Row by Row Episode 75: The Best Raised Bed Garden Tools to Have!

Best Raised Bed Garden Tools

When planting in a raised garden bed you can tools that allow you to get a little closer to the plants. The first tool the guys discuss is the short single tine cultivator. This garden tool allows you to rake across the weeds and get in between the drip tape in the vegetable garden. Travis mentions that the single tine cultivator works great for making mini furrows to prepare for planting in raised beds. The next best-raised bed garden tool is the garden trowel. It contains a high carbon steel blade with a hand-welded shank and hickory handle. The Crows Foot Cultivator is the perfect tool for amending and preparing the garden soil for planting. The steel tines allow you to break up the hardest soils to prepare them for future planting in the raised bed. While the Small Batwing Hoe is best for pulling up soil on to plants or covering planted seeds. The next tool is the Cape Cod Weeder which is designed to skim across the soil and you can basically control the depth at which it digs into the soil. It is also handy for weeding up close to plants that way you don’t have to worry about damaging the plants. Another quality short handle gardening tool is the Scuffle Weeder which works great for shallow weeding to remove the small surface weeds that come up in the garden. Then, we have the Digging Tool which is great for breaking up soil in the raised bed or even pots and containers in the greenhouse this is a handy tool to use for gardening. The Small Section Hoe is another handy tool with a triangular-shaped blade that allows you to make little furrows for planting in raised beds. Then, an all-around general tool that is great to have for lightweight and heavyduty planting is the Hoe Dag. It is another high carbon steel tool that contains a sharp edge on both sides. Another great quality about all of these tools is they are made in the USA and have a guaranteed warranty.

Show and Tell Segment

On the show and tell segment, Travis and Greg got an unexpected jumpstart in the garden. Travis went ahead and planted some onions in October that needed to be put in the ground. While Greg went ahead and planted some nesting onions, elephant garlic, and shallots in the garden.

Viewer Questions Segment

On the question and answer segment this week, the guys answer questions about storging turnip greens and the difference between insecticidal soap vs. horticultural oil. Travis goes into Mrs. Hoss’s raised bed garden to demonstrate how to pick and store some Tiger collards. He begins by picking a hand full of collard leaves off the bottom of the plant. Then, trims the stems and places them in a bag kind of similar to the produce bags at your supermarkets. Next, tie a knot at the top of the bag, poke some holes for airflow, and they will store away in the fridge for at least a couple of weeks. Greg mentions that the difference between insecticidal soap and horticultural oil is that the oils are heavier and work better on a wider array of insects in the garden. However, the oils do have issues when used in the hot weather conditions whereas the soaps do way better in these certain conditions. So the key take away is to use horticultural oil during the cooler weather months and insecticidal soap during the hot weather months in the garden.

Products of the Week

All search results
Scroll to Top

Subscribe to Our E-Newsletter and Get a Free Garden Planner with Your First Order

Shipping Info

For the contiguous 48 United States:

Orders less than $49:
$4.99

Orders between $49 – $99:
$7.99

Orders more than $99:
FREE

For Alaska and Hawaii, select your state on the following checkout page for a shipping quote.