best Gardening Gifts for Under $20<br /> On this week’s episode, the guys talk about the best gardening gifts under $20 for the holiday season. The first one they show is the Carrot and Potato Washing Brush, which is an excellent vegetable brush for harder-skinned gardening harvests. This brush is made in the USA and very high-quality. The second stocking stuffer is the Hoss Garden Planner, which provides planting dates, plant spacing, row spacing and even companion planting suggestions for a wide variety of vegetable crops. The next gardening gifts include Wooden Garden Labels which is great for putting in your transplanted seed trays or even in the garden so you can know what you planted. The fourth gardening gift is the Farmers File, which is great for keeping hoes and other hand tools sharp. Greg then shows the Corn Silking Brush, which is hard to find but very useful for removing the silks on fresh sweet corn. Travis shows one of his favorite tools for pickling vegetables, which is the Pickle Packer vegetable tamper. The last gardening gifts under $20 include Cotton Butcher String, the California Knife and the Handy Twine Knife, which are all especially handy to have around the farm and garden. They also discuss some of their favorite gardening gifts that are not available on the Hoss Tools site. These would include Muck Boots, Foxgloves, a Buck pocket knife, Row Cover and a Filson wax canvas hat.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Greg has a head of broccoli that came from Travis' garden. Travis mentions that this is the Green Magic variety, which is especially heat-tolerant compared to other standard broccoli varieties. He mentions that they will soon carry two varieties of broccoli, Green Magic and Arcadia. While Green Magic is especially heat-tolerant, Acadia performs well in cool weather when soil moisture tends to be higher. Greg's garden is drying out from all the rain lately. He has lettuce and mixed greens planted and will need to hit them both with some fertilizer soon. Travis side dressed with some Chilean Nitrate last night since there is rain coming. This weeks tool of the week is the Bushlore Garden Knife which has a high carbon steel blade and a full tang.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer a question about a 40-year-old fig tree ceasing production. Greg mentions that disease can sometimes cripple old trees, but that he would still have hope for it. He recommends pruning all the old, dead wood and cutting at an angle so the wood does not hold in there. One thing that Greg has noticed about fig trees is they respond well to good water. Make sure you provide enough water to that tree when you experience a dry period. He says give it about a year to grow back and it should stay true to variety. If it does not come back and flourish it may have got to infected so remove the tree and replace it. Greg gives one tip that he likes to do with his fig trees. He takes a 5-gallon bucket then drills a small hole at the bottom of the bucket and fills it with water. Greg places that bucket next to his fig tree during the dry period and the fig tree is gradually getting water from the 5-gallon bucket. Greg shows off one more gardening gift idea at the end of the show. Which is the Garden Hod that works as a great multifunctional harvesting bucket.<br /> Tool of the Week<br /> <br /> Bushlore Garden Knife<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z15scCF8vFc&t=24s Greg and Travis clean 30:37 Row by Row Episode 31: How to Propagate Unique Fig Varieties https://hosstools.com/fig-varieties/ Thu, 13 Dec 2018 17:31:58 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=42952 Propagating Fig Varieties On this week’s episode, the guys talk about fig varieties and how to propagate new trees from existing ones. They talk about the different flavor profiles that can be present in a given fig variety. These can include berry, honey or sugar. Berry figs have more of a strawberry or fruity taste and tend to have a purple or red pulp. Honey figs have a caramel or molasses flavor and tend to have a golden pulp with yellow skin. Sugar figs have a basic, sweet sugary taste with a slight tannin flavor and will have a brown or amber pulp and dark skin. All fig varieties can be a combination of any of these categories, so the flavor scale is more of a continuum than a specific classification. Greg talks about open-eye versus close-eye figs and mentions how the close-eye trait is an adaptation that protects the figs from insects and makes the fruit more palatable. Travis mentions that figs are parthenocarpic, meaning they don't require fertilization to produce fruit. The fig, in fact, is simply a collection of unfertilized female reproductive organs. Greg explains that many people buy fig cuttings and rot them by themselves which sounds a little intimidating at first. However, Greg gives a little demonstration on how to take the fig cuttings and rot them for the garden. They also discuss the research that has been done at Louisiana State University (LSU) where many improved fig varieties have been developed over the years and released to the public. Greg recommends starting out with those fig varieties. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Greg has a satsuma orange that he got from a neighbor's tree. He explains that these types of citrus can be grown well in the deep south as long as the winters are not too cold. Travis brought a beet to taste test on the show. The beet is the Merlin variety, which has a very high sugar content compared to other red beet varieties. He also has a Purple Vienna Kohlrabi variety that is cold-tolerant and it has a similar taste to turnips. Kohlrabi is a great vegetable that's easy to grow and has excellent taste raw or cooked. We offer a Purple Vienna and a White Vienna Kohlrabi variety. They guys talk a little bit about adding fertilizer to there Mustard cover crops in the garden. The tool of the week is the diamond hoe. This is a great go-to tool that slides along the top of the soil surface to remove those small weeds in the garden. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about drip irrigation and what type of hat Greg is wearing on the show. They explain the crops for which they prefer drip irrigation and those that they prefer to use overhead irrigation. Travis uses more drip irrigation than Greg, so it tends to be a matter of personal preference with some crops. Greg says it depends on the short-term or long-term crops and whether the crops warrant the drip tape or not. Short-term crops like summer squash Greg does not add drip tape on because he feels that they don't necessarily need the drip tape. On the other hand, crops like tomatoes, peppers, watermelons, pumpkins, or corn he always puts drip tape on those long-term crops. Greg mentions that his hat is a Filson. It is a waxed canvas hat which can get hot in the warmer months but is the perfect hat for the winter months. Tool of the Week Diamond Hoe https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ugTxcB9DCWY Propagating Fig Varieties On this week’s episode, the guys talk about fig varieties and how to propagate new trees from existing ones. They talk about the different flavor profiles that can be present in a given fig variety. These can include berry, Propagating Fig Varieties<br /> On this week’s episode, the guys talk about fig varieties and how to propagate new trees from existing ones. They talk about the different flavor profiles that can be present in a given fig variety. These can include berry, honey or sugar. Berry figs have more of a strawberry or fruity taste and tend to have a purple or red pulp. Honey figs have a caramel or molasses flavor and tend to have a golden pulp with yellow skin. Sugar figs have a basic, sweet sugary taste with a slight tannin flavor and will have a brown or amber pulp and dark skin. All fig varieties can be a combination of any of these categories, so the flavor scale is more of a continuum than a specific classification. Greg talks about open-eye versus close-eye figs and mentions how the close-eye trait is an adaptation that protects the figs from insects and makes the fruit more palatable. Travis mentions that figs are parthenocarpic, meaning they don't require fertilization to produce fruit. The fig, in fact, is simply a collection of unfertilized female reproductive organs. Greg explains that many people buy fig cuttings and rot them by themselves which sounds a little intimidating at first. However, Greg gives a little demonstration on how to take the fig cuttings and rot them for the garden. They also discuss the research that has been done at Louisiana State University (LSU) where many improved fig varieties have been developed over the years and released to the public. Greg recommends starting out with those fig varieties.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Greg has a satsuma orange that he got from a neighbor's tree. He explains that these types of citrus can be grown well in the deep south as long as the winters are not too cold. Travis brought a beet to taste test on the show. The beet is the Merlin variety, which has a very high sugar content compared to other red beet varieties. He also has a Purple Vienna Kohlrabi variety that is cold-tolerant and it has a similar taste to turnips. Kohlrabi is a great vegetable that's easy to grow and has excellent taste raw or cooked. We offer a Purple Vienna and a White Vienna Kohlrabi variety. They guys talk a little bit about adding fertilizer to there Mustard cover crops in the garden. The tool of the week is the diamond hoe. This is a great go-to tool that slides along the top of the soil surface to remove those small weeds in the garden.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about drip irrigation and what type of hat Greg is wearing on the show. They explain the crops for which they prefer drip irrigation and those that they prefer to use overhead irrigation. Travis uses more drip irrigation than Greg, so it tends to be a matter of personal preference with some crops. Greg says it depends on the short-term or long-term crops and whether the crops warrant the drip tape or not. Short-term crops like summer squash Greg does not add drip tape on because he feels that they don't necessarily need the drip tape. On the other hand, crops like tomatoes, peppers, watermelons, pumpkins, or corn he always puts drip tape on those long-term crops. Greg mentions that his hat is a Filson. It is a waxed canvas hat which can get hot in the warmer months but is the perfect hat for the winter months.<br /> Tool of the Week<br /> <br /> Diamond Hoe<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ugTxcB9DCWY Greg and Travis clean 27:48 Row by Row Episode 30: Growing Garlic and Elephant Garlic in Southern Climates https://hosstools.com/elephant-garlic/ Thu, 29 Nov 2018 20:30:08 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=42747 Growing Garlic and Elephant Garlic in the South On this week’s episode, the guys talk about growing garlic and elephant garlic in their southern climate. Which can be somewhat tricking growing in the garden with the temperatures we have in the deep south. They begin by distinguishing between hardneck and softneck garlic. Travis mentions that softneck grows well in areas with milder winters, whereas hardneck garlic prefers areas where winters can get pretty cold. Greg explains that softneck garlic is what is traditionally found at the grocery store. He then shares his experience with growing softneck garlic in his garden. Garlic needs cold temperatures or vernalization, which is the induction of flowering or bulbing. This vernalization period is necessary for the garlic bulb to stratify, or produce cloves. Greg mentions that it rarely gets cold enough in South Georgia for that stratification to take place. Some people claim that putting the cloves in the refrigerator before you plant can help with growth in the southern climates. On the other hand, the guys explain that they have had success growing elephant garlic. Elephant garlic, although related, is not a true garlic. Elephant garlic is closely related to leeks than garlic. They plant elephant garlic around the same time they plant onions. They dig a furrow and plant the cloves with the pointed ends up, about 3-4" deep in well-drained soil. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment, Greg talks a little bit about his Covington potatoes that have done great in the garden this year. Next year he is thinking about doing a row of Covington and Georgia Jets from Steele Plant Company to see which one does better. Travis brings the bottom of an okra stalk from his garden. Due to the cool weather, he recently pulled his okra plants from the soil. He mentions that this is a good opportunity to check for root-knot nematodes. From the appearance of these roots, there doesn't appear to be any root-knot nematode damage, which is good. He also brought some transplants that are ready to go in the ground, which includes Parris Island Romaine lettuce, Brussels sprouts, and beets. The tool of the week is our high carbon steel pruning shears that are really easy to sharpen. These shears are great for pruning muscadine vines and fig trees. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about soil blocking and pruning Brussels sprouts. Greg mentions that soil blocking is a good technique for people who like to take a long time to do something simple. He explains that the arguments for soil blocks don't hold water against their heavy-duty seed starting trays. Travis has a little more experience with growing Brussel sprouts. He talks about topping Brussels sprouts to get a better harvest. He mentions that the stalks will start by making a ton of foliage on the center stalks and then you will start to see the axillary buds begin to form. Under that foliage on that center stalk, you will then start to see your Brussel sprouts form. If you do not go in there and cut the tops off the plant's energy will be more focused on making leaves. Also, the Brussel sprouts will be unevenly sized along the stalks of the plant. Travis recommends getting a pair of pruners and cutting off the top apical meristem. That will allow the plant to put more energy and focus into growing more buds or Brussel sprouts. This will also increase more evenly production on the stalks in the garden. Tool of the Week Pruning Shears https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DVtiy5u-VSc Growing Garlic and Elephant Garlic in the South On this week’s episode, the guys talk about growing garlic and elephant garlic in their southern climate. Which can be somewhat tricking growing in the garden with the temperatures we have in the deep so... Growing Garlic and Elephant Garlic in the South<br /> On this week’s episode, the guys talk about growing garlic and elephant garlic in their southern climate. Which can be somewhat tricking growing in the garden with the temperatures we have in the deep south. They begin by distinguishing between hardneck and softneck garlic. Travis mentions that softneck grows well in areas with milder winters, whereas hardneck garlic prefers areas where winters can get pretty cold. Greg explains that softneck garlic is what is traditionally found at the grocery store. He then shares his experience with growing softneck garlic in his garden. Garlic needs cold temperatures or vernalization, which is the induction of flowering or bulbing. This vernalization period is necessary for the garlic bulb to stratify, or produce cloves. Greg mentions that it rarely gets cold enough in South Georgia for that stratification to take place. Some people claim that putting the cloves in the refrigerator before you plant can help with growth in the southern climates. On the other hand, the guys explain that they have had success growing elephant garlic. Elephant garlic, although related, is not a true garlic. Elephant garlic is closely related to leeks than garlic. They plant elephant garlic around the same time they plant onions. They dig a furrow and plant the cloves with the pointed ends up, about 3-4" deep in well-drained soil.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment, Greg talks a little bit about his Covington potatoes that have done great in the garden this year. Next year he is thinking about doing a row of Covington and Georgia Jets from Steele Plant Company to see which one does better. Travis brings the bottom of an okra stalk from his garden. Due to the cool weather, he recently pulled his okra plants from the soil. He mentions that this is a good opportunity to check for root-knot nematodes. From the appearance of these roots, there doesn't appear to be any root-knot nematode damage, which is good. He also brought some transplants that are ready to go in the ground, which includes Parris Island Romaine lettuce, Brussels sprouts, and beets. The tool of the week is our high carbon steel pruning shears that are really easy to sharpen. These shears are great for pruning muscadine vines and fig trees.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about soil blocking and pruning Brussels sprouts. Greg mentions that soil blocking is a good technique for people who like to take a long time to do something simple. He explains that the arguments for soil blocks don't hold water against their heavy-duty seed starting trays. Travis has a little more experience with growing Brussel sprouts. He talks about topping Brussels sprouts to get a better harvest. He mentions that the stalks will start by making a ton of foliage on the center stalks and then you will start to see the axillary buds begin to form. Under that foliage on that center stalk, you will then start to see your Brussel sprouts form. If you do not go in there and cut the tops off the plant's energy will be more focused on making leaves. Also, the Brussel sprouts will be unevenly sized along the stalks of the plant. Travis recommends getting a pair of pruners and cutting off the top apical meristem. That will allow the plant to put more energy and focus into growing more buds or Brussel sprouts. This will also increase more evenly production on the stalks in the garden.<br /> Tool of the Week<br /> <br /> Pruning Shears<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DVtiy5u-VSc Greg and Travis clean 24:55 Row by Row Episode 29: The Top 10 Best Christmas Gift Ideas for Gardeners https://hosstools.com/christmas-gift-gardeners/ Thu, 29 Nov 2018 20:08:05 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=42746 Top 10 Best Gift Ideas for Gardeners On this week’s episode, the guys take a break from the traditional gardening discussion and talk about the best Christmas gift ideas for gardeners. They have a top 10 list that they reveal. They start with some cutting tools including their Watermelon Knife, Hatchet and Village Machete. The watermelon knife is made by Ontario Knife Company in New York. This tool is great for cutting up any of your larger produce like watermelons, pumpkins, or cantaloupe. One of Greg's favorite tools is the high carbon steel hatchet. This is an ideal tool for light cutting of limbs or word around the garden or homestead. Greg talks about how a nice machete is a perfect gift for anyone because it is such a versatile tool with many different uses around the farm and garden. This machete has a beautiful walnut handle and has a high carbon steel blade with a full tang. Travis continues through the list with a couple of his favorite short-handle tools, which include the Short Single Tine Cultivator and their famous Garden Trowel. He mentions that the Single Tine Cultivator is absolutely his favorite tool for weeding onions, garlic, and similar crops in the garden. He talks about the strength of the Garden Trowel and how it is guaranteed with a lifetime warranty. Then they talk a little bit about their complete fermentation kit. This kit offers everything you would need to start fermenting your own vegetables. They then feature a couple of harvesting containers which include the TubTrug Colander and the extremely popular Over-the-Shoulder Harvesting Bucket. Travis speaks about the durability and indestructibility of the TubTrug Colander and how it won't become brittle over time. The popular Over-the-Shoulder Harvesting bucket offers comfortable padded support that will make harvesting ten times easier. Finally, the number one gift idea is their Single Wheel Hoe. Greg mentions that this is the ultimate gift for someone who is just getting into gardening. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment this week, the guys discuss the speculation of the Grand Solar Minimum that has been hypothesized by a UK scientist. Travis mentions that this is supposedly a more extreme, prolonged version of the solar minimum that happens every 11-12 years as a result of reduced solar flares. The guys discuss the possibility of if it is true that means there will be longer colder months. He mentions that many of the sites giving validity to the Grand Solar Minimum are in the "prepper" community. Greg mentions that he's not going to worry about anything he can't control. He also mentions that if anyone is going to be alright, he believes it will be them. The guys also talk a little bit about getting into the seed business. Starting in January, they will have a brand new seed lineup with many different varieties coming to the website. Top 10 Christmas Gift List 10. Watermelon Knife 9. Hatchet 8. Short Single Tine Cultivator 7. Village Machete 6. Garden Trowel 5. Complete Fermentation Kit 4. Old Hickory 8" Slicer 3. TubTrug Colander 2. Over-the-Shoulder Harvesting Bucket 1. Single Wheel Hoe https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d5MSO4RLmSc Top 10 Best Gift Ideas for Gardeners On this week’s episode, the guys take a break from the traditional gardening discussion and talk about the best Christmas gift ideas for gardeners. They have a top 10 list that they reveal. Top 10 Best Gift Ideas for Gardeners<br /> On this week’s episode, the guys take a break from the traditional gardening discussion and talk about the best Christmas gift ideas for gardeners. They have a top 10 list that they reveal. They start with some cutting tools including their Watermelon Knife, Hatchet and Village Machete. The watermelon knife is made by Ontario Knife Company in New York. This tool is great for cutting up any of your larger produce like watermelons, pumpkins, or cantaloupe. One of Greg's favorite tools is the high carbon steel hatchet. This is an ideal tool for light cutting of limbs or word around the garden or homestead. Greg talks about how a nice machete is a perfect gift for anyone because it is such a versatile tool with many different uses around the farm and garden. This machete has a beautiful walnut handle and has a high carbon steel blade with a full tang. Travis continues through the list with a couple of his favorite short-handle tools, which include the Short Single Tine Cultivator and their famous Garden Trowel. He mentions that the Single Tine Cultivator is absolutely his favorite tool for weeding onions, garlic, and similar crops in the garden. He talks about the strength of the Garden Trowel and how it is guaranteed with a lifetime warranty. Then they talk a little bit about their complete fermentation kit. This kit offers everything you would need to start fermenting your own vegetables. They then feature a couple of harvesting containers which include the TubTrug Colander and the extremely popular Over-the-Shoulder Harvesting Bucket. Travis speaks about the durability and indestructibility of the TubTrug Colander and how it won't become brittle over time. The popular Over-the-Shoulder Harvesting bucket offers comfortable padded support that will make harvesting ten times easier. Finally, the number one gift idea is their Single Wheel Hoe. Greg mentions that this is the ultimate gift for someone who is just getting into gardening.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment this week, the guys discuss the speculation of the Grand Solar Minimum that has been hypothesized by a UK scientist. Travis mentions that this is supposedly a more extreme, prolonged version of the solar minimum that happens every 11-12 years as a result of reduced solar flares. The guys discuss the possibility of if it is true that means there will be longer colder months. He mentions that many of the sites giving validity to the Grand Solar Minimum are in the "prepper" community. Greg mentions that he's not going to worry about anything he can't control. He also mentions that if anyone is going to be alright, he believes it will be them. The guys also talk a little bit about getting into the seed business. Starting in January, they will have a brand new seed lineup with many different varieties coming to the website.<br /> Top 10 Christmas Gift List<br /> 10. Watermelon Knife<br /> <br /> 9. Hatchet<br /> <br /> 8. Short Single Tine Cultivator<br /> <br /> 7. Village Machete<br /> <br /> 6. Garden Trowel<br /> <br /> 5. Complete Fermentation Kit<br /> <br /> 4. Old Hickory 8" Slicer<br /> <br /> 3. TubTrug Colander<br /> <br /> 2. Over-the-Shoulder Harvesting Bucket<br /> <br /> 1. Single Wheel Hoe<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d5MSO4RLmSc Greg and Travis clean 19:42 Row by Row Episode 28: The Most Cold Tolerant Crops in the Garden https://hosstools.com/cold-tolerant-crops/ Thu, 15 Nov 2018 20:51:10 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=42595 Coldest Tolerant Crops Grown in the Garden On this week’s episode, the guys talk about the coldest tolerant crops to grow in a vegetable garden. They begin by discussing factors that will increase cold tolerance. These include pre-conditioning and the amount of soil moisture present. If plants have been pre-conditioned to cooler temps, they will be more likely to survive than plants that experience a drastic drop in temperature. Due to water having a high specific heat, it insulates soils and keeps them from freezing. They always like to place the plants that are in the greenhouse to the outside of the greenhouse a few days before planting so they are able to adjust to the cooler outside temperatures. They talk about the cool weather champ crops that can withstand the harshest cold temperatures which include carrots, beets, Brussels sprouts, collards, kale, parsley, spinach, and leeks. Travis mentions that even with temperatures in the teens last year, he saw no damage to his carrots. They discuss the fact that collards are probably the coldest tolerant crop of them all, as some varieties have been noted to be cold tolerant down to zero degrees Fahrenheit. The crops that have moderate frost tolerance include broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, lettuce, mustard, onions, shallots, radishes, and turnips. These crops will not die from a light frost, but it may burn the tips of the leaves or foliage. They recommend if you ever have a chance of building a high tunnel greenhouse that is a great investment that will allow you to grow food year and not worry about the frost. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment this week, the guys talk about sweet corn in late fall and collards. Travis has an ear of Ambrosia corn harvested from the demonstration garden at the Hoss Sustainable Living Center. He mentions that most people only grow corn in the spring/summer, but that it can be grown throughout most of the year when no threat of frost is present. They also discuss collard varieties and reference a conversation between a seed representative about a trial between Tiger, Bulldog and Top Bunch collard varieties. Travis is really pleased with his Tiger Collards in the vegetable garden. Travis talks a little bit about the Top Bunch 2 variety that will be released soon. However, it may be a little pricy when it becomes available to buy. Greg has some cover crops starting to come up in the garden. As soon as the guys receive their onions from Steele Plant Company they will be planting onions in the garden. The tool of the week is the heat-treated steel, digging tool. Similar to the Hori Hori style gardening tool the digging tool is great for cultivating and weeding in smaller garden areas. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about trimming onions and planting shallots. Greg explains that he can't see any reason to trim the tops of onions for an upcoming frost. The tops are the location of photosynthesis which is critical to the plant. And even though they may burn a little in the frost, they will be just fine. Travis mentions that shallots can also be planted at the same time as onions. Shallots are apart of the onion family so this will allow the green onions to be harvested as a smaller version of the Yellow Granex or Texas Legend onions they grow. Tool of the Week Digging Tool https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2MJhdEfnM0w Coldest Tolerant Crops Grown in the Garden On this week’s episode, the guys talk about the coldest tolerant crops to grow in a vegetable garden. They begin by discussing factors that will increase cold tolerance. Coldest Tolerant Crops Grown in the Garden<br /> On this week’s episode, the guys talk about the coldest tolerant crops to grow in a vegetable garden. They begin by discussing factors that will increase cold tolerance. These include pre-conditioning and the amount of soil moisture present. If plants have been pre-conditioned to cooler temps, they will be more likely to survive than plants that experience a drastic drop in temperature. Due to water having a high specific heat, it insulates soils and keeps them from freezing. They always like to place the plants that are in the greenhouse to the outside of the greenhouse a few days before planting so they are able to adjust to the cooler outside temperatures. They talk about the cool weather champ crops that can withstand the harshest cold temperatures which include carrots, beets, Brussels sprouts, collards, kale, parsley, spinach, and leeks. Travis mentions that even with temperatures in the teens last year, he saw no damage to his carrots. They discuss the fact that collards are probably the coldest tolerant crop of them all, as some varieties have been noted to be cold tolerant down to zero degrees Fahrenheit. The crops that have moderate frost tolerance include broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, lettuce, mustard, onions, shallots, radishes, and turnips. These crops will not die from a light frost, but it may burn the tips of the leaves or foliage. They recommend if you ever have a chance of building a high tunnel greenhouse that is a great investment that will allow you to grow food year and not worry about the frost.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment this week, the guys talk about sweet corn in late fall and collards. Travis has an ear of Ambrosia corn harvested from the demonstration garden at the Hoss Sustainable Living Center. He mentions that most people only grow corn in the spring/summer, but that it can be grown throughout most of the year when no threat of frost is present. They also discuss collard varieties and reference a conversation between a seed representative about a trial between Tiger, Bulldog and Top Bunch collard varieties. Travis is really pleased with his Tiger Collards in the vegetable garden. Travis talks a little bit about the Top Bunch 2 variety that will be released soon. However, it may be a little pricy when it becomes available to buy. Greg has some cover crops starting to come up in the garden. As soon as the guys receive their onions from Steele Plant Company they will be planting onions in the garden. The tool of the week is the heat-treated steel, digging tool. Similar to the Hori Hori style gardening tool the digging tool is great for cultivating and weeding in smaller garden areas.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about trimming onions and planting shallots. Greg explains that he can't see any reason to trim the tops of onions for an upcoming frost. The tops are the location of photosynthesis which is critical to the plant. And even though they may burn a little in the frost, they will be just fine. Travis mentions that shallots can also be planted at the same time as onions. Shallots are apart of the onion family so this will allow the green onions to be harvested as a smaller version of the Yellow Granex or Texas Legend onions they grow.<br /> Tool of the Week<br /> <br /> Digging Tool<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2MJhdEfnM0w Greg and Travis clean 20:17 Row by Row Episode 27: Best Practices for Growing Onions https://hosstools.com/growing-onions/ Thu, 08 Nov 2018 20:29:22 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=42381 Growing Onions in the Vegetable Garden On this week’s episode, the guys talk about planting and growing onions. They talk about the difference between short-day, intermediate-day, and long-day onions and how you can determine which type is best for your area. The short-day onions are between 10 to 12 hours daylength. The intermediate-day is 12 to 14 hours daylength. Then, long-day are between 14 to 16 hours daylength. The ones that they can grow are short day onions because of where they live in the south. They also discuss the varieties that have worked well for them which include Texas Legend, Yellow Granex, Southern Belle Red and Red Creole. Greg and Travis discuss how they like to plant their onions thick and thin later when harvesting some as green onions. Travis mentions that growing onions can be broken into two phases -- the foliage stage and the bulb stage. He explains that you want to grow as much foliage as you can, which in turn will create nice, large bulbs during the latter stages of the plant growth. They also talk about fertilizer needs for onions. They mention that onions need a complete fertilizer with phosphorous and potassium initially, but then mostly nitrogen throughout the rest of the foliage stage. Travis will give the onions 20-20-20 to start off then lay off with that fertilizer and sometimes top dress or sprinkle some Chilean Nitrate. They recommend to stop adding fertilizer when the onions get to the bulbing stage. According to Bruce at Steele Plant Company, the sweetness of the onion is completely dependent on the amount of water it receives. When it comes to harvesting onions you should wait till the tops fall over. Steele Plant Company is also sending Greg and Travis some shallots, leeks, and elephant garlic to trial out in the garden this year. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment this week, the guys talk about some radishes that were just harvested from Travis' garden. Greg mentions that he recently planted several rows but is concerned about the heavy rains affecting the germination. Travis also explains the difference between multiform and monogram beet seed, and the need for thinning when using multiform beet seed. He prefers to grow beets from transplants because he can thin in the greenhouse versus thinning in the field. Greg has got carrots, English peas, cilantro, radishes, and beets all planted in the garden. The tool of the week is our dibble wheel attachment that can attach to our Single, Double, and High Arch Wheel Hoes. This is a great tool that makes indentions in the soil for transplants or seeding. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about adding phosphorous to the soil and will glyphosate kill weed seeds. The first step when wanting to add phosphorous is you should do a soil test to check where your levels are in the soil. Greg explains there are many different organic sources for adding phosphorous to garden soils, which include soft rock phosphate, hard rock phosphate, bone meal, and triple phosphate. He mentions that soft rock phosphate would be his preferred organic solution, but that the inorganic forms work very well also. Greg also states that if you have too much phosphorous in the soil you can use a crop like corn to pull away some of that phosphorous from the soil. Travis explains that glyphosate or commonly known as Roundup will not kill mature weed seeds and is only engineered to kill the plant. He says the best way to control weed seeds on your dirt is to incorporate them in or kill the plant before it seeds. Tool of the Week Dibble Wheel Attachment https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3yj7KE7BeP4&t=523s Growing Onions in the Vegetable Garden On this week’s episode, the guys talk about planting and growing onions. They talk about the difference between short-day, intermediate-day, and long-day onions and how you can determine which type is best for yo... Growing Onions in the Vegetable Garden<br /> On this week’s episode, the guys talk about planting and growing onions. They talk about the difference between short-day, intermediate-day, and long-day onions and how you can determine which type is best for your area. The short-day onions are between 10 to 12 hours daylength. The intermediate-day is 12 to 14 hours daylength. Then, long-day are between 14 to 16 hours daylength. The ones that they can grow are short day onions because of where they live in the south. They also discuss the varieties that have worked well for them which include Texas Legend, Yellow Granex, Southern Belle Red and Red Creole. Greg and Travis discuss how they like to plant their onions thick and thin later when harvesting some as green onions. Travis mentions that growing onions can be broken into two phases -- the foliage stage and the bulb stage. He explains that you want to grow as much foliage as you can, which in turn will create nice, large bulbs during the latter stages of the plant growth. They also talk about fertilizer needs for onions. They mention that onions need a complete fertilizer with phosphorous and potassium initially, but then mostly nitrogen throughout the rest of the foliage stage. Travis will give the onions 20-20-20 to start off then lay off with that fertilizer and sometimes top dress or sprinkle some Chilean Nitrate. They recommend to stop adding fertilizer when the onions get to the bulbing stage. According to Bruce at Steele Plant Company, the sweetness of the onion is completely dependent on the amount of water it receives. When it comes to harvesting onions you should wait till the tops fall over. Steele Plant Company is also sending Greg and Travis some shallots, leeks, and elephant garlic to trial out in the garden this year.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment this week, the guys talk about some radishes that were just harvested from Travis' garden. Greg mentions that he recently planted several rows but is concerned about the heavy rains affecting the germination. Travis also explains the difference between multiform and monogram beet seed, and the need for thinning when using multiform beet seed. He prefers to grow beets from transplants because he can thin in the greenhouse versus thinning in the field. Greg has got carrots, English peas, cilantro, radishes, and beets all planted in the garden. The tool of the week is our dibble wheel attachment that can attach to our Single, Double, and High Arch Wheel Hoes. This is a great tool that makes indentions in the soil for transplants or seeding.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about adding phosphorous to the soil and will glyphosate kill weed seeds. The first step when wanting to add phosphorous is you should do a soil test to check where your levels are in the soil. Greg explains there are many different organic sources for adding phosphorous to garden soils, which include soft rock phosphate, hard rock phosphate, bone meal, and triple phosphate. He mentions that soft rock phosphate would be his preferred organic solution, but that the inorganic forms work very well also. Greg also states that if you have too much phosphorous in the soil you can use a crop like corn to pull away some of that phosphorous from the soil. Travis explains that glyphosate or commonly known as Roundup will not kill mature weed seeds and is only engineered to kill the plant. He says the best way to control weed seeds on your dirt is to incorporate them in or kill the plant before it seeds.<br /> Tool of the Week<br /> <br /> Dibble Wheel Attachment<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3yj7KE7BeP4&t=523s Greg and Travis clean 25:12 Row by Row Episode 26: Mistakes to Avoid When Planting Carrots https://hosstools.com/planting-carrots/ Fri, 02 Nov 2018 20:00:22 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=42313 Avoid These Mistakes When Planting Carrots On this week’s episode, the guys talk about planting carrots. They start by discussing the four different types of carrots that are defined mostly by their shape. The Danvers type is the traditional "bugs bunny" carrot that has broad shoulders and tapers down to a pointy tip. The Nantes type, which is Travis' favorite, is more cylindrical with a blunt end. The Imperator type is slender and long and would be best suited for softer, well-drained soils. Finally, the Chantenay type is a short and stubby carrot that would be best suited for harder, clay soils. Travis mentions his favorite varieties to plant which include Miami, Bolero, Yellowstone and Purple Haze. Greg talks about some of the mistakes he has made in the past when planting carrots. These would include not planting them thick enough and not having enough patience for germination. Carrots can take up to 21 days to germinate so patience is very important when growing carrots. Greg has a little tip to help with stratification of carrots. He says you can put your carrot seeds in a Ziploc bag and place them in the refrigerator for a couple of weeks. Then, after a couple of weeks take them out the refrigerator and plant them immediately in the garden. This will in return help shorten the length and cause the germination to be quicker on the carrots. The optimal soil temperature is around 75 degrees, so the best time to harvest carrots is in February. A pest that you may experience when growing carrots is root-knot nematodes. It's important when doing crop rotation to avoid planting okra with carrots to reduce that nematode pressure. Another issue that you can experience is cavity spot or Pythium which is a soil disease in the garden. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment this week, Greg talks about the sweet potato crop that he recently dug. He has two really nice sweet potatoes that he brought to show the audience. He mentions that it is probably the best crop he has ever grown and that they will have sweet potatoes to eat for many months. Travis provides an update on getting onion plants from Dixondale Farms and mentions that it looks like it will be the end of November before they will ship onion plants. They discuss a little bit about there garden at the SunBelt Expo. They have ambrosia corn almost ready to harvest in the garden. As well as, their Broadleaf mustard cover crop that has just started coming up. The tool of the week this week is the single tine cultivator. One of our popular hand tools this is useful for scratching around onions, carrots, or elephant garlic that are planted closely together in the garden. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about no-till farming and ants in the garden. Travis mentions that true no-till farming can only be done with heavy commercial equipment because it's tough to penetrate uncultivated soil with hand seeders. And although many market farmers claim to be "no-till," they are actually minimum till. Greg and Travis prefer minimum till and only use the tiller when removing crop debris or leveling the soil. For ant control, Greg mentions that there are many toxic solutions on the market. But for use around the food garden, he prefers to use something like the Monterrey Ant Control which has non-toxic ingredients. It is a bait product so it will not kill the ants immediately and it may take a couple of days. Tool of the Week Single Tine Cultivator Short Single Tine Cultivator https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BHIJ7eMy-C8 Avoid These Mistakes When Planting Carrots On this week’s episode, the guys talk about planting carrots. They start by discussing the four different types of carrots that are defined mostly by their shape. Avoid These Mistakes When Planting Carrots<br /> On this week’s episode, the guys talk about planting carrots. They start by discussing the four different types of carrots that are defined mostly by their shape. The Danvers type is the traditional "bugs bunny" carrot that has broad shoulders and tapers down to a pointy tip. The Nantes type, which is Travis' favorite, is more cylindrical with a blunt end. The Imperator type is slender and long and would be best suited for softer, well-drained soils. Finally, the Chantenay type is a short and stubby carrot that would be best suited for harder, clay soils. Travis mentions his favorite varieties to plant which include Miami, Bolero, Yellowstone and Purple Haze. Greg talks about some of the mistakes he has made in the past when planting carrots. These would include not planting them thick enough and not having enough patience for germination. Carrots can take up to 21 days to germinate so patience is very important when growing carrots. Greg has a little tip to help with stratification of carrots. He says you can put your carrot seeds in a Ziploc bag and place them in the refrigerator for a couple of weeks. Then, after a couple of weeks take them out the refrigerator and plant them immediately in the garden. This will in return help shorten the length and cause the germination to be quicker on the carrots. The optimal soil temperature is around 75 degrees, so the best time to harvest carrots is in February. A pest that you may experience when growing carrots is root-knot nematodes. It's important when doing crop rotation to avoid planting okra with carrots to reduce that nematode pressure. Another issue that you can experience is cavity spot or Pythium which is a soil disease in the garden.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment this week, Greg talks about the sweet potato crop that he recently dug. He has two really nice sweet potatoes that he brought to show the audience. He mentions that it is probably the best crop he has ever grown and that they will have sweet potatoes to eat for many months. Travis provides an update on getting onion plants from Dixondale Farms and mentions that it looks like it will be the end of November before they will ship onion plants. They discuss a little bit about there garden at the SunBelt Expo. They have ambrosia corn almost ready to harvest in the garden. As well as, their Broadleaf mustard cover crop that has just started coming up. The tool of the week this week is the single tine cultivator. One of our popular hand tools this is useful for scratching around onions, carrots, or elephant garlic that are planted closely together in the garden.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about no-till farming and ants in the garden. Travis mentions that true no-till farming can only be done with heavy commercial equipment because it's tough to penetrate uncultivated soil with hand seeders. And although many market farmers claim to be "no-till," they are actually minimum till. Greg and Travis prefer minimum till and only use the tiller when removing crop debris or leveling the soil. For ant control, Greg mentions that there are many toxic solutions on the market. But for use around the food garden, he prefers to use something like the Monterrey Ant Control which has non-toxic ingredients. It is a bait product so it will not kill the ants immediately and it may take a couple of days.<br /> Tool of the Week<br /> <br /> Single Tine Cultivator<br /> Short Single Tine Cultivator<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BHIJ7eMy-C8 Greg and Travis clean 26:05 Row by Row Episode 25: Growing a Healthy Garden with the Correct Soil pH https://hosstools.com/correct-soil-ph/ Fri, 02 Nov 2018 19:45:15 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=42312 Correct Soil pH in the Garden On this week’s episode, the guys talk about soil chemistry and the importance of having the correct soil pH. They define pH as the concentration of free hydrogen ions and explain how the pH scale works. Most vegetable annuals prefer a soil pH that is just slightly acidic, usually around 6.5.  They talk about factors that can lower soil pH, which include rainfall, the addition of fertilizer, and certain cover crops. Greg talks about the importance of performing periodic soil tests to keep an eye on the soil chemistry. While soil pH can be easily raised with the addition of lime, it is extremely impossible to lower pH if you get it too high. There are two different formulations -- pelletized and agricultural grade. The best option is to get the pelletized lime because you are able to apply it using a fertilizer spreader. That's why it's important to do your own soil test so that the correct amounts of any pH adjusting material are added. If you add elements to the soil that you do not need you will have repercussions that are not easily fixable. Finally, they discuss the importance of macronutrients like nitrogen, phosphorous, potassium, calcium and sulfur. If pH is incorrect, then the availability of these nutrients will be affected. Greg says when you have deficiencies in your plants most of the time the first thing you need to check for accuracy of pH in the soil. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment this week, Travis talks about his recent sweet potato harvest and brings an extremely large sweet potato to show the audience. He mentions several techniques he tried this year that seemed to work well on his sweet potatoes. They also talk about the Rattlesnake pole beans growing in Travis' garden. These have been a very prolific crop thus far and are very appealing to the eye because of their purple color. Greg is in the process of cleaning his garden up and getting ready to plant all his cover crops. Brassicas, broccoli, cauliflower, kale, and collards are all in full swing in the garden. The tool of the week is the Hoss Tools, garden fork. A great heavy-duty tool for breaking ground and digging potatoes. The guys also mentioned how great it was to see so many people stop by the Hoss Sustainable Living Center at the SunBelt Expo last week. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer a question about composting and whether it should be applied to the entire garden or just where the plants are going to be. Travis mentions that compost can serve two purposes -- to improve the workability of the soil and also to provide nutrients. He also mentions that most composts are carbon-based, while they use mostly manure-based compost which has much more nitrogen. The carbon-based composts may be applied to the entire garden area as a way to amend or improve the soil structure, while the manure-based composts are typically only applied along the row due to the high nitrogen content. They guys say it's all about what you have available around your area. Tool of the Week Garden Fork https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C4wfcrW0gkA Correct Soil pH in the Garden On this week’s episode, the guys talk about soil chemistry and the importance of having the correct soil pH. They define pH as the concentration of free hydrogen ions and explain how the pH scale works. Correct Soil pH in the Garden<br /> On this week’s episode, the guys talk about soil chemistry and the importance of having the correct soil pH. They define pH as the concentration of free hydrogen ions and explain how the pH scale works. Most vegetable annuals prefer a soil pH that is just slightly acidic, usually around 6.5.  They talk about factors that can lower soil pH, which include rainfall, the addition of fertilizer, and certain cover crops. Greg talks about the importance of performing periodic soil tests to keep an eye on the soil chemistry. While soil pH can be easily raised with the addition of lime, it is extremely impossible to lower pH if you get it too high. There are two different formulations -- pelletized and agricultural grade. The best option is to get the pelletized lime because you are able to apply it using a fertilizer spreader. That's why it's important to do your own soil test so that the correct amounts of any pH adjusting material are added. If you add elements to the soil that you do not need you will have repercussions that are not easily fixable. Finally, they discuss the importance of macronutrients like nitrogen, phosphorous, potassium, calcium and sulfur. If pH is incorrect, then the availability of these nutrients will be affected. Greg says when you have deficiencies in your plants most of the time the first thing you need to check for accuracy of pH in the soil.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment this week, Travis talks about his recent sweet potato harvest and brings an extremely large sweet potato to show the audience. He mentions several techniques he tried this year that seemed to work well on his sweet potatoes. They also talk about the Rattlesnake pole beans growing in Travis' garden. These have been a very prolific crop thus far and are very appealing to the eye because of their purple color. Greg is in the process of cleaning his garden up and getting ready to plant all his cover crops. Brassicas, broccoli, cauliflower, kale, and collards are all in full swing in the garden. The tool of the week is the Hoss Tools, garden fork. A great heavy-duty tool for breaking ground and digging potatoes. The guys also mentioned how great it was to see so many people stop by the Hoss Sustainable Living Center at the SunBelt Expo last week.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer a question about composting and whether it should be applied to the entire garden or just where the plants are going to be. Travis mentions that compost can serve two purposes -- to improve the workability of the soil and also to provide nutrients. He also mentions that most composts are carbon-based, while they use mostly manure-based compost which has much more nitrogen. The carbon-based composts may be applied to the entire garden area as a way to amend or improve the soil structure, while the manure-based composts are typically only applied along the row due to the high nitrogen content. They guys say it's all about what you have available around your area.<br /> Tool of the Week<br /> <br /> Garden Fork<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C4wfcrW0gkA Greg and Travis clean 25:59 Row by Row Episode 22: Why “Back to Eden” Gardening Isn’t for Us https://hosstools.com/back-to-eden/ Thu, 04 Oct 2018 16:56:36 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=42045 The "Back To Eden" Gardening Technique On this week’s episode, the guys discuss the recently popular "Back to Eden" gardening technique. This technique involves mulching the entire garden area with straw or wood chips in an attempt to reduce weed pressure and conserve moisture. Travis mentions that while it does suppress some weeds, there will still be weed seed inputs from wind, water, and animals. And those weeds would require pulling by hand because of the inability to use a cultivating/weeding tool in a heavily mulched area. The guys agree that there preferred way of keeping weed pressure to a minimum is by planting cover crops. Also, adding cover crops will increase soil nutrients back into the soil. Overall, it does keep some weed pressure to a minimum, but frequent cultivation is much easier and effective. Another Back to Eden claim technique is that you will need less water and fertilizer in the garden. Travis says although it may reduce water usage it will not reduce fertilizer usage because of our location in the deep south. In the South, because of our soil types and weather, it is hard to keep nutrients in the soil for the plants to uptake. So we have to add fertilizer supplements to provide plants with the nutrients they need in the soil. Greg mentions that replicating a forest environment is not a good idea for vegetable plants. When growing a vegetable garden, we must manipulate the environment because these plants such as tomatoes, peppers or watermelons are not native. As a result, mulched areas create an unnatural environment for these cultivated varieties. Using wood chips will tie up your nitrogen nutrients in the garden which is a natural process that has to decay. Travis also mentions that the Back to Eden method is not a very time-efficient method of gardening. With short-term annual crops, it requires too much time to remove mulch when you plant versus simply cultivating the area once a week. Show and Tell Segment On the Show & Tell segment this week, the guys talk about their upcoming event at the Sunbelt Ag Expo. Greg says the garden is looking good with corn, collards, cut flowers and more. Greg also has some Seminole Pumpkins that he recently harvested from his personal garden. This pumpkin variety is very resistant to viruses and diseases that typically plague pumpkins grown in southern climates. Travis mentions that the Seminole variety has great flavor and is perfect for making pies or even baby food. The tool of the week is Chilean Nitrate which provides a natural source of nitrogen for the vegetable garden. Travis used it recently to side dress his broccoli, collards, and cauliflower. Greg used it also at the expo to side-dress corn and all the greens and it ended up making a huge difference in the plants. This is the best product to use if you need to add some nitrogen to a nitrogen-loving plant. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer a question about tillage radish spacing as a cover crop. Tillage radish works great in heavy clay soils because it grows deep in the soil and provides great nutrients. Travis explains that recommendations suggest a spacing of rows 6" to 14" apart, but that he would err on the side of having rows closer together. He suggests planting rows 6" apart if planting tillage radish with a walk-behind seeder. Greg talks about the benefits of tillage radish as a cover crop because it acts as a sponge for nutrients and breaks down easily when incorporated into the soil. Tool of the Week Chilean Nitrate Fertilizer https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZtAm8klFtgQ The "Back To Eden" Gardening Technique On this week’s episode, the guys discuss the recently popular "Back to Eden" gardening technique. This technique involves mulching the entire garden area with straw or wood chips in an attempt to reduce weed pres... The "Back To Eden" Gardening Technique<br /> On this week’s episode, the guys discuss the recently popular "Back to Eden" gardening technique. This technique involves mulching the entire garden area with straw or wood chips in an attempt to reduce weed pressure and conserve moisture. Travis mentions that while it does suppress some weeds, there will still be weed seed inputs from wind, water, and animals. And those weeds would require pulling by hand because of the inability to use a cultivating/weeding tool in a heavily mulched area. The guys agree that there preferred way of keeping weed pressure to a minimum is by planting cover crops. Also, adding cover crops will increase soil nutrients back into the soil. Overall, it does keep some weed pressure to a minimum, but frequent cultivation is much easier and effective. Another Back to Eden claim technique is that you will need less water and fertilizer in the garden. Travis says although it may reduce water usage it will not reduce fertilizer usage because of our location in the deep south. In the South, because of our soil types and weather, it is hard to keep nutrients in the soil for the plants to uptake. So we have to add fertilizer supplements to provide plants with the nutrients they need in the soil. Greg mentions that replicating a forest environment is not a good idea for vegetable plants. When growing a vegetable garden, we must manipulate the environment because these plants such as tomatoes, peppers or watermelons are not native. As a result, mulched areas create an unnatural environment for these cultivated varieties. Using wood chips will tie up your nitrogen nutrients in the garden which is a natural process that has to decay. Travis also mentions that the Back to Eden method is not a very time-efficient method of gardening. With short-term annual crops, it requires too much time to remove mulch when you plant versus simply cultivating the area once a week.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the Show & Tell segment this week, the guys talk about their upcoming event at the Sunbelt Ag Expo. Greg says the garden is looking good with corn, collards, cut flowers and more. Greg also has some Seminole Pumpkins that he recently harvested from his personal garden. This pumpkin variety is very resistant to viruses and diseases that typically plague pumpkins grown in southern climates. Travis mentions that the Seminole variety has great flavor and is perfect for making pies or even baby food. The tool of the week is Chilean Nitrate which provides a natural source of nitrogen for the vegetable garden. Travis used it recently to side dress his broccoli, collards, and cauliflower. Greg used it also at the expo to side-dress corn and all the greens and it ended up making a huge difference in the plants. This is the best product to use if you need to add some nitrogen to a nitrogen-loving plant.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer a question about tillage radish spacing as a cover crop. Tillage radish works great in heavy clay soils because it grows deep in the soil and provides great nutrients. Travis explains that recommendations suggest a spacing of rows 6" to 14" apart, but that he would err on the side of having rows closer together. He suggests planting rows 6" apart if planting tillage radish with a walk-behind seeder. Greg talks about the benefits of tillage radish as a cover crop because it acts as a sponge for nutrients and breaks down easily when incorporated into the soil.<br /> Tool of the Week<br /> <br /> Chilean Nitrate Fertilizer<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZtAm8klFtgQ Greg and Travis clean 25:21 Row by Row Episode 21: The Best Wheel Hoe Attachments for Your Garden https://hosstools.com/best-wheel-hoe-attachments/ Thu, 27 Sep 2018 17:29:38 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=41979 The Difference in Wheel Hoe Attachments On this week’s episode, the guys discuss the wide variety of attachments that are available for the Hoss Wheel Hoe. They go through each attachment and help to explain which are the best wheel hoe attachments for each particular garden or situation. They talk about the new Winged Sweep attachment that just became available and how it has more "bite" than the cultivator teeth. This additional bite or angle of cultivation will be helpful to those with harder, clay soils or those with heavy weed pressure. They also differentiate between the standard Sweeps and the Oscillating Hoe attachments. They mention that the Sweeps are for lighter jobs, while the Oscillating Hoes are some of the best wheel hoe attachments for heavier applications. We offer 3 different sizes of the oscillating hoes -- 6, 8, and 12 inches wide. The guys are also in the process of designing a handheld oscillating hoe that will be released soon. The Spreader Bar is a tool that extends the length for adding more attachments or offsetting your work path. They discuss the usefulness of the Disk Harrow attachment for light duty cultivation in softer soils. The last attachment they talk about is the Drip Tape Layer attachment that fits on the Double Wheel Hoe which makes it quick and easy to lay drip tape by yourself in the garden. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment this week, the guys talk about the variety of collards that they are growing this fall. Travis has Tiger Collard variety of transplants that are very similar to the Top Bunch variety that was so popular for many years. However, due to crop failure, the Top Bunch variety is no longer available. Travis also has Lacinato kale and Red Russian kale that are ready to move into the vegetable garden. They also provide an update on the demonstration garden at the Hoss Tools Sustainable Living Center for the Sunbelt Ag Expo and mention that they will be planting some mixed greens and cover crops there in the next few days. The pest pressure has decreased drastically in the last couple of weeks which is great for the vegetable garden. The tool of the week is Spinosad which is an organic control that helps with pest problems in the garden such as worms, thrips, and caterpillars. It has two different modes of action it can kill on contact or kill by ingestion within 48 hours of applying to the plant. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer a question about well water vs. tap water and using drip tape on onions. Greg mentions that tap water, or "city water", can affect the pH of your garden soil over time. He believes the chlorine concentrations are low enough to not have a significant effect, but that the pH should be monitored if one is using municipal water on their vegetable garden. Greg says it is important to know what level of pH is in your water because it has an effect on your soils. He recommends taking a sample of your water to a local pool store and asking them to run a pH test on it. They guys are currently waiting for their onion stalks to come from Dixondale, but as soon as they receive them they will be planting onions. Travis explains that his system for planting onions has been extremely effective year after year. He recommends planting onions on drip tape, with two rows of onions per one line of drip tape. Tool of the Week Spinosad Garden Insect Spray https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EHLD0eV3Vv8 The Difference in Wheel Hoe Attachments On this week’s episode, the guys discuss the wide variety of attachments that are available for the Hoss Wheel Hoe. They go through each attachment and help to explain which are the best wheel hoe attachments fo... The Difference in Wheel Hoe Attachments<br /> On this week’s episode, the guys discuss the wide variety of attachments that are available for the Hoss Wheel Hoe. They go through each attachment and help to explain which are the best wheel hoe attachments for each particular garden or situation. They talk about the new Winged Sweep attachment that just became available and how it has more "bite" than the cultivator teeth. This additional bite or angle of cultivation will be helpful to those with harder, clay soils or those with heavy weed pressure. They also differentiate between the standard Sweeps and the Oscillating Hoe attachments. They mention that the Sweeps are for lighter jobs, while the Oscillating Hoes are some of the best wheel hoe attachments for heavier applications. We offer 3 different sizes of the oscillating hoes -- 6, 8, and 12 inches wide. The guys are also in the process of designing a handheld oscillating hoe that will be released soon. The Spreader Bar is a tool that extends the length for adding more attachments or offsetting your work path. They discuss the usefulness of the Disk Harrow attachment for light duty cultivation in softer soils. The last attachment they talk about is the Drip Tape Layer attachment that fits on the Double Wheel Hoe which makes it quick and easy to lay drip tape by yourself in the garden.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment this week, the guys talk about the variety of collards that they are growing this fall. Travis has Tiger Collard variety of transplants that are very similar to the Top Bunch variety that was so popular for many years. However, due to crop failure, the Top Bunch variety is no longer available. Travis also has Lacinato kale and Red Russian kale that are ready to move into the vegetable garden. They also provide an update on the demonstration garden at the Hoss Tools Sustainable Living Center for the Sunbelt Ag Expo and mention that they will be planting some mixed greens and cover crops there in the next few days. The pest pressure has decreased drastically in the last couple of weeks which is great for the vegetable garden. The tool of the week is Spinosad which is an organic control that helps with pest problems in the garden such as worms, thrips, and caterpillars. It has two different modes of action it can kill on contact or kill by ingestion within 48 hours of applying to the plant.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer a question about well water vs. tap water and using drip tape on onions. Greg mentions that tap water, or "city water", can affect the pH of your garden soil over time. He believes the chlorine concentrations are low enough to not have a significant effect, but that the pH should be monitored if one is using municipal water on their vegetable garden. Greg says it is important to know what level of pH is in your water because it has an effect on your soils. He recommends taking a sample of your water to a local pool store and asking them to run a pH test on it. They guys are currently waiting for their onion stalks to come from Dixondale, but as soon as they receive them they will be planting onions. Travis explains that his system for planting onions has been extremely effective year after year. He recommends planting onions on drip tape, with two rows of onions per one line of drip tape.<br /> Tool of the Week<br /> <br /> Spinosad Garden Insect Spray<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EHLD0eV3Vv8 Greg and Travis clean 30:24 Row by Row Episode 20: The Basics of Vegetable Garden Irrigation https://hosstools.com/basics-vegetable-garden-irrigation/ Thu, 27 Sep 2018 17:10:27 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=41976 Improving Your Irrigation in the Garden On this week’s episode, the guys discuss the best solutions for vegetable garden irrigation. They discuss which crops are more suitable for overhead irrigation or hand-watering. These would include very short-term crops like potatoes, mustard, or mixed greens. They have such a short maturity date, it's really not worth the time to install drip irrigation on these crops. With longer maturing crops, they recommend using drip irrigation for many reasons. Using drip tape for garden irrigation saves time from having to move sprinklers around the garden and it also uses less water because the water is applied directly to the plant roots. Drip irrigation will also reduce weed pressure and plant diseases by limiting leaf moisture. Greg states that drip tape was designed to either go sub-surface or underneath the plastic mulch. That is the most effective way because it will not move around on you as it does laying on top of the soil. Our drip tape comes with emitters every 12 inches apart which allows water output for .4 gallons a minute per 100 feet. Using drip irrigation you are not wasting any water and all that water is going directly where the plant needs it. They answer some frequently asked questions about run time and using it with a gravity-fed system, lifespan, and removal. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment this week, the guys provide an update of the demonstration garden at the Hoss Tools Sustainable Living Center as part of the Sunbelt Ag Expo. Greg mentions that things are growing well despite some heavy whitefly pressure. They have a good stand of Ambrosia sweet corn growing and it will need hilling soon. They applied drip tape irrigation which has been great in these drought temperatures we have been experiencing. Travis mentioned that he recently planted a mixed greens variety that has Tatsoi, Mizuna, Red Russian Kale, and Arugula. He also mentions that his jambalaya okra is producing very well and he's been using a new technique called the "prune and whoop" which has been effective. The tool of the week is Rabbit and Squirrel Repellant this is the best product for keeping small rodents from eating your Brussel sprouts and cauliflower plants. It works best to apply early on in the garden and don't use close to harvesting time. The second tool of the week is we now offer a 1-pound package of Broadleaf Mustard. Cover crops are great for the garden because they break down into the soil and apply nutrients that the soil needs. Another advantage cover crops have is they keep nematode pressure to a minimum in the garden. These cover crops can be planted with a seeder or broadcaster in the garden. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer a question about planting cover crops. Greg mentions that cover crops will need a light layer of soil on top of them to germinate. If you have any kind of small seed you should plant it very shallow in the soil, but with full soil contact. So after broadcasting on top of the soil, a light raking is needed to cover the seeds for germination. Greg recommends planting these seeds at least a half inch in the soil. He mentions that a disk behind a tractor would bury the seeds too deep, but that the Disk Harrow attachment for the Hoss Wheel Hoe is a great way to cover those seeds in the vegetable garden. Tool of the Week Rabbit and Squirrel Repellent Broadleaf Mustard Cover Crop Seed https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w00gzeomf08 Improving Your Irrigation in the Garden On this week’s episode, the guys discuss the best solutions for vegetable garden irrigation. They discuss which crops are more suitable for overhead irrigation or hand-watering. Improving Your Irrigation in the Garden<br /> On this week’s episode, the guys discuss the best solutions for vegetable garden irrigation. They discuss which crops are more suitable for overhead irrigation or hand-watering. These would include very short-term crops like potatoes, mustard, or mixed greens. They have such a short maturity date, it's really not worth the time to install drip irrigation on these crops. With longer maturing crops, they recommend using drip irrigation for many reasons. Using drip tape for garden irrigation saves time from having to move sprinklers around the garden and it also uses less water because the water is applied directly to the plant roots. Drip irrigation will also reduce weed pressure and plant diseases by limiting leaf moisture. Greg states that drip tape was designed to either go sub-surface or underneath the plastic mulch. That is the most effective way because it will not move around on you as it does laying on top of the soil. Our drip tape comes with emitters every 12 inches apart which allows water output for .4 gallons a minute per 100 feet. Using drip irrigation you are not wasting any water and all that water is going directly where the plant needs it. They answer some frequently asked questions about run time and using it with a gravity-fed system, lifespan, and removal.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment this week, the guys provide an update of the demonstration garden at the Hoss Tools Sustainable Living Center as part of the Sunbelt Ag Expo. Greg mentions that things are growing well despite some heavy whitefly pressure. They have a good stand of Ambrosia sweet corn growing and it will need hilling soon. They applied drip tape irrigation which has been great in these drought temperatures we have been experiencing. Travis mentioned that he recently planted a mixed greens variety that has Tatsoi, Mizuna, Red Russian Kale, and Arugula. He also mentions that his jambalaya okra is producing very well and he's been using a new technique called the "prune and whoop" which has been effective. The tool of the week is Rabbit and Squirrel Repellant this is the best product for keeping small rodents from eating your Brussel sprouts and cauliflower plants. It works best to apply early on in the garden and don't use close to harvesting time. The second tool of the week is we now offer a 1-pound package of Broadleaf Mustard. Cover crops are great for the garden because they break down into the soil and apply nutrients that the soil needs. Another advantage cover crops have is they keep nematode pressure to a minimum in the garden. These cover crops can be planted with a seeder or broadcaster in the garden.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer a question about planting cover crops. Greg mentions that cover crops will need a light layer of soil on top of them to germinate. If you have any kind of small seed you should plant it very shallow in the soil, but with full soil contact. So after broadcasting on top of the soil, a light raking is needed to cover the seeds for germination. Greg recommends planting these seeds at least a half inch in the soil. He mentions that a disk behind a tractor would bury the seeds too deep, but that the Disk Harrow attachment for the Hoss Wheel Hoe is a great way to cover those seeds in the vegetable garden.<br /> Tool of the Week<br /> <br /> Rabbit and Squirrel Repellent<br /> Broadleaf Mustard Cover Crop Seed<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w00gzeomf08 Greg and Travis clean 30:24 Row by Row Episode 19: Growing Cover Crops to Improve Soil Health https://hosstools.com/growing-cover-crops/ Wed, 12 Sep 2018 15:38:08 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=41738 Importance of Cover Crops On this week’s episode, the guys discuss growing cover crops to improve garden soil health. Hoss recently added a complete line of cool and warm-season cover crops on their website, and the guys are excited to share these with the audience this week. Growing cover crops has many benefits including nitrogen fixation, soil building, weed suppression, erosion control, pest and disease suppression among others. All cover crops have certain benefits that they specialize in. They recommend using cover crops if you are not growing anything else in the fall garden because it will help reduce the weed seed bank in the garden. They discuss the five cool-season cover crops that should be planted in fall, giving the crops enough time to establish before winter frost arrives. These include crimson clover, hairy vetch, Austrian winter peas, winter rye, and tillage radish. Also, most of these cover crops can be planted with our Hoss Garden Seeder. The crimson clover we offer is coated with inoculant on the seed which makes it simpler to plant and grow. It also is great for pollinators like bees because they absolutely love it. For harder, clay soils, the guys recommend using tillage radish to aerate hard soils and improve drainage in areas that hold too much moisture. The Austrian Winter Peas are great for planting a food plot for livestock. Out of all the winter cover crops, it is the fastest growing cover crop. Next is the winter rye which a lot of commercial farmers that do no-till use when farming. This is the only cover crop that does not work with the garden seeder you should broadcast it in with a rake or harrow. The last cover crop they discuss is Hairy Vetch. This crop re-seeds really well so if you want a cover crop that is going to naturally re-seed and produce really well this is the one the guys recommend. Clover, vetch, and winter peas are all great nitrogen-fixers which sequester nitrogen from the atmosphere and add it to your garden soil. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment this week, the guys talk about their sweet potatoes that are still growing. They planted these in the middle of June and sweet potatoes usually require about 100 days to maturity. However, their plants were fairly weak when planted, which may delay this time to harvest. Travis brought a few small ones that he dug and mentions that they probably still need another 30 days or so to get larger. Travis also shows a photo of his Ambrosia sweet corn that was recently side-dressed with Chilean Nitrate and hilled with the High Arch Wheel Hoe. Greg shows a photo of his Pro-Cut Sunflowers that have started to bloom and are adding lots of color and pollinators to his fall garden. The guys talk a little bit about the crops growing down at the SunBelt Expo. However, they are experiencing some whitefly pressure which has the plants not doing too well. The tool of the week is our dibble wheel attachment that works perfectly for planting transplants or seeds. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about blood meal and baby lima beans. Greg mentions that blood meal is a fast, organic nitrogen source that can be used for heavy feeders like cabbage. He also mentions that he would probably not use it when close to harvest time. Travis addresses the baby lima bean issue and mentions that baby lima beans are a specific variety that has been bred to produce smaller beans. Tool of the Week Dibble Wheel Attachment https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lQpqBAGnnU0 Importance of Cover Crops On this week’s episode, the guys discuss growing cover crops to improve garden soil health. Hoss recently added a complete line of cool and warm-season cover crops on their website, Importance of Cover Crops<br /> On this week’s episode, the guys discuss growing cover crops to improve garden soil health. Hoss recently added a complete line of cool and warm-season cover crops on their website, and the guys are excited to share these with the audience this week. Growing cover crops has many benefits including nitrogen fixation, soil building, weed suppression, erosion control, pest and disease suppression among others. All cover crops have certain benefits that they specialize in. They recommend using cover crops if you are not growing anything else in the fall garden because it will help reduce the weed seed bank in the garden. They discuss the five cool-season cover crops that should be planted in fall, giving the crops enough time to establish before winter frost arrives. These include crimson clover, hairy vetch, Austrian winter peas, winter rye, and tillage radish. Also, most of these cover crops can be planted with our Hoss Garden Seeder. The crimson clover we offer is coated with inoculant on the seed which makes it simpler to plant and grow. It also is great for pollinators like bees because they absolutely love it. For harder, clay soils, the guys recommend using tillage radish to aerate hard soils and improve drainage in areas that hold too much moisture. The Austrian Winter Peas are great for planting a food plot for livestock. Out of all the winter cover crops, it is the fastest growing cover crop. Next is the winter rye which a lot of commercial farmers that do no-till use when farming. This is the only cover crop that does not work with the garden seeder you should broadcast it in with a rake or harrow. The last cover crop they discuss is Hairy Vetch. This crop re-seeds really well so if you want a cover crop that is going to naturally re-seed and produce really well this is the one the guys recommend. Clover, vetch, and winter peas are all great nitrogen-fixers which sequester nitrogen from the atmosphere and add it to your garden soil.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment this week, the guys talk about their sweet potatoes that are still growing. They planted these in the middle of June and sweet potatoes usually require about 100 days to maturity. However, their plants were fairly weak when planted, which may delay this time to harvest. Travis brought a few small ones that he dug and mentions that they probably still need another 30 days or so to get larger. Travis also shows a photo of his Ambrosia sweet corn that was recently side-dressed with Chilean Nitrate and hilled with the High Arch Wheel Hoe. Greg shows a photo of his Pro-Cut Sunflowers that have started to bloom and are adding lots of color and pollinators to his fall garden. The guys talk a little bit about the crops growing down at the SunBelt Expo. However, they are experiencing some whitefly pressure which has the plants not doing too well. The tool of the week is our dibble wheel attachment that works perfectly for planting transplants or seeds.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about blood meal and baby lima beans. Greg mentions that blood meal is a fast, organic nitrogen source that can be used for heavy feeders like cabbage. He also mentions that he would probably not use it when close to harvest time. Travis addresses the baby lima bean issue and mentions that baby lima beans are a specific variety that has been bred to produce smaller beans.<br /> Tool of the Week<br /> <br /> Dibble Wheel Attachment<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lQpqBAGnnU0 Greg and Travis clean 30:32 Row by Row Episode 18: The Best Fall Garden Varieties https://hosstools.com/fall-garden-varieties/ Wed, 12 Sep 2018 15:36:07 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=41737 Fall Garden Crops On this week’s episode, the guys discuss their favorite fall garden varieties that they're growing this year. The crops include broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, kale, lettuce, collards, beets, kohlrabi, cabbage, and mixed Asian greens. Their favorite variety of broccoli is called Green Magic and they like it because it is very heat-tolerant and does well planted early in the fall. They do mention that broccoli should be harvested before it gets too "seedy", as it is not very palatable once that happens. They mention Kale as being one of those "superfood" crops because it is loaded with antioxidants. Greg and Travis discuss three different fall garden varieties of Kale -- Lacinato, Winter Borer, and Red Borer. The guys recommend growing Kohlrabi in the fall garden as well. They are great for stir-frying or making slaw. For cauliflower, their preferred fall garden varieties include the Denali variety for a white cauliflower. Last year they tried the purple cauliflower variety called "Graffiti" and it did really well up until the first frost. The reason behind growing your own fall garden varieties is the ability to control what is being sprayed on the crops. Greg explains that most people do not know, but nitrates are not regulated on any type of green in the United States. Therefore, there are not any rules that farmers have to follow when it comes to spraying nitrate to their crops. So sometimes if you go buy some greens from the grocery store and you have stomach problems this could be caused by nitrate poisoning. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment this week, the guys talk about the Christmas Lima Beans that Travis has growing on a panel trellis in his garden. These are a speckled, running butterbean variety that has been very prolific when grown in previous years. The seed has a red and white variegated color that turns grey when cooked. These beans preserve well, dry well, and are also great for cooking fresh. Compared to a traditional green butterbean, these have a nuttier flavor that is great in soups. They also discuss a little bit about their potato situation in the vegetable garden. Travis has corm that is growing about a foot and half tall getting ready to hill. He believes it will be ready to harvest in 55 to 60 days. They hope to start planting sweet corn at the SunBelt Expo this week and get some other crops growing soon. The tool of the week is a Garden Knife combo which includes our Cabbage Knife, California Knife, and Farmers File. These are excellent knives to use for some of the fall crop harvests in the vegetable garden. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about nut grass and choosing between the High Arch and Double Wheel Hoe. Nutgrass can be one of the most persistent and annoying weeds in a vegetable garden. Travis mentions that it can be controlled by "aggravating it to death," which simply means frequently cultivating a few times a week. He prefers to alternate between the cultivator teeth and the sweeps on the Wheel Hoe. Greg distinguishes between the High Arch Wheel Hoe and the Double Wheel Hoe. He mentions that the High Arch Wheel Hoe would be his preferred choice because of the versatility it offers with cultivating and weeding attachments. However, if you want to use some of the other wheel hoe attachments like the drip tape layer attachment the double wheel hoe would be the better option. Tool of the Week Garden Knife Combo https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GcjbrASaad8 Fall Garden Crops On this week’s episode, the guys discuss their favorite fall garden varieties that they're growing this year. The crops include broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, kale, lettuce, collards, beets, kohlrabi, cabbage, Fall Garden Crops<br /> On this week’s episode, the guys discuss their favorite fall garden varieties that they're growing this year. The crops include broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, kale, lettuce, collards, beets, kohlrabi, cabbage, and mixed Asian greens. Their favorite variety of broccoli is called Green Magic and they like it because it is very heat-tolerant and does well planted early in the fall. They do mention that broccoli should be harvested before it gets too "seedy", as it is not very palatable once that happens. They mention Kale as being one of those "superfood" crops because it is loaded with antioxidants. Greg and Travis discuss three different fall garden varieties of Kale -- Lacinato, Winter Borer, and Red Borer. The guys recommend growing Kohlrabi in the fall garden as well. They are great for stir-frying or making slaw. For cauliflower, their preferred fall garden varieties include the Denali variety for a white cauliflower. Last year they tried the purple cauliflower variety called "Graffiti" and it did really well up until the first frost. The reason behind growing your own fall garden varieties is the ability to control what is being sprayed on the crops. Greg explains that most people do not know, but nitrates are not regulated on any type of green in the United States. Therefore, there are not any rules that farmers have to follow when it comes to spraying nitrate to their crops. So sometimes if you go buy some greens from the grocery store and you have stomach problems this could be caused by nitrate poisoning.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment this week, the guys talk about the Christmas Lima Beans that Travis has growing on a panel trellis in his garden. These are a speckled, running butterbean variety that has been very prolific when grown in previous years. The seed has a red and white variegated color that turns grey when cooked. These beans preserve well, dry well, and are also great for cooking fresh. Compared to a traditional green butterbean, these have a nuttier flavor that is great in soups. They also discuss a little bit about their potato situation in the vegetable garden. Travis has corm that is growing about a foot and half tall getting ready to hill. He believes it will be ready to harvest in 55 to 60 days. They hope to start planting sweet corn at the SunBelt Expo this week and get some other crops growing soon. The tool of the week is a Garden Knife combo which includes our Cabbage Knife, California Knife, and Farmers File. These are excellent knives to use for some of the fall crop harvests in the vegetable garden.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about nut grass and choosing between the High Arch and Double Wheel Hoe. Nutgrass can be one of the most persistent and annoying weeds in a vegetable garden. Travis mentions that it can be controlled by "aggravating it to death," which simply means frequently cultivating a few times a week. He prefers to alternate between the cultivator teeth and the sweeps on the Wheel Hoe. Greg distinguishes between the High Arch Wheel Hoe and the Double Wheel Hoe. He mentions that the High Arch Wheel Hoe would be his preferred choice because of the versatility it offers with cultivating and weeding attachments. However, if you want to use some of the other wheel hoe attachments like the drip tape layer attachment the double wheel hoe would be the better option.<br /> Tool of the Week<br /> <br /> Garden Knife Combo<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GcjbrASaad8 Greg and Travis clean 32:44 Row by Row Episode 17: Muscadines – A Staple of the South https://hosstools.com/muscadines/ Wed, 12 Sep 2018 15:34:51 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=41531 Let's Talk Muscadines On this week’s episode, the guys discuss muscadine grapes. Muscadines are a staple of the south and are not tolerable of extended cold periods below 10 degrees Fahrenheit. Muscadines are a native crop in the South that is definitely planted in the majority of everybody's yard around here. The can grow in zone 6 through 10, so pretty much mid-south and down can grow these muscadines without a problem. Travis shows examples of the four different varieties of muscadines planted on his homestead. He has two "bronze" varieties and two purple varieties. The larger bronze variety is called Scuppernong, which is probably the most prevalent variety. The smaller bronze variety grows in huge clusters and is great for making wine. Although the variety is unknown, the larger purple variety appears to resemble the popular "Cowart" variety, while the smaller purple one appears to be similar to the popular "Noble" variety. They discuss how muscadine vines are relatively maintenance free once established, and how they only need routine pruning once a year. Greg says the best way to eat them is fresh off the vine and demonstrates how to eat the muscadines since there can be a little trick to it. However, you should definitely avoid eating the seeds inside a muscadine. Travis explains that there is a particular way to prune muscadine vines such as leaving a certain amount of growth with the vines. Greg mentions the two ways of planting muscadines -- trellis system or arbors. Back in the day, they used to plant arbors and you were able to go underneath the vines to harvest the muscadines. However, arbors do not produce as many muscadines. Nowadays, the trellis system is the best and most popular technique. Greg talks about the muscadine wine that they make and mentions that too much can cause one to have the "zoomies." Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment this week, the guys talk about the crops they have been planting for fall. Travis has just planted a row of Rattlesnake Beans and Christmas Lima Beans on a panel trellis and they are just starting to emerge from the ground. These are both old heirloom varieties that have done well. Greg has a patch of Seminole pumpkins that are doing really well and starting to set small fruit in the garden. He has not experienced any trouble with mildew yet, so fingers crossed he does not have issues this growing season. The guys also have recently planted fall potatoes for the first time and are very hopeful for that experiment. At their demonstration garden for the Sunbelt Expo, they've planted zinnias, cockscomb, and okra thus far with much more to come. The tool of the week is our durable heavy-duty steel, dura rake which works perfectly for bed preparation and cleaning your garden area for planting. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about drying Indian corn and seed tray planting technique. Greg mentions that he puts his field corn in the greenhouse under a fan to keep the weevils off the corn until it dries completely. Then he will put the corn in the freezer which keeps the weevils dormant. Travis answers a question about overcrowding seed trays and he explains that they've never had any issues with their heavy-duty seed trays. He has a flat of scarlet kale for demonstration that is beautiful and ready to be transplanted in the garden. Greg and Travis recommended never skipping a cell when planting in a seed tray. Tool of the Week Dura Rake https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KNJtEvJc-Jk Let's Talk Muscadines On this week’s episode, the guys discuss muscadine grapes. Muscadines are a staple of the south and are not tolerable of extended cold periods below 10 degrees Fahrenheit. Muscadines are a native crop in the South that is definit... Let's Talk Muscadines<br /> On this week’s episode, the guys discuss muscadine grapes. Muscadines are a staple of the south and are not tolerable of extended cold periods below 10 degrees Fahrenheit. Muscadines are a native crop in the South that is definitely planted in the majority of everybody's yard around here. The can grow in zone 6 through 10, so pretty much mid-south and down can grow these muscadines without a problem. Travis shows examples of the four different varieties of muscadines planted on his homestead. He has two "bronze" varieties and two purple varieties. The larger bronze variety is called Scuppernong, which is probably the most prevalent variety. The smaller bronze variety grows in huge clusters and is great for making wine. Although the variety is unknown, the larger purple variety appears to resemble the popular "Cowart" variety, while the smaller purple one appears to be similar to the popular "Noble" variety. They discuss how muscadine vines are relatively maintenance free once established, and how they only need routine pruning once a year. Greg says the best way to eat them is fresh off the vine and demonstrates how to eat the muscadines since there can be a little trick to it. However, you should definitely avoid eating the seeds inside a muscadine. Travis explains that there is a particular way to prune muscadine vines such as leaving a certain amount of growth with the vines. Greg mentions the two ways of planting muscadines -- trellis system or arbors. Back in the day, they used to plant arbors and you were able to go underneath the vines to harvest the muscadines. However, arbors do not produce as many muscadines. Nowadays, the trellis system is the best and most popular technique. Greg talks about the muscadine wine that they make and mentions that too much can cause one to have the "zoomies."<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment this week, the guys talk about the crops they have been planting for fall. Travis has just planted a row of Rattlesnake Beans and Christmas Lima Beans on a panel trellis and they are just starting to emerge from the ground. These are both old heirloom varieties that have done well. Greg has a patch of Seminole pumpkins that are doing really well and starting to set small fruit in the garden. He has not experienced any trouble with mildew yet, so fingers crossed he does not have issues this growing season. The guys also have recently planted fall potatoes for the first time and are very hopeful for that experiment. At their demonstration garden for the Sunbelt Expo, they've planted zinnias, cockscomb, and okra thus far with much more to come. The tool of the week is our durable heavy-duty steel, dura rake which works perfectly for bed preparation and cleaning your garden area for planting.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about drying Indian corn and seed tray planting technique. Greg mentions that he puts his field corn in the greenhouse under a fan to keep the weevils off the corn until it dries completely. Then he will put the corn in the freezer which keeps the weevils dormant. Travis answers a question about overcrowding seed trays and he explains that they've never had any issues with their heavy-duty seed trays. He has a flat of scarlet kale for demonstration that is beautiful and ready to be transplanted in the garden. Greg and Travis recommended never skipping a cell when planting in a seed tray.<br /> Tool of the Week<br /> <br /> Dura Rake<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KNJtEvJc-Jk Greg and Travis clean 27:23 Row by Row Episode 16: The Complete Guide to Growing Vegetable Transplants https://hosstools.com/vegetable-transplants/ Wed, 22 Aug 2018 19:48:15 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=41456 Basics of Growing Vegetable Transplants On this week’s episode, the guys talk about growing vegetable transplants. When it comes to transplanting they recommend a lot of the fall and early spring crops -- Lacinato Kale, Green Magic Broccoli, Cauliflower, and Tiger Collards. Obvious crops like tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, lettuce, and kohlrabi all do better when transplanted. Depending on the certain growing season there are some crops that you can either direct seed or transplant. These crops include beets, okra, zinnias, and sunflowers. Travis says that crops like corn, beans, and peas do not try to transplant at all they just do better direct seeding. They cover everything from the best seed starting mix, the best seed starting trays, how to seed the trays, how to fertilize once the seeds germinate and more! They discuss several different methods for growing transplants including soil blocks, cheap, flimsy seed trays, and quality seed trays that last a lifetime. Greg and Travis explain that if you use soil blocks for growing transplants then you end up wasting time because they take so long to prepare. Although the guys explain that the most effective method for growing transplants is to use our high-quality seed starting trays. They debut the new Premium Seed Starting Kits for fall. Which includes a Dramm wand, wooden garden labels, four garden seed varieties, pro-mix seed starting mix, and a seed starting tray. These kits allow you to grow over 300 plants in one complete kit. Travis also explains why organic fertilizers do not work well on vegetable transplants because it takes too long to convert organic sources to a usable form of nitrogen. As a result, they recommend using a conventional fertilizer like 20-20-20 to get fast results and keep plants happy in the vegetable garden. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment this week, the guys talk about some cold crops like kale, kohlrabi, cauliflower, broccoli, collards, and lettuce that will be great to get ready to transplant soon. They show off a tray of zinnia transplants that are ready to be planted in their demonstration garden at the Sunbelt Ag Expo. They talk about how the root ball has developed nicely around the Pro-Mix seed starting mix. The Pro-Mix is also the tool of the week for this week. Greg and Travis have been using this seed starting mix for vegetable transplants for a long time in the greenhouse. As always the guys have tested this Pro-Mix in their greenhouses for a couple of years before adding it to our website. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about cover crop planting frequency and the most problematic weeds in their gardens. Greg mentions that cover crops should always be cut and incorporated into the soil before going to seed. Therefore if spring crops are finished, you would need to plant a summer cover crop and follow that with a cool season cover crop in the fall. Travis suggests growing buckwheat or millet during the summer, mowing that and incorporating it into the soil, then planting some crimson clover in the fall. Greg mentions that his most problematic weeds include pigweed, nutgrass, and crabgrass. Travis has a sample of some purslane from his garden and he explains that this weed is problematic for him because it doesn't dry and die as easily as other weeds. It is the most aggravating because in order to get rid of the purslane you must go into the garden and remove it by hand to throw it away. Tool of the Week Pro-Mix Organic Seed Starting Mix https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4IvmdyYMa74 Basics of Growing Vegetable Transplants On this week’s episode, the guys talk about growing vegetable transplants. When it comes to transplanting they recommend a lot of the fall and early spring crops -- Lacinato Kale, Green Magic Broccoli, Basics of Growing Vegetable Transplants<br /> On this week’s episode, the guys talk about growing vegetable transplants. When it comes to transplanting they recommend a lot of the fall and early spring crops -- Lacinato Kale, Green Magic Broccoli, Cauliflower, and Tiger Collards. Obvious crops like tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, lettuce, and kohlrabi all do better when transplanted. Depending on the certain growing season there are some crops that you can either direct seed or transplant. These crops include beets, okra, zinnias, and sunflowers. Travis says that crops like corn, beans, and peas do not try to transplant at all they just do better direct seeding. They cover everything from the best seed starting mix, the best seed starting trays, how to seed the trays, how to fertilize once the seeds germinate and more! They discuss several different methods for growing transplants including soil blocks, cheap, flimsy seed trays, and quality seed trays that last a lifetime. Greg and Travis explain that if you use soil blocks for growing transplants then you end up wasting time because they take so long to prepare. Although the guys explain that the most effective method for growing transplants is to use our high-quality seed starting trays. They debut the new Premium Seed Starting Kits for fall. Which includes a Dramm wand, wooden garden labels, four garden seed varieties, pro-mix seed starting mix, and a seed starting tray. These kits allow you to grow over 300 plants in one complete kit. Travis also explains why organic fertilizers do not work well on vegetable transplants because it takes too long to convert organic sources to a usable form of nitrogen. As a result, they recommend using a conventional fertilizer like 20-20-20 to get fast results and keep plants happy in the vegetable garden.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment this week, the guys talk about some cold crops like kale, kohlrabi, cauliflower, broccoli, collards, and lettuce that will be great to get ready to transplant soon. They show off a tray of zinnia transplants that are ready to be planted in their demonstration garden at the Sunbelt Ag Expo. They talk about how the root ball has developed nicely around the Pro-Mix seed starting mix. The Pro-Mix is also the tool of the week for this week. Greg and Travis have been using this seed starting mix for vegetable transplants for a long time in the greenhouse. As always the guys have tested this Pro-Mix in their greenhouses for a couple of years before adding it to our website.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about cover crop planting frequency and the most problematic weeds in their gardens. Greg mentions that cover crops should always be cut and incorporated into the soil before going to seed. Therefore if spring crops are finished, you would need to plant a summer cover crop and follow that with a cool season cover crop in the fall. Travis suggests growing buckwheat or millet during the summer, mowing that and incorporating it into the soil, then planting some crimson clover in the fall. Greg mentions that his most problematic weeds include pigweed, nutgrass, and crabgrass. Travis has a sample of some purslane from his garden and he explains that this weed is problematic for him because it doesn't dry and die as easily as other weeds. It is the most aggravating because in order to get rid of the purslane you must go into the garden and remove it by hand to throw it away.<br /> Tool of the Week<br /> <br /> Pro-Mix Organic Seed Starting Mix<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4IvmdyYMa74 Greg and Travis clean 38:44 Row by Row Episode 15: The Largest Onion Plant Grower in the U.S. https://hosstools.com/dixondale-onions/ Mon, 20 Aug 2018 18:21:50 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=41423 Special Guest: Brue Frasier On this week’s episode, the guys air an interview with Bruce Frasier of Dixondale Farms. While at a meeting in Chattanooga, Bruce and Greg had a chance to sit down and record a conversation for the Row by Row Garden Show. Dixondale Farms is the largest onion plant producer in the United States. As Bruce explains, if you purchase onion plants for your garden, there's a very high chance they were grown in Texas. Dixondale grows over 800 million onion plants per year, which include short-day, intermediate-day and long-day varieties. Bruce explains that the type of onion you grow will depend on your climate and daylength. When discussing fertilizer requirements for onions, Bruce likes to use 10-20-10 ratio that offers nitrogen. However, initially, phosphorous and potassium are what encourages root development in onions. Then they will take up the nitrogen and get growth and foliage. Bruce explains that a perfect onion has 13 rings. He explains how to grow the perfect onion in the garden. Greg mentions that the Texas Legend is his favorite variety to grow, and Bruce provides some other great variety suggestions for those living in northern climates. When discussing the red onion varieties his favorite is there exclusive Red Candy onion. According to Bruce producing red onion seeds are extremely difficult because they have a tendency to bolt easily. However, Red Candy is one of the most bolt-resistant varieties offered. So instead of a two-year process, they have to make it a three-year process which most other companies don't like to do. Bruce also mentions that they've recently started carrying shallots and leeks which are more fun to grow and great in soups. Shallots and leeks are known more in northern climate gardening than in the South. However, they can grow in the southern climates. Greg and Travis look forward to testing those out in their southern climate garden in the future. Show and Tell Segment On the Show & Tell segment this week, Greg has some pickled beets that a friend gave him. The guys have been growing beets consistently for a couple of years now and they intend to try picking some this year. Travis explains that he prefers to transplant beets as opposed to direct seeding them into the garden. This is because he can control the germination easier and get more consistently-sized beets and greens. Greg has some heirloom corn varieties, Bloody Butcher and Jimmy Red, that he harvested about a week ago from his vegetable garden. The tool of the week is our high carbon steel, diamond hoe that has nice quality ash handle with a wax finish instead of the lacquer handles that wear off easily. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about weeding slow-germinating crops like carrots and cover crops for clay soils. For slow-germinating crops like carrots, Travis suggests several techniques that can be used to control weeds until the plants are able to outpace the weed growth. These techniques include flame weeding and wire weeding in addition to ensuring the weed seed bank is reduced as possible. Carrots do a lot better direct seeding than transplanting. Travis suggests using the wheel hoe to get the weed seed bank depleted off and clean before starting to plant. For clay soils, the guys recommend rooted vegetable cover crops like purple top turnips and daikon radishes. Because their roots penetrate deep into the soil, they do a great job of making the soil more workable while adding quality organic matter in the garden. Tool of the Week Diamond Hoe https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=USVlYnoTiIA Special Guest: Brue Frasier On this week’s episode, the guys air an interview with Bruce Frasier of Dixondale Farms. While at a meeting in Chattanooga, Bruce and Greg had a chance to sit down and record a conversation for the Row by Row Garden Show. Special Guest: Brue Frasier<br /> On this week’s episode, the guys air an interview with Bruce Frasier of Dixondale Farms. While at a meeting in Chattanooga, Bruce and Greg had a chance to sit down and record a conversation for the Row by Row Garden Show. Dixondale Farms is the largest onion plant producer in the United States. As Bruce explains, if you purchase onion plants for your garden, there's a very high chance they were grown in Texas. Dixondale grows over 800 million onion plants per year, which include short-day, intermediate-day and long-day varieties. Bruce explains that the type of onion you grow will depend on your climate and daylength. When discussing fertilizer requirements for onions, Bruce likes to use 10-20-10 ratio that offers nitrogen. However, initially, phosphorous and potassium are what encourages root development in onions. Then they will take up the nitrogen and get growth and foliage. Bruce explains that a perfect onion has 13 rings. He explains how to grow the perfect onion in the garden. Greg mentions that the Texas Legend is his favorite variety to grow, and Bruce provides some other great variety suggestions for those living in northern climates. When discussing the red onion varieties his favorite is there exclusive Red Candy onion. According to Bruce producing red onion seeds are extremely difficult because they have a tendency to bolt easily. However, Red Candy is one of the most bolt-resistant varieties offered. So instead of a two-year process, they have to make it a three-year process which most other companies don't like to do. Bruce also mentions that they've recently started carrying shallots and leeks which are more fun to grow and great in soups. Shallots and leeks are known more in northern climate gardening than in the South. However, they can grow in the southern climates. Greg and Travis look forward to testing those out in their southern climate garden in the future.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the Show & Tell segment this week, Greg has some pickled beets that a friend gave him. The guys have been growing beets consistently for a couple of years now and they intend to try picking some this year. Travis explains that he prefers to transplant beets as opposed to direct seeding them into the garden. This is because he can control the germination easier and get more consistently-sized beets and greens. Greg has some heirloom corn varieties, Bloody Butcher and Jimmy Red, that he harvested about a week ago from his vegetable garden. The tool of the week is our high carbon steel, diamond hoe that has nice quality ash handle with a wax finish instead of the lacquer handles that wear off easily.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about weeding slow-germinating crops like carrots and cover crops for clay soils. For slow-germinating crops like carrots, Travis suggests several techniques that can be used to control weeds until the plants are able to outpace the weed growth. These techniques include flame weeding and wire weeding in addition to ensuring the weed seed bank is reduced as possible. Carrots do a lot better direct seeding than transplanting. Travis suggests using the wheel hoe to get the weed seed bank depleted off and clean before starting to plant. For clay soils, the guys recommend rooted vegetable cover crops like purple top turnips and daikon radishes. Because their roots penetrate deep into the soil, they do a great job of making the soil more workable while adding quality organic matter in the garden.<br /> Tool of the Week<br /> <br /> Diamond Hoe<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=USVlYnoTiIA Greg and Travis clean 25:41 Row by Row Episode 14: Wheel Hoe History from Planet Jr. to Hoss https://hosstools.com/wheel-hoe-history/ Thu, 16 Aug 2018 15:37:20 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=41349 Wheel Hoe History of Plant Jr. & Hoss Wheel Hoes On this week’s episode, Greg and Travis talk about wheel hoe history from the Planet Jr. to the modern day Hoss version. The wheel hoe history begins with the Planet Jr. which was a staple piece of farm equipment in the early 1900s. However, the production of the Planet Jr. Wheel Hoe was ceased in the 1960s. It wasn't until the 21st century that the Wheel Hoe regained popularity as the ideal weeding and cultivating tool for small market farms and backyard gardens. Planet Jr. made a single wheel model and a double wheel model of the wheel hoe. The double wheel model was similar to the modern-day version of the High Arch Wheel Hoe, with the extra clearance for taller crops like corn, beans or peas. Greg and Travis have some old Plant Jr. catalogs that they show and explain the difference to the modern day Hoss attachments. The major differences are the manufacturing of these attachments now that Hoss has evolved too. Back in the day, all of the Plant Jr. attachments were manufactured by casting. Now, we no longer having casting companies that make tools like this and if so it is not as great of quality and consistency is not the best. Greg talks a little bit about the two different handles that Plant Jr. offered which was a standard pistol grip handle and the steam bent handle. The standard pistol grip handles were cheaper to manufacture and the steam bent handles were used for the horse-drawn machinery. However, Hoss offers both the pistol grip handles and the steam bent handles on our website. Greg explains that if you are interested in the history of the Planet Jr. there is a Facebook group that you could join to learn more about the wheel hoe history. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment this week, Greg has some pickled okra in a jar and mentions that it is one of his favorite snacks from the garden. He pickles the okra with two different recipes, a sweet version and a spicy version. According to Greg, the best-pickled okra variety is the Red Burgundy. Travis mentions if you happen to grow to much okra a great way to preserve it is by pickling. Travis talks about some of the eggplant varieties growing in his garden this year. He mentions that he grows the unique varieties as opposed to the traditional Black Beauty variety. He especially likes the Japanese style eggplant which is long and slender and really great for frying eggplant chips. Travis also has a chamber bitter weed that he pulled from his garden. Which will grow between pepper plants that have been trellised up. More of a tropical week it will grow extremely fast and spread really bad in the garden if not controlled quickly. Greg says the best way to deplete this weed is by removing it mechanically from the vegetable garden. The tool of the week is the high carbon steel garden trowel that was made by a blacksmith in Missouri. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about pruning eggplant and nematode control. Travis mentions that he always prunes his eggplant mid-season because the plants get too wide. For nematode control, the guys suggest employing strategies of crop rotation, cover crops, and solarization. Proper crop rotation of nematode-susceptible crops should be practiced so that the nematode populations don't continually flourish. According to university research, cover crops of mustard are effective in reducing nematode pressure. In addition, solarization with a clear tarp can create enough heat to kill the nematodes. Tool of the Week Garden Trowel https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p4W5SKWfxEw Wheel Hoe History of Plant Jr. & Hoss Wheel Hoes On this week’s episode, Greg and Travis talk about wheel hoe history from the Planet Jr. to the modern day Hoss version. The wheel hoe history begins with the Planet Jr. Wheel Hoe History of Plant Jr. & Hoss Wheel Hoes<br /> On this week’s episode, Greg and Travis talk about wheel hoe history from the Planet Jr. to the modern day Hoss version. The wheel hoe history begins with the Planet Jr. which was a staple piece of farm equipment in the early 1900s. However, the production of the Planet Jr. Wheel Hoe was ceased in the 1960s. It wasn't until the 21st century that the Wheel Hoe regained popularity as the ideal weeding and cultivating tool for small market farms and backyard gardens. Planet Jr. made a single wheel model and a double wheel model of the wheel hoe. The double wheel model was similar to the modern-day version of the High Arch Wheel Hoe, with the extra clearance for taller crops like corn, beans or peas. Greg and Travis have some old Plant Jr. catalogs that they show and explain the difference to the modern day Hoss attachments. The major differences are the manufacturing of these attachments now that Hoss has evolved too. Back in the day, all of the Plant Jr. attachments were manufactured by casting. Now, we no longer having casting companies that make tools like this and if so it is not as great of quality and consistency is not the best. Greg talks a little bit about the two different handles that Plant Jr. offered which was a standard pistol grip handle and the steam bent handle. The standard pistol grip handles were cheaper to manufacture and the steam bent handles were used for the horse-drawn machinery. However, Hoss offers both the pistol grip handles and the steam bent handles on our website. Greg explains that if you are interested in the history of the Planet Jr. there is a Facebook group that you could join to learn more about the wheel hoe history.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment this week, Greg has some pickled okra in a jar and mentions that it is one of his favorite snacks from the garden. He pickles the okra with two different recipes, a sweet version and a spicy version. According to Greg, the best-pickled okra variety is the Red Burgundy. Travis mentions if you happen to grow to much okra a great way to preserve it is by pickling. Travis talks about some of the eggplant varieties growing in his garden this year. He mentions that he grows the unique varieties as opposed to the traditional Black Beauty variety. He especially likes the Japanese style eggplant which is long and slender and really great for frying eggplant chips. Travis also has a chamber bitter weed that he pulled from his garden. Which will grow between pepper plants that have been trellised up. More of a tropical week it will grow extremely fast and spread really bad in the garden if not controlled quickly. Greg says the best way to deplete this weed is by removing it mechanically from the vegetable garden. The tool of the week is the high carbon steel garden trowel that was made by a blacksmith in Missouri.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about pruning eggplant and nematode control. Travis mentions that he always prunes his eggplant mid-season because the plants get too wide. For nematode control, the guys suggest employing strategies of crop rotation, cover crops, and solarization. Proper crop rotation of nematode-susceptible crops should be practiced so that the nematode populations don't continually flourish. According to university research, cover crops of mustard are effective in reducing nematode pressure. In addition, solarization with a clear tarp can create enough heat to kill the nematodes.<br /> Tool of the Week<br /> <br /> Garden Trowel<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p4W5SKWfxEw Greg and Travis clean 34:04 Row by Row Episode 13: The Hoss Sustainable Living Center https://hosstools.com/hoss-sustainable-living/ Wed, 01 Aug 2018 20:00:34 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=41148 Sunbelt Ag Expo: Hoss Sustainable Living Center On this week’s episode, Greg and Travis talk about their yearly demonstration garden at the Hoss Sustainable Living Center. The Hoss Sustainable Living Center was started in 2014 as part of the Sunbelt Agricultural Expo in Moultrie, Georgia, which occurs every year in the third week of October. The Sustainable Living Center consists of an approximately half-acre demonstration garden in addition to a pavilion with exhibitors related to gardening and sustainable living. This allows customers to come and test out the tools in the garden and see which tools/products work best for them. Over the years, the guys have been able to experiment and determine which crops perform best in this planting area. Because the garden is surrounded by a 400+ acre research farm, the insect and disease pressure is troublesome. In addition, the garden is located in an old airfield that is extremely flat and drains poorly. The guys have had to add several amounts of good compost to try to build things up in the garden thus far and it seems to have helped greatly. Some crops that they have tried and seem to do really well there include kale, sweet potatoes, corn, and chard. They tried the Asian green mixes last year and they did really well also and only took 21 days to maturity. Every year they usually grow cauliflower and Brussel sprouts which are typically not ready to harvest at the time of the show but are fairly close. Although winter squash is timely for the annual agricultural expo, they don't grow very well there due to whiteflies and powdery mildew. Travis explains that they do not direct seed much when it comes to preparing plants for the demo garden only okra, corn, and sometimes peas. They typically like to transplant everything because it tends to grow better and they have better control when it comes to insect/disease pressure. This year they are trying fall potatoes for the first time and hoping that will be a success. If it does not Greg and Travis always have a backup plan to grow something else in the potato spot instead. Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment this week, the guys talk about pears and okra. Greg is eating a pear that he got from his neighbor's yard. He mentions that these old varieties of pears are harder, but tend to have great flavor and make great pies. Travis talks about his succession plantings of okra in his garden. He mentions that the first planting is getting too tall to harvest and that he may soon remove it and start harvesting the second planting. As they start planting for the SunBelt expo the tool of the week is our seed starting trays. They have a flat of binary giant zinnias that they have planted that are growing good. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about drip irrigation and amending clay soils. Travis explains how to calculate your water flow rate using a stopwatch and a 5-gallon bucket. Once the flow rate is calculated, it's easy to figure how much drip tape your well or water supply can support. Greg answers a question about amending clay soils in the garden. He mentions that adding significant amounts of good organic matter compost and gypsum or land plaster can improve clay soils. In addition, adding organic matter via cover crops and compost will improve soil workability and drainage. Tool of the Week Seed Starting Trays https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HDsXpjYdubo Sunbelt Ag Expo: Hoss Sustainable Living Center On this week’s episode, Greg and Travis talk about their yearly demonstration garden at the Hoss Sustainable Living Center. The Hoss Sustainable Living Center was started in 2014 as part of the Sunbelt A... Sunbelt Ag Expo: Hoss Sustainable Living Center<br /> On this week’s episode, Greg and Travis talk about their yearly demonstration garden at the Hoss Sustainable Living Center. The Hoss Sustainable Living Center was started in 2014 as part of the Sunbelt Agricultural Expo in Moultrie, Georgia, which occurs every year in the third week of October. The Sustainable Living Center consists of an approximately half-acre demonstration garden in addition to a pavilion with exhibitors related to gardening and sustainable living. This allows customers to come and test out the tools in the garden and see which tools/products work best for them. Over the years, the guys have been able to experiment and determine which crops perform best in this planting area. Because the garden is surrounded by a 400+ acre research farm, the insect and disease pressure is troublesome. In addition, the garden is located in an old airfield that is extremely flat and drains poorly. The guys have had to add several amounts of good compost to try to build things up in the garden thus far and it seems to have helped greatly. Some crops that they have tried and seem to do really well there include kale, sweet potatoes, corn, and chard. They tried the Asian green mixes last year and they did really well also and only took 21 days to maturity. Every year they usually grow cauliflower and Brussel sprouts which are typically not ready to harvest at the time of the show but are fairly close. Although winter squash is timely for the annual agricultural expo, they don't grow very well there due to whiteflies and powdery mildew. Travis explains that they do not direct seed much when it comes to preparing plants for the demo garden only okra, corn, and sometimes peas. They typically like to transplant everything because it tends to grow better and they have better control when it comes to insect/disease pressure. This year they are trying fall potatoes for the first time and hoping that will be a success. If it does not Greg and Travis always have a backup plan to grow something else in the potato spot instead.<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment this week, the guys talk about pears and okra. Greg is eating a pear that he got from his neighbor's yard. He mentions that these old varieties of pears are harder, but tend to have great flavor and make great pies. Travis talks about his succession plantings of okra in his garden. He mentions that the first planting is getting too tall to harvest and that he may soon remove it and start harvesting the second planting. As they start planting for the SunBelt expo the tool of the week is our seed starting trays. They have a flat of binary giant zinnias that they have planted that are growing good.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about drip irrigation and amending clay soils. Travis explains how to calculate your water flow rate using a stopwatch and a 5-gallon bucket. Once the flow rate is calculated, it's easy to figure how much drip tape your well or water supply can support. Greg answers a question about amending clay soils in the garden. He mentions that adding significant amounts of good organic matter compost and gypsum or land plaster can improve clay soils. In addition, adding organic matter via cover crops and compost will improve soil workability and drainage.<br /> Tool of the Week<br /> <br /> Seed Starting Trays<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HDsXpjYdubo Greg and Travis clean 27:07 Row by Row Episode 12: When NOT to Use a Tiller in Your Garden https://hosstools.com/tiller-garden/ Wed, 01 Aug 2018 18:08:58 +0000 https://b12e58ea6d.nxcli.net/?p=41038 Tilling in the Vegetable Garden: Do's & Don'ts On this week’s episode, Greg and Travis talk about using a tiller in the vegetable garden. The guys discuss several situations when it is appropriate to use a tiller, and other situations when it is not appropriate. The popular problem that we find is people tend to overuse the tiller in the garden. It's not a good idea to use a tiller immediately before planting. This is because tilling introduces many air pockets into the soil which can result in less than ideal seed germination. It's also not appropriate to till when garden weeds have gone to seed because that will simply bury those seeds where they can remain dormant and germinate later. Finally, tilling should not be done when plants are established because this can cause severe damage to feeder roots. Tillers should not be used as a cultivating tool because they create too much disturbance. Tillers are great tools in certain applications. These include breaking new ground, preparing the ground for root crops, incorporating cover crops into the soil and leveling the ground after hilled crops like corn or potatoes. Greg explains that if you are looking to repair damaged soil he suggests using the tiller once or twice a year only to repair the seedbed in the garden. Lastly, they talk about the different brands of high-quality tillers on the market. Up until 2001, the Troy-Bilt tiller was the top-notch rear tine tiller on the market. But that company experienced a buyout and are no longer the quality they once were. Currently, the top two brands available are the Grillo and BCS tillers, which are both manufactured in Europe. Both are high-quality machines with many different attachments for mowing, plowing, tilling and more! Show and Tell Segment On the show and tell segment this week, the guys talk about their squash plants that have been surprisingly successful during the summer heat. Travis mentions that he has two varieties currently growing -- Tempest and Patty Pan. He's been giving lots of attention to these plants to manage the squash bug population. He's also been applying fungicides twice a week to deal with the excessive rainfall they have been experiencing lately. He alternates between Liquid Copper and Complete Disease Control applications. With fall gardening right around the corner, the tool of the week is our heavy-duty seed starting trays. That works perfectly for transplanting tomatoes, okra, peppers, and watermelons. They also mention the possibility of offering a seed starting kit in the future. Viewer Questions Segment On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about shade cloth and spraying corn. They mention that they personally don't use shade cloth in the garden. Instead, they only grow during certain weather windows where success is more likely. Travis explains that he usually waits till the middle of October to plant carrots because the soil temperatures are cooler which means they will have better germination. Greg prefers to spray over the top tassel and let it spread over the corn for earworms. However, it can be hard to spray on some of the taller corn varieties like Jimmy Red. If he can not reach the tops because they are taller he prefers to spray the top of the silks of the corn. Overall, he prefers to go over the top of the corn with a good volume sprayer because of the excellent coverage it applies to the plants. Spraying early and coverage are the two most important factors when it comes to fertilizing the corn in the garden. Tool of the Week Seed Starting Trays https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q1Iunu8kmt4 Tilling in the Vegetable Garden: Do's & Don'ts On this week’s episode, Greg and Travis talk about using a tiller in the vegetable garden. The guys discuss several situations when it is appropriate to use a tiller, Tilling in the Vegetable Garden: Do's & Don'ts<br /> On this week’s episode, Greg and Travis talk about using a tiller in the vegetable garden. The guys discuss several situations when it is appropriate to use a tiller, and other situations when it is not appropriate. The popular problem that we find is people tend to overuse the tiller in the garden. It's not a good idea to use a tiller immediately before planting. This is because tilling introduces many air pockets into the soil which can result in less than ideal seed germination. It's also not appropriate to till when garden weeds have gone to seed because that will simply bury those seeds where they can remain dormant and germinate later. Finally, tilling should not be done when plants are established because this can cause severe damage to feeder roots. Tillers should not be used as a cultivating tool because they create too much disturbance. Tillers are great tools in certain applications. These include breaking new ground, preparing the ground for root crops, incorporating cover crops into the soil and leveling the ground after hilled crops like corn or potatoes. Greg explains that if you are looking to repair damaged soil he suggests using the tiller once or twice a year only to repair the seedbed in the garden. Lastly, they talk about the different brands of high-quality tillers on the market. Up until 2001, the Troy-Bilt tiller was the top-notch rear tine tiller on the market. But that company experienced a buyout and are no longer the quality they once were. Currently, the top two brands available are the Grillo and BCS tillers, which are both manufactured in Europe. Both are high-quality machines with many different attachments for mowing, plowing, tilling and more!<br /> Show and Tell Segment<br /> On the show and tell segment this week, the guys talk about their squash plants that have been surprisingly successful during the summer heat. Travis mentions that he has two varieties currently growing -- Tempest and Patty Pan. He's been giving lots of attention to these plants to manage the squash bug population. He's also been applying fungicides twice a week to deal with the excessive rainfall they have been experiencing lately. He alternates between Liquid Copper and Complete Disease Control applications. With fall gardening right around the corner, the tool of the week is our heavy-duty seed starting trays. That works perfectly for transplanting tomatoes, okra, peppers, and watermelons. They also mention the possibility of offering a seed starting kit in the future.<br /> Viewer Questions Segment<br /> On the question and answer segment, the guys answer questions about shade cloth and spraying corn. They mention that they personally don't use shade cloth in the garden. Instead, they only grow during certain weather windows where success is more likely. Travis explains that he usually waits till the middle of October to plant carrots because the soil temperatures are cooler which means they will have better germination. Greg prefers to spray over the top tassel and let it spread over the corn for earworms. However, it can be hard to spray on some of the taller corn varieties like Jimmy Red. If he can not reach the tops because they are taller he prefers to spray the top of the silks of the corn. Overall, he prefers to go over the top of the corn with a good volume sprayer because of the excellent coverage it applies to the plants. Spraying early and coverage are the two most important factors when it comes to fertilizing the corn in the garden.<br /> Tool of the Week<br /> <br /> Seed Starting Trays<br /> <br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q1Iunu8kmt4 Greg and Travis clean 29:44